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Other Advice about work

Discussion in 'General' started by crazyg1zm0, 18 Sep 2012.

  1. crazyg1zm0

    crazyg1zm0 Minimodder

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    Hi there fellow bit-tech members.

    I come to you today with a few questions regarding working in the IT industry.

    Now a bit of background first about what I currently do:

    At the present Time I work for a retail based tech support company and my job entails fixing both mobile phones and computers, but also I am from time to time I am asked to go onto the shop floor and help sell phones/computers/tablets. I do enjoy my job but due to issues within the company I really don't want to be doing this for more than another year or so. The main issues are:

    -No promotion opportunities unless I stop being a tech support person and just sell products
    -apart from my initial 2 weeks training (which was mainly using the company software) there is no additional training provided to us so everything I currently know and do daily I have had to learn myself and implement
    -Just feel undervalued I may not be a traditional tech support person working in an office etc as I end up being told to do more than I should be doing and covering for the sales staff because I know more about the products we sell than half of them.
    -and my shifts are 12 till 9pm most days and i get 1 weekend off a month. I very rarely get to go out and see my friends because i have such annoying hours.

    The questions I have for you guys are as follows:

    -What is the best way for me to gain qualifications in IT that will allow me to get a full time job somewhere in the industry where I have a normal work timetable.
    -which of these ways will not involve me being out of work as I currently get £17k a year pre tax and I simply cannot afford to be on less money.
    -How many companies will take on employees and actually properly train them and get them qualifications. as apart from this job I don't have any IT qualifications short of ECDL which I know means jack all to an employer.


    I look forward to seeing your answers and thanks in advanced to any help you fellows provide me

    g1zm0

    p.s sorry for any bad grammar its never been my strong point
     
  2. BennieboyUK

    BennieboyUK CPC Folder of the Month Sep 2011

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  3. MrDomRocks

    MrDomRocks Modder

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    I have an idea which company you work for. Knowing more than Sales Staff. It isn't hard most sales staff have no interest in the actual product just the basic information and making a sale. I have met one useful sales person who found me a router that wasn't on the shelf at the time and got me a little discount.

    This was many years ago now.

    In any case good luck. I have been trying to get into the IT Industry as a Tech Support type even on the lowest level for some time. It's just finding the right company that will take someone with computer skills but no formal qualifications. Currently I am completing a Distance Learning Course. It is an IT Diploma which might help me in the future. I am considering going to University also but only as a last resort to gain much needed Degree.

    Though if something came up which allowed me to learn on the job and gain formal qualifications within the IT Industry beyond how to use word etc I would take it.
     
  4. saspro

    saspro IT monkey

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    Self study is the way forward for IT qualifications.

    What do you want to be doing in IT?

    For MS stuff look at Microsoft Press books (exam 70-680 on configuring Win 7 is a good start)
    For Cisco I recommend Todd Lammle's book.

    CBT Nuggets cover most subjects and are great when used with the above books to take exams.
     
  5. crazyg1zm0

    crazyg1zm0 Minimodder

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    Cheers for the info guys :)

    As for what I want to do in the industry I don't really mind as long as I enjoy it have thought about bother server admin related stuff or just general desktop support.

    Either way I just want a better job where I have the chances of progression and gaining further qualifications to enhance my skills
     
  6. BennieboyUK

    BennieboyUK CPC Folder of the Month Sep 2011

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    OK, typed it on notepad this time!!


    Firslty it is good that you have had a think about this and seem to be willing to put some effort in, which lets be honest will be required - but maybe not as much as you think!! Also it is a great time to be learning, Windows 8 and server 2012 are with us and the course materials and learning modules for 2008 R2 and windows 7 are very mature.

    After looking at the link in my first post, I would have a think about what are of IT you would like to focus on, support, infra', web, system centre, cloud, hyper-v/vmware etc etc. If you are just looking to get a baseline to then work from I would highly recommned you start with something to gain a little confidence, such as Windows 7, Configuring - if you are already familar with the WIndows 7 GUI, this is a quick and easy win.

    You can also do all this self study while in full time employment, i generally take around 4 months to study a MCTS exam and sometimes a little longer. I generally do them while working, playing golf, swimming and waterpolo and family stuff etc. only really need to do a couple of hours a day.

    It also helps if you have a lab to use, as alot of the guides in the books from MS Press will have test labs for you to follow - i recommend doing them

    Finally after the books, run through the CBT nuggets, this will fill in any gaps in the books and will get you exam ready.
    2
    Once you have done the first one, and you get into the Microsoft learning cycle, they will come think and first and in just a couple of years you will have more MCTS PDF's on your HD than MP3's!

    If you need anything ping me a PM.
     
  7. Atomic

    Atomic Gerwaff

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    Yep, when backed with a a good basic level IT knowledge (retail tech support is a good example of this) and some self study you'll be in a good position to apply for jobs within a formal IT Department.

    If you want to work in small medium business (SMB) support, fair enough knowing a bit about Server OS's will help, but without proven experience and just a MS Cert you'd not be taken seriously if you apply for Server Admin jobs (aka 3rd Line) in a Enterprise support environment (Large business).

    If you want to go into the Enterprise support route, getting something windows-desktop based would be more use. Look for junior desktop (2nd Line) or Service Desk (1st Line) positions. In a larger organisations you'll have more chance of progressing into other teams and the business paying for you to do further training to enable that progression.

    No matter what others say knowing the basics of Linux will be of very little help when you're starting out. The majority of entry level positions will be in Microsoft environments. Most large organisations will only run specialist systems (largely financial or legacy DB's) on Linux and you'll not be let near them until you've got proven experience.

    IMO the route you follow now will be drastically different depending what type of Technician you are aiming to be...

    Have a read of this post and let us know where you're aiming to go 1st/2nd/3rd Line: http://www.certforums.co.uk/forums/...ween-1st-2nd-3rd-line-support.html#post297328

    Personally I think the best course at the moment is 680/685/686 (http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/mcsa-windows-7.aspx) to give you a Windows 7 Qualification, this will be the valuable to an employer as Windows 7 is the biggest migration a business will be going through at the moment.
     
  8. crazyg1zm0

    crazyg1zm0 Minimodder

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    I think for now I would be happy for 1st line given that I don't mind starting low and working up but I know i would like to be going level 2 and level 3 cause it seems like more of what i like to do.
     
  9. suragh

    suragh Derp

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    Just from experience, I took the Associate level and it only took me a few weeks to pass all 3 exams which covered on Servers/Networking and Windows 7 - 365, 366 & 367. Those are Level 3 based exams which I think you wanted to focus on doing which you pointed out in your last post; they are pretty damn easy as well.

    I may be wrong but I hope it can kinda help.
     
  10. saspro

    saspro IT monkey

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    As in 98-365, 98-366 & 98-367?

    If so then they're helpdesk level 1 & lower end level 2 stuff.


    Level 3 support generally involves 5-10 years experience as you're fixing really, really broken stuff.
     
  11. Atomic

    Atomic Gerwaff

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    Good to hear that, you're setting your expectations at the level you'd likely to be starting at. 1st Line is commonly known as 'Service Desk' and is mainly over the phone and email support, so very customer focussed. Ideal for you as you will already be skilled in this area due to your current retail-job.

    The Microsoft courses mentioned earlier would be good for you to study towards, but personally I would recommend to stay away from the server orientated ones as you won't likely be dealing with server OS support at this level.

    Windows XP, Windows 7 and Microsoft Office will be the day to day MS products you will likely be supporting.

    The other one that will help set you apart from other candidates is ITIL, it's not a technical qualification, more theoretical but it is valued highly by enterprise level businesses as most (if not all) will follow a lot of ITIL processes.

    http://www.itil-officialsite.com/Qualifications/ITILQualificationLevels/ITILFoundation.aspx
     
  12. crazyg1zm0

    crazyg1zm0 Minimodder

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    I have been told of ITIL apparently its stupidly expensive but a friend told me to learn up on it so i know the info for it so I am able to at least say i have a knowledge of it and can impliment it.
     
  13. Atomic

    Atomic Gerwaff

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    You would only need to study to ITIL Foundation so it's only one exam. I went in knowing nothing about ITIL, did the study and exam in one day. It wasn't hard to pass at all. Even our non technical service desk managed it.

    Work paid for a trainer to come to us as the whole team was being trained so i can't comment on cost. I would go for you MS Certs first as they will be more useful. Certainly study ITIL as just writing on your CV that you have knowledge of ITIL will open doors.
     
  14. crazyg1zm0

    crazyg1zm0 Minimodder

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    Due to excrement hitting the fan with my current employer i Need to find a new job before they make me (and my co-workers) redundant

    Anyone know any good IT recruitment websites with a vast library of jobs to apply for?

    Pete
     
  15. Tibby

    Tibby Back Once Again

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    Not sure if it's the route you want to take, but apprentice schemes are becoming more popular with the bigger companies.

    I work at one of the bigger tech companies in the UK, and we've just started ramping up our apprentice scheme.
     
  16. Jaybles

    Jaybles What's a Dremel?

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    What are the prerequisites for an apprenticeship and what level are they?
    Slight thread hijack.

    http://www.theitjobboard.co.uk/
     
    Last edited: 27 Sep 2012
  17. Tibby

    Tibby Back Once Again

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    I can't speak for all industries/companies, but my impression from our scheme is that it falls into 2 categories:

    1. People who've finished A-Levels/Similar and don't want to go to Uni, and instead want to come straight into the company.
    2. People who've dropped out of Uni but still show academic potential.

    I get the impression it's for the sub-25 bracket, but never say never etc.
     
  18. crazyg1zm0

    crazyg1zm0 Minimodder

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    The only issue i have with apprentice schemes is that they don't pay enough to cover my bills and rent etc. I need at least £700 a month after tax to live on with rent and bills. and most fo the schemes I have seen pay £100 a week give or take and I just cant afford that :(

    If they could pay me enough I would be all over an apprentice scheme like a rash on a babies arse

    EDIT Cheers for the link :)
     
  19. Tibby

    Tibby Back Once Again

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    My work's apprentice scheme pays around £17k I believe, and after the first 2/3 years (the programme is still getting defined) you are pushed up to £29k to match what graduates come in at.
     
  20. crazyg1zm0

    crazyg1zm0 Minimodder

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    I need a job like that in Manchester So much. I would be all over that Tibby
     

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