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Blogs Are manufacturer ecosystems growing too large?

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by bit-tech, 27 Jun 2019.

  1. bit-tech

    bit-tech Supreme Overlord Staff Administrator

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  2. Anfield

    Anfield Well-Known Member

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    Yes, they are growing too large:
    As mentioned for consumers there is the threat that cross brand compatibility could go away, for the brands themselves it also creates practical problems (keeping more products up to date, convincing shops to stock the lot, providing support for everything rather than s specific type of product etc)

    No, they aren't growing too large:
    Capitalism demands growth but you can only sell so many of product x which means branching out into product y is a requirement imposed on brands by capitalism.
     
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  3. Corky42

    Corky42 Where's walle?

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    Most of them aren't really that different though, most products are manufactured by one or two companies with some minor tweaks and some branding slapped on it.

    I blame PSUs as i think it started with them.

    I agree though that it's natural progression, market forces reduce manufacturing to a few players because of costs of scale and those same market forces mean you end up with superficial changes being made to give a sense of choice.

    /Grumpy old man rant...is it the weekend yet?
     
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  4. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    Am I the only one here who remembers the days before open architecture? I mean, as fun as the fights between Camp Commodore and the Spectrum Squad were, I don't miss having to consult my mahoosive A2 multicolour Personal Computer World BASIC equivalence chart to figure out how to convert an Amstrad programme into an Acorn programme...

    Speaking of open architecture, I can heartily recommend Open by Rod Canion. I mean, it's massively one-sided, but it's a bloody interesting side.
     
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  5. Anfield

    Anfield Well-Known Member

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    Luckily I missed out on that due to not being allowed to use electronic devices as a kid:hehe: (yeah, my mom is a bit loopy)
     
  6. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    Mate of mine grew up with a hippy-dippy family - only unpainted wooden toys for the kids.

    He ran a highly successful hobbyist electronics company before going into semi-retirement to raise a kid as a full-time parent. Go figure.
     
  7. edzieba

    edzieba Virtual Realist

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    And later in the DOS era with non-universal video and sound interfaces. Or the early Window era, with multiple proprietary 3D accelerator APIs. It probably wasn't until Windows 98 where DirectX managed total ubiquity and finally killed off the majority of vendor-specific device APIs (for GPU and sound devices).
     
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