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Electronics Wire Wrapping

Discussion in 'Modding' started by crazydeep74, 17 Mar 2007.

  1. crazydeep74

    crazydeep74 New Member

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    I want to wire wrap my computer, how ever I don't know much about it. I know you need the special 30 awg wire, and the tool, but "posts" where do I get these? are these just the small wires that come off of components (resistors, IC socket, etc..)?
     
  2. OtakuHawk

    OtakuHawk New Member

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    ...what? :confused:
     
  3. Xiachunyi

    Xiachunyi New Member

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  4. crazydeep74

    crazydeep74 New Member

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    Actually Wikipedia doesn't answer my question at all. However I did figure it out, but how do the different component parts connect to the posts?
     
  5. theurgy

    theurgy New Member

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    Which "posts" are you referring to?
     
  6. Wolfe

    Wolfe New Member

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    If the wikipedia article didn't answer your question, what you're thinking about isn't wire wrapping.


    Try and clarify what you are doing for us...
     
  7. crazydeep74

    crazydeep74 New Member

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    The only posts.
    "The sockets have square posts. The usual posts are 0.017 inches (432 micrometres) square, 1 inch (25.4 mm) high, and spaced at 0.1 inch (2.54 mm) intervals."

    Okay, I want to use wire wrapping as opposed to soldering the transistors, diodes, connectors, micro-controllers to the board, because my hands shake pretty bad, and I would make a big mess. Now the wikipedia article, does not say how the "posts" that you wrap the wire on, connect to the components (IE. the transistors etc.). I know the posts are put in holes on the Perfboard, and I know you use the special wire wrapping tool to wrap the wire on the post, but on the other end of the post , how does that connect to the component?
     
    Last edited: 18 Mar 2007
  8. chief11

    chief11 New Member

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    you can either use ic sockets designed for wire wrap, insert the transistors etc into the ic socket and wrap the wire on the pins. I think you would be better off using a solderless breadboard. you can get them from any decent electronics components suppliers and you don't need to worry about wire wrapping. in the end, you won't be able to do any serious electronics stuff unless you learn to solder though. maybe get a friend to solder for you if you are too shakey.
     
  9. cpemma

    cpemma Ecky thump

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    Wire-wrapping is a good method for prototyping logic circuits with lots of chips and few discrete components. As said you buy wire-wrap sockets and the pen tool and wire up point-to-point. You can also buy plastic combs to keep wires apart.

    Using the perfboard with copper rings round each hole you can solder in sockets and discrete components to hold them in place, leaving enough lead on the discretes to wrap (Wilip. talk of gluing in place on plain perfboard). The square IC socket legs cut into the wire to give a joint; with the round wire on other components you'll need to wrap then solder afterwards - the insulation is designed to burn off in soldering* (though I see Wikipedia suggest the wire is stripped first).

    Solderless breadboards are about as reliable as a Lada. Learn to solder.

    * edit: seems the wire-wrap system I'm on about was a variation marketed by Vero, guide here.
     
    Last edited: 18 Mar 2007
  10. agent420

    agent420 New Member

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    I'm just curious what exactly you mean by 'computer'? Mod your pc? Pic/Avr project?

    I don't know about that... not only can you create rather complicated circuits with ww (the original Apple computers were all ww prototypes), it is much easier to make circuit changes or correct wiring mistakes than pcb based designs. The only biggy is adapters would be reuqired to interface to today's small ic chips...

    Also, I was surprised to learn that ww actually creates a better, longer lasting electrical joint connection that soldering... I've seen this mentioned many places, but here's wiki's quote:
     
  11. crazydeep74

    crazydeep74 New Member

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    A PIC project, is what I meant. Quite true about the circuit complexity I know of at leaste one person who create an actual processor with wire wrap using 74LS and 74F-series TTL devices.
     
  12. chief11

    chief11 New Member

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    yeah, thats what I mean. Most chips are becoming smt now, specially the ones with oodles of io etc. Even if you wanted to use wire wrap with that, you would have to solder it to a board anyway, so may as well make a board for the whole project and solder everything. I've only tried wire wrap a couple of times and I guess I just didn't like using it very much. But each to his own I guess :)
     
  13. crazydeep74

    crazydeep74 New Member

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    I am worried about soldering because the aforementioned problem, which I figured out how to counteract while soldering, but also I heard IC components are VERY sensitive to heat, true?
     
  14. Xiachunyi

    Xiachunyi New Member

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    You could just solder in IC sockets and avoid the problem of overheating any chips.
     
  15. crazydeep74

    crazydeep74 New Member

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    True dat. Yeah well what about the transistors, capacitors, resistors, diodes, etc.?

    Edit : On second thought, I am thinking too deeply in to this, I'll get a nice low wattage soldering iron, with a fine tip, and it should be all good.
     
  16. Xiachunyi

    Xiachunyi New Member

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    You can stick in them in the IC sockets as well - especially if the IC sockets are the round machine-tooled pin flavor.

    As an alternative, look up SIP Female sockets. They can be cut to any number of pins to suite your needs.
     
  17. NoMercy

    NoMercy New Member

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    Wirewrap :rock: ... oh so much fun :)

    Now, of course you could then use lacing to keep your board looking ultra-tidy without any of those horrid cable ties. :)
     
  18. Xiachunyi

    Xiachunyi New Member

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    Wire wrapping may be fun (I have never wire wrapped in my life), but soldering is the way to go. :D

    [​IMG]
     
  19. Wolfe

    Wolfe New Member

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    As a rule? No.


    The whole sensitive to heat thing is a bit overblown. The precautionary measuers are generally targeted at big manufacturers who are producing thousands of units, where excessive heat in production can cause (perhaps) one failure out of every few thousand. In a assembly line setting, it's a big issue.

    However, as far as hobbyists go, heat really isn't that much of an issue. I regularly bake the crap out of IC's without any issues. Manually soldering SOIC SMT components and the such, and I have yet to have any issues. Pretty much all you have to worry about is components with plastic bits (like connectors) melting.

    There was one time when an IC on a breadboard got so hot it actually caused the plastic the breadboard was made from to start smoking, and it still worked fine afterwards. That was fun, The first time I've ever had a 7805 voltage regulator fail by shorting it's input to it's output. The end result: Apparently PIC16f675's can handle 14v for short periods of time without damage.
     
  20. cpemma

    cpemma Ecky thump

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    In the sense that prolonged exposure to high temperature will kill them, fair enough. But in many datasheets you'll see a line something like (for LM324 op-amp),
    Code:
    Soldering Information:
    Dual-In-Line Package
    Soldering (10 seconds) 260°C 
    
    With a bit of practice you can make a joint in well under 1 second, if it takes longer than 3 you're doing it wrong. ;)
     

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