1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

News ASRock first to enable non-K base clock overclocking

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Gareth Halfacree, 14 Dec 2015.

  1. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    4 Dec 2007
    Posts:
    11,182
    Likes Received:
    1,149
  2. schmidtbag

    schmidtbag New Member

    Joined:
    30 Jul 2010
    Posts:
    1,082
    Likes Received:
    10
    Oh no not a disabled IGP!

    In all seriousness, this is pretty cool. I wonder if this works for locked Xeons too.
     
  3. SchizoFrog

    SchizoFrog New Member

    Joined:
    5 May 2009
    Posts:
    1,574
    Likes Received:
    8
    If this is possible, I am wondering what took the MB makers so long to implement it?
    Also it would be good to get a full run down of the levels of comparison... Can you get even higher overclocks with 'K' models with a combination of overclocking settings? Do the standard chips overclock to the same levels as the 'K' versions or even higher using this setting?...

    This subject raises a LOT of questions...
     
  4. schmidtbag

    schmidtbag New Member

    Joined:
    30 Jul 2010
    Posts:
    1,082
    Likes Received:
    10
    I was thinking the same thing, but given my experience with unlocked CPUs, I'm guessing the answer is no, K series won't achieve higher overclocks (at least not much beyond 100MHz).

    When it comes to overclocking, as long as you have the final frequencies of the northbridge, RAM, and PCIe bus equal to or below their default speeds, the only limitation to overclocking is the CPU itself. That being said, in theory, you should be able to achieve the same overclock with BLCK as you can with an unlocked multiplier.

    Unlocked multipliers made life SO much easier. All you had to do was increment the multiplier, tweak the voltage, and then you were done. Makes overclocking hardly worth gloating about, since it takes no skill to do it.

    I may be wrong though - I haven't overclocked an Intel system since Core2.
     
  5. cdb

    cdb No comment

    Joined:
    25 Apr 2009
    Posts:
    476
    Likes Received:
    4
    I wonder how long before Intel say "Stop it!!"
     
  6. hyperion

    hyperion Active Member

    Joined:
    30 Jun 2007
    Posts:
    754
    Likes Received:
    30
    That mobo is a bit expensive. I think you might be better off just getting a K series and a cheaper mobo, and save yourself some hassle in the process.
     
  7. TheMadDutchDude

    TheMadDutchDude The Flying Dutchman

    Joined:
    23 Aug 2013
    Posts:
    4,534
    Likes Received:
    451
    It will be unlocked on cheaper boards later. Us overclockers just had to get a good board to prove a point first. ;)
     
  8. SchizoFrog

    SchizoFrog New Member

    Joined:
    5 May 2009
    Posts:
    1,574
    Likes Received:
    8
    I wonder if this will 'force' Intel to improve the Skylake revision or even the Canonlake processors? I mean, why would you buy those if their performance is only slightly better than these Skylakes at stock and then even non-K versions can gain up to a 1GHz boost?

    I am also surprised that others haven't jumped in about AMD being even worse off than they were...
     
  9. law99

    law99 Custom User Title

    Joined:
    24 Sep 2009
    Posts:
    2,378
    Likes Received:
    59
    AMD are even worse off now, than they were...
     

Share This Page