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Modding Custom GPU Waterblock

Discussion in 'Modding' started by [seriousdesert], 31 Mar 2010.

?

Think it will work?

  1. Yes

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. No

    3 vote(s)
    100.0%
  1. [seriousdesert]

    [seriousdesert] New Member

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    I recently started reading through guides and posts etc on bit-tech and decided i was going to make my own GPU waterblock.
    I have an XFX 8800gt with a really really loud fan so i figured it was time to get rid of it.

    I'm a complete noob at this kind of stuff, so helpful advice would be much appreciated.

    I'm basically wondering what size barbs i should use and whether or not i'd be able to use an air cooled heatsink and convert it.

    [​IMG]

    So far my general plan is cut out the heatsink shown in the red (please forgive my poor annotation skills :D) as well as all the the stuff inside the channels. i'm then hoping to re arrange to pieces of copper to create turbulance throughout the channels up until the final channel leading into point B, to restore laminar flow.

    Is this a ridiculous idea with no hope of success?
     
  2. asura

    asura jack of all trades

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    I'd been hopeing to pick up some ideas/tips as I'm planning to make a waterblock for my GPU (which has no waterblock on the market) but I see I can answer more questions that ask.

    Ok, Breaking everything down into easy bitesized chunks...

    Q: "...what size barbs i should use..."
    A: Barb size is (at this stage) a moot point, you can chop change barbs at will though I understand that DD fatboys are a decent choice, I love the look of Bitspowers new(ish) matt black compression fittings. What I think you *really* want to know is what size of thread do I need for my barbs and the answer to that is 1/4" bsp, most barbs, comps, etc. use a 1/4" thread. For drill sizes etc wikipedia is your friend.

    Q: "...use(ing) an air cooled heatsink and convert..."
    A: It's perfectly possible but it'd be a long hard slog, and you have a wide range of choices; how to block off the ends of the fins, will it be with goop (eppoxy putty), will you solder a plate on, hard soldering or soft, will tap and bolt a plate of copper, acrylic? How to attach the top plate, remember it should be removable for cleaning. etc. etc. etc.

    Q: Is this a ridiculous idea...
    A: Yes. With profesionaly made 8800 waterblocks selling on e-bay for as little as a tenner, and the definate possibility that your material costs for making this could run to three or four times that. Unless you have a very definate idea about what you want to achieve I'd tend to keep an eye on e-bay and pick up a bargin.

    Q: ...with no hope of success?
    A: No. That's no, to no, so a double negative, so yes there is hope of sucess, depending on your level of skill and dedication.

    Whichever way you choose to go, good luck.
    Regards,
    Alex.


    p.s. Head over to EK waterblocks, he's quite open about the layout of his blocks, and there are pritty pictures, annotated pdf's gallore.
     
    Last edited: 31 Mar 2010
  3. [seriousdesert]

    [seriousdesert] New Member

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    with regards to barb size, i was thinking more, is it bigger is better because of higher flow and less restriction? or are there other factors i'm missing?

    Yeah i just check ebay, seems logical to buy one for £25 quid or so.

    But i've got a broken leg and nothing to do, so i might just do this for fun and see what i can do anyway, i can't see any harm coming from it :)

    About the sealing method, i'm thinking i'll probably use copper or tin plates just to pretty much make a wall, soft soldered. It's gonna be a hell of a bodge job, but that's the way i like it :D



    I happened to notice this design a couple of days ago, what do you think?
    http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/water-cooling/19606-home-made-gpu-water-block.html
     
  4. Burnout21

    Burnout21 Is the daddy!

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    Hydraulics 101

    Bigger is not always bettter, actually if your were to plot the flow rate vs pressure of all common fittings the pressure loss ratio would be the same.

    ergo, be you using 10mm tubing or 3/4in tubing, it ain't going to make any difference at the pressures we can generate with current pumps.

    The block your planning could have a bard that is 3ft in diameter lets say, (yes 3ft) but the internal geometry of the block would be the main issue of reducing flow rate which in turn increases internal pressure. ergo fitting size is a mute point.

    Stick with the G1/4 in fitting, easy to find taps and fittings.
     
  5. kinghong1970

    kinghong1970 Just a Clumsy Ape

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    um... you'd either need a CNC or a manual milling machine with some skills to follow.
    oh, did i mention the added machinery you need to run it and also mill copper?

    or you can spend the money to get it prototyped by a machine shop... and pay someone to make the cad for the block...

    or just buy one thats already made that's out there...

    or, if nothing else is WC'd in your box, just get a better aftermarket HSF unit?

    but then again, if your fingers are itching to make something... that's how we all learn... no?
    good luck...

    you probably want more surface area for to transfer heat from the block to the coolant.

    cheers!
     
  6. asura

    asura jack of all trades

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    If you're going to give it a bash then probably the easiest thing would be something like this...

    [​IMG]

    Remove the fins in the yellow shaded area, except those that are coloured green, this makes a winding path for the water and makes the most out of the fins you've got without haveing to construct a complex little box, simple is you're friend. Solder your end pieces on, figure out a way to attach a plexi/accrylic top, tap the top and you're ready to go. No good for SLI, but then neither was you're origional so I just assume that's not a pre-requesit.

    Burnout - Yea I remember either Skinnee, or Martin, or somebody elce (so presice) testing different tubeing diameters and finding very, very, very, very little diffrence.

    Kinghong, as I understand it he's not wanting to make a whole new block (unless the canucks have changed his mind) and for the modding he's wanting to do a well equiped hobby drill should suffice. But yea; a really good point, if nothing elce is WC then Acrtic Cooling make some good quiet HSF for GPU's
     
  7. [seriousdesert]

    [seriousdesert] New Member

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    @asura - i'd thought of something like this, but surely if do this yeah it'll be simple but there'll be massive laminar flow so cooling will be inefficient?

    I don't have any WC at the moment, but you've got to start somewhere and i don't have the money to buy a whole rig, so i thought i'd have some fun and try making my own GPU and CPU blocks then if they work buy a pump and radiator.
     
  8. asura

    asura jack of all trades

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    To add turbulence solder copper pins along the valley's in staggered patterns, let your imagination run wild!

    You would get better results as kinghong said starting with a block of copper and milling it to a design, but that's a touch tricky/expensive. Though, if memory serves you can get router jigs for dremel's and possibly for other hobby drills too, then grab some jewellers milling bit's (designed to work with silver/gold, which have quite similar working properties to copper) and the world's your mollusc of choice.
     

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