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News BBC confirms new computing in schools programme

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by brumgrunt, 16 Feb 2012.

  1. brumgrunt

    brumgrunt New Member

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  2. MSHunter

    MSHunter Well-Known Member

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    This would be great for our children and on a completely selfish note, the Raspberry Pi being mass produced might lead to larger supply and lower price *dreaming*
     
  3. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    Lower than $25? Doubtful - it's already being made as cheaply as possible by a non-profit. Economies of scale wouldn't knock more than a few pence off per unit when they're already making them in batches of 10,000.
     
  4. Stotherd-001

    Stotherd-001 Member

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    You need a lower price on $35? I'm hoping for more models and add ons if it gets popular enough.

    I just hope Apple doesn't try to get involved or it'll turn into an "ipad for every child" program. Though the BBC might end up doing that themselves...
     
  5. steveo_mcg

    steveo_mcg New Member

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    I was watching this on twitter and tbh was thoroughly confused, that clears it up at least.

    So a (mostly) universal IDE even ardent Linux haters should be able to get on board with this. MS fan boiys should probably avoid I'm guessing it won't feel much like Visual Studio.

    +1 to more add ons, arduino style shields could be awesome.
     
  6. Hustler

    Hustler Well-Known Member

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    "The old farts among our readership may remember the original BBC project to bring computing into schools"

    Corrected for accuracy..:))
     
  7. Flibblebot

    Flibblebot Smile with me

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    ...and of course it brings the Acorn/ARM story full circle - they made their money with the BBC Model B and, 30 years on, their tech will be back in schools again.

    All we need now is for the Research Machines 380Z to be relaunched and I'll be reliving my school years all over again :D

    (Yes. I'm an old fart and proud of it. Kids these days don't know how good they've got it. Bah humbug, and all that :lol:)
     
  8. digitaldunc

    digitaldunc New Member

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    Excellent -- if the state of computing being taught in schools is anything as backwards as when I left (2002) then this should help stimulate things somewhat.

    Funnily enough we were still using BBC Masters, I created my final robotics tech project in BASIC :)
     
  9. Andy Mc

    Andy Mc Well-Known Member

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  10. Atomic

    Atomic Gerwaff

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    It's still as backwards as ever, I tutor a couple of A Level "ICT" students and it's just glorified MS Office training!

    There's no real 'computing' taught in schools anymore, when I did my computing A Level we learned binary maths and programming theory before actually making a program for a final project. None of that exists in schools anymore.
     
  11. mucgoo

    mucgoo Well-Known Member

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    There still a computing A-level but given that its a completly new subject with previous experiences of IT being limited to MS office training uptakes low and the content basic due to the need to start from no prior knowledge and shoddy maths abilities.
     
  12. Blademrk

    Blademrk Why so serious?

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    I still have my BBC :)
     
  13. vodkas666

    vodkas666 New Member

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    Hoping to go into teaching after my Physics research degree, I personally feel this is a great move. I came into the computing game very later cause of my and my parents finances but my first experience of computers came under an Acorn at my primary due to the enthusiasm of my Year 4 teacher. My family could only afford hand-me-down computers that needed programming to even work which benefited me hugely later in life, mainly at degree level. Anyway I believe that teaching children how to actually code rather than the MS office **** I got "taught" would massively benefit the country. Also as a "computer geek" I would actually like to teach coding than any MS office crap that companies appear to want.
     
  14. phuzz

    phuzz This is a title

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    My dad was a teacher, and his school didn't want to keep their shiny new BBC Micros in the school over the holidays, so my dad brought one home.
    20-something years later I earn my living in IT, I don't know what I'd be doing if I hadn't had that BBC to play with one holiday.
     
  15. Atomic

    Atomic Gerwaff

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    Guess I'm a few years younger than you... I remember my mum bringing her classroom Acorn computer home in the holidays, I'd say it certainly helped get me into IT too.

    Computers are such common place in homes now and have become so easy to use, yet the syllabus has hardly changed in 10years no wonder kids are bored and don't want careers in IT!
     
  16. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    Update: Some quotes in the article have been corrected at Alan O'Donahoe's request.
     
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