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Motherboards Wire glue to repair damaged mobo tracks/traces?

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by llb443, 4 Jun 2010.

  1. llb443

    llb443 Assassins do it from behind.

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    I have never used wire glue, I have never seen it, I only just found out about it today... I am wondering if anybody has worked with wire glue.

    Do you think that you could use it to repair damaged/cut tracks on a motherboard. In my case i would have wanted to use it to repair, 5 tiny tracks all cut, similar to this:

    [​IMG]
    This shows 3 damaged tracks, but I had 5 damaged tracks

    Would it work if you smeared the glue all over the 5 traces, waited for it to dry, and then cut the glue (with a razor or something) to once again seperate the traces from eachother? but like I said, I have never worked with wire glue. will it be able to cut that finely, or will it start flaking or cracking?

    any info or links would be nice...

    as always, thanks in advance, LLB443
     
  2. JaredC01

    JaredC01 Hardware Nut

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    Personally I would scrape the traces then steal a wire from an 80-pin IDE cable and solder the connections back... Never even heard of wire glue, but I can't imagine it would last long-term.
     
  3. alpaca

    alpaca llama eats dremel

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    see those convolutions on the other traces? that's done like that so the resistance and capacitance of each track has to be just right. If you repair those broken ones(with any method) you would alter the resistance/capacitance of those wires. if you're lucky, it wasn't critical. if you're not, your board is already done for.

    so my advice: go nuts. the only thing you could do is save it.

    oh: with the glue: cut it with the razor when it isn't dry yet, that way it won't crack.
     
  4. Bloody_Pete

    Bloody_Pete Technophile

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    Aren't most motherboards multilayer thought? So if its a chunk like that one it may damage the underlying layers..?
     
  5. Bakes

    Bakes What's a Dremel?

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    That's my concern, Bloody_Pete.

    The traces are one thing, but when it's dug through you might be a goner. The best you can do is have a go, since the warranty will be completely void.

    From reading your post, it seems as if that isn't your motherboard. If you don't have the huge chip, you could have a go with a conductive pen. This would probably be easier. Unfortunately, I think you also implied that you do have the big chip. This makes me want to ask - How did you manage this?
     
  6. llb443

    llb443 Assassins do it from behind.

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    This is an Xbox motherboard, and this picture shows a common problem; whereby people damage their motherboards while trying to remove the X-clamps. This has to be done, with a small screw driver, reasonable force, and evidently a bit of delicacy. See below:

    [​IMG]

    All it takes is a little slip, and there you have the chunky dent... However, I bought an Xbox used from ebay. It came with a chunky cut, slightly bigger than the one shown above.


    What is a conductive pen, and how can it help me?
     
  7. Krikkit

    Krikkit All glory to the hypnotoad! Super Moderator

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    A conductive pen has some kind of tiny metal shavings suspended in a light glue to make, as the name suggests, a line which is conductive when you draw on the board. You can sometimes repair a broken trace on a mobo with it, but it's certainly not guaranteed.

    If the trace carries too much current the conductive line will likely just burn up because it's such a small amount of metal.
     
  8. Bakes

    Bakes What's a Dremel?

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    Conductive pens are great for bridging gaps. They're widely used for volt-mods and the like, where bridging gaps can change the voltage applied to graphics cards.

    You could try to 'draw' the traces back on with a conductive pen, going around the problem to avoid it. If you're lucky, it will work fine. If you aren't, it won't and it could cause some further damage. Damaging a broken Xbox further might not be such a large problem for you, though. I'd probably find a conductive pen easier to use than glue, if only because pens are easy to use :D

    I googled and found this thread from someone with a (I guess) similar yet not identical problem: http://www.team-xecuter.com/forums/showthread.php?t=54054
    Hope you find it useful.
     
  9. TheBlackSwordsMan

    TheBlackSwordsMan Far over the misty mountains cold

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    It's only an Idea, but back in the days, a friend of mine did a bridge with a hard-lead pencil. It was a Duron 2.4 if my memory is not at fault. Maybe it can work on Motherboard
     
  10. llb443

    llb443 Assassins do it from behind.

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    so it sounds like conductive glue has been around for a little while, and that it now comes in pen form? I was mainly asking into the nature of the wire glue, but now I guess that doesnt matter. cos if i ever need to use it, i will just try a pen... has anyone actually used one of these pens? just from the sound of it, it seems like it would need a few layers?

    and did the pencil guy, use the lead to draw a conductive line? or did he just use the lead?
     
  11. TheBlackSwordsMan

    TheBlackSwordsMan Far over the misty mountains cold

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    He used the lead to draw a conductive line. Back in the Day it was to unlock the Duron Coef XD
     
  12. Elledan

    Elledan What's a Dremel?

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    Reminds me of removing/installing HSFs on old mainboards with the clamp-around-ZIF-socket method which required one to push a screwdriver aimed straight at a fragile part of the mainboard :)

    I used tough cardboard or a piece of thick plastic back then to prevent any mishaps. I would think that such a thing would be useful to prevent damage in this case too?
     
  13. llb443

    llb443 Assassins do it from behind.

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    Yeah, I have removed these clamps successfully numerous times before... all it takes is a little bit of patience... it does get a bit annoying when you are trying for like ten minutes... it makes you want to just stab it... (I just go and make myself a cup of tea, and cool down for a while... and i havent had such a mis-hap yet)
     

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