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Cooling Dielectic coolants?

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Cabe, 15 Dec 2002.

  1. Cabe

    Cabe New Member

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    New pc, means new mods. So my rig will be getting a shiny liquid cooling system.

    However, as its a rather expensive piece of kit (and water short circuit damage is NOT covered by the warrenty) I was wondering about dielectic/non-conductive coolants.

    Mineral Oil springs to mind, but its a lot less viscous (liquidy) than water.

    so, ny suggestions?
     
  2. geek1017

    geek1017 New Member

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    Normal distilled or de-ionized water should do you fine.
    If you really want to be extreem you could use isopropyl alchohol(sp?)
    If you have an unlimited amount of money you could try some nifty stuff from 3M called Hydrofluroether.
    It has been used before in submersion cooling but I don't see why it wouldn't work in a "normal" watercooling setup.
    I don't have the link handy but somebody tried submersion cooling using some sort of transformer liquid stuff.
    Someone else more knowledgeable will surely come along and give you better info.
     
  3. Cabe

    Cabe New Member

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    I assumed because Destilled was used in batteries it was conductive?

    if so, thats great, as its dead easy to get hold of.
     
  4. Transic

    Transic New Member

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    That 3m hfe liquid makes the wallet go ouch...$300.00 a gallon...needs to be replaced every 3 months.... :eyebrow:

    Linkie: Hydrofluoroether
     
  5. Cabe

    Cabe New Member

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    i would be cheaper to risk it with water!
     
  6. Shadowspawn

    Shadowspawn Another hated American.

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    Actually, I thought I read somewhere that perfectly distilled water didn't conduct? That it was impuritys in the water that did the conducting? I'm probably wrong though.
     
  7. Cabe

    Cabe New Member

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    if it doesnt, then I win :)

    theres a car garage at the end of my road that has a distiller for making thier own water for use in batteries.

    im sure they'd sell me some
     
  8. bee2643

    bee2643 New Member

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    im not sure if this helps
    but before cooling a rig with ln2 they always submerse the components in flourenheurt or something of the fact
    perhaps this is what your looking for?
     
  9. Cabe

    Cabe New Member

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    looking at the cost there would be no point

    the fluronert needs replaceing regularly, it would be cheaper to risk a board death than pay out more for something that will stop it happening in the *possible* event of a leak
     
  10. bee2643

    bee2643 New Member

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    hrm
    why need replacing regularily?
     
  11. TetarZ

    TetarZ New Member

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    Okay to answer distilled water is dielectric it jus thas to stay very pure (or else you'll get nice fireworks...)
    Checkout
    robotics.net the guys has done someimpressive tests...
     
  12. pheonix

    pheonix Toot Toot!

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    Yep distilled water is good, no ions, shouldn't conduct alot therefore its alot safer.

    However bear in mind that as soon as it comes into contact with metal, it will start picking up ions, for example from your waterblock

    Theres not alot you can do about it. Just make SURE there are no leaks. Zip ties are good ways of adding more protection against leaks.
     
  13. TetarZ

    TetarZ New Member

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    I would rather use mineral oil. It more disgusting (Imagine the day you'd wanna change your Mobo Yuk!) but you don't get all the hassle from Ions...
    Mind you though I heard it can react badly with some types of plastic (according to wich type of oil you take).Yur PSU might not like it.

    It's how they cool those big transformers in stations (ie:"Transformer oil").

    What are zip tie by the way???
     
  14. Transic

    Transic New Member

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