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Cooling DIY CPU Waterblock (includes Pics)

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by AussieJester, 21 Jul 2006.

  1. AussieJester

    AussieJester New Member

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    G'day fellow bit-tech people, I was told about the site by another Aussie modder defyant who suggested I join up and pop up a few of my 'projects'

    I have been making my own waterblocks for more than a few years now and recently made a thread on Oz Case Modz & OCAU detailing the construction of cpu waterblocks using common modding tools ie. a dremel and a drill. I thought I would post it up here on bit-tech for all those that might be contemplating having a bash at there own DIY blocks.

    The block is made up of 6mm copper (for the base) and 20mm acrylic perspex (for the top) 1/2 inch brass fittings are used obviously 3/8inch fittings could be substituted. The block is marked, cut, measured, drilled then dremeled..I think I shall pop the pics up they are fairly self explanitory, will be more than happy to answer any questions -->

    note* this block was one of 3 i fabricated that day...the other two were for customers hence the first few pics showing 3 bases cut :)

    [​IMG]

    I also have a couple more 'close-ups' of the channelling-->

    [​IMG]

    This particular block took under 2 hours to fabricate and has since been fitted to a AMD4400 cpu, the PC this is mounted (heavily modded and worth checking out for those into case modding) in also runs a DIY gpu waterblock mounted on a 7900GT made by myself...I have also uploaded the fabrication pics of this on bit-tech also :)

    Temps range from 28-29degrees idle to 37-38 underload while gaming. The system runs a Toyota Camry Heater core along with a Swiftech MCP350 pump which I have also modded along with a DIY GPU Waterblock fabricated by myself, the pics of these I have also uploaded onto bit-tech for those interested in checking them out, lotz of plexi lit with LEDs :p

    Incidently cost for this waterblock is under $20 and took little under 2 hours to fabricate :)

    Hope all that viewed this thread found it of interest...
     
    Last edited: 21 Jul 2006
  2. LVMike

    LVMike New Member

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    nice... im very very impressed. What tools did you use in the fab of your different kits. thouse temps are damn nice. and the quality of workmen ship is top notch. congrats
     
  3. AussieJester

    AussieJester New Member

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    For the blocks as far as machinery a dremel, bandsaw, Linisher and a bench drill...the blocks can be made using only a drill a hacksaw and a dremel though which was basically the whole point of the post inistially to show a very good performing block could be made using 'standard' case modding equipment for under $AU20 :)

    Thankyou also for you positive feeback much appreciated LVMike :)

    EDIT: I guess I should also mention I make these block for people upon request, I charge $AU60 Dollars for the CPU block as seen in the above post plus $AU5 postage (within OZ) $AU15 postage outside of OZ... I also am able to make custom Acrylic tops in design of yours choice LEDs are $AU5 extra ea. Blocks can be made with adapter plate to suit socket of your choice, blocks are shipped no longer than 3 business days after payment is recieved...anyone interested in purchasing a "AussieBlock" can email me at aussiejester@westnet.com.au PayPal is an accepted form of payment :)
     
    Last edited: 22 Jul 2006
  4. Kenta

    Kenta New Member

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    That's CRAZY NICE worksmanship!
    Im clumsy as hell, wouldnt even try to create my own.. That one looks really neat.
    I wish i was crafty myself, would have tried to make my own one too :)

    Great job man, keep it up.
    BTW, u could turn that into a business of yours :)
     
  5. M_D_K

    M_D_K Active Member

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    might of missed this bit but what stops your block pissing water everywhere i don't see an oring or any sealent of anykind ?



    morgan.
     
  6. modster

    modster New Member

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    i see the gasket... there is a black layer between the copper and the acrylic. i guess its burna pad or something
     
  7. Ramble

    Ramble Ginger Nut

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    Nice.
    The base looks pretty thick to me, I bet you could shave off a few degrees by making it (far) thinner.
     
  8. Captain Slug

    Captain Slug Infinite Patience

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    Looks fairly thin based on picture #14. Optimally you want a coppe piece with a total thickness between 3/16" and 1/4" and then have as thin of a base as possible without making it too fragile (1.5mm or 2mm seems to work best).
     
  9. hydro_electric_655

    hydro_electric_655 Dremelly Dude

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    The thinker the copper the better stability in the temp is. Really the larger the copper part the better. Now you bring up the point of wieght but a good copper block even a large on is sitll lighter than any airheatsink. But I had an idea to just seal around a heatsink and pump water through it.
     
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