1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Finish degree or do something else?

Discussion in 'Serious' started by Igniseus, 6 Dec 2009.

  1. Bogomip

    Bogomip ... Yo Momma

    Joined:
    15 Jun 2002
    Posts:
    5,161
    Likes Received:
    39
    But he hasn't the will to finish as far as he can first time round soooo... :p
     
  2. Igniseus

    Igniseus New Member

    Joined:
    5 Mar 2006
    Posts:
    272
    Likes Received:
    3
    I was actually only pointing out that it was possible to return, not suggesting that I may or may not :p
     
  3. DarkLord7854

    DarkLord7854 New Member

    Joined:
    22 Jun 2005
    Posts:
    4,643
    Likes Received:
    121

    He's already stated he does have a degree, just getting buried in the workload for the second.

    I personally would rather lighten my load then forge on ahead stubbornly, that's just a recipe for disaster if you already know you're not going to make it yet refuse to give up, your will may not waiver, but your mental and physical health will.
     
  4. eek

    eek CAMRA ***.

    Joined:
    23 Jan 2002
    Posts:
    1,600
    Likes Received:
    14
    Why not continue with the degree and start applying for jobs and other things? If something comes up and you pass the interview then quit the degree and start work, at least you have your degree to fall back on if it comes to nothing.

    Getting a 3rd is not the end of the world. Sure there are better grades out there, but just by having a degree you'll be one up on some people when it comes to getting a job once you've finished.
     
  5. DarkLord7854

    DarkLord7854 New Member

    Joined:
    22 Jun 2005
    Posts:
    4,643
    Likes Received:
    121
    He already has a degree..
     
  6. eek

    eek CAMRA ***.

    Joined:
    23 Jan 2002
    Posts:
    1,600
    Likes Received:
    14
    No need to be a smart ass ;) You know what a mean, a more worthwhile one :p :lol:
     
  7. nry

    nry Member

    Joined:
    1 Nov 2006
    Posts:
    513
    Likes Received:
    4
    I am currently a part time freelance web developer mainly concentrating on the back end of websites (PHP & mySQL). I am in my 3rd year of my degree (which has nothing to do with web design really).

    Now I have already planned to continue to work freelance and maybe even set my own business up in the future. Would suggest this to you but looks like you don't have the time nor the skills good enough to secure any contracts.

    In my opinion you should speak to someone at uni maybe, seems a bit of a joke that you have that much work in your first year? I don't know a single person that has had that much work in their first year.
    Having a degree will make your life much easier in the future, this is the only reason im continuing with mine (I can't stand it btw), it looks good on your CV even if its completely unrelated to the line of work.
     
  8. Igniseus

    Igniseus New Member

    Joined:
    5 Mar 2006
    Posts:
    272
    Likes Received:
    3
    It's the 3rd/last year :) I have completed the foundation degree, this is the top-up final year that would upgrade the foundation to BSc Hons. I didn't actually have the grades to go straight onto the Bsc Hons Degree.
     
  9. nry

    nry Member

    Joined:
    1 Nov 2006
    Posts:
    513
    Likes Received:
    4
    Do you not think its worth the hassle to get it finished?
    As stressful as it might be, its only a year which will set you up for life

    Just my opinion really
     
  10. cjmUK

    cjmUK Old git.

    Joined:
    9 Feb 2004
    Posts:
    2,553
    Likes Received:
    88
    I'm a bit late into the fray, but what the hell...

    I disagree with DarkLord - there isn't that much web work around, certainly not since the downturn. And the problem is compounded by the low entry-level requirements of the field - anyone can download Visual Studio Express and call themselves a web developer. There are far too many people in this industry who are one-dimensional. It's not just about coding; planning, management, assessing risk, communicating with technical and non-technical users are all arguably just as important.


    What could a failure to complete the course mean to an employer?

    Lazy?
    Not broadly skilled?
    Inefficient or slow worker?
    Poor time management?
    Might be a great coder but poor at communicating, reporting and documenting?
    Fickle and disinterested?
    Easily distracted?
    No intellectual stamina?

    Part of the benefit of a degree is that it is an achievement that shows that the candidate has applied himself to his work, has demonstrated an aptitude for learning and a certain level of skill in a number of areas. Degrees are supposed to be hard - if not they are worth nothing.

    I'm not saying the OP is inadequate in anyway - but the proof of the pudding will be in persevering to a good grade. If he knuckles down and tries his best but still can't hack it, then maybe he's not going to go as far as he would like in this field. If he manages to get through to the end, he will have achieved something that will provide a good foundation to the first part of his career.
     
  11. Igniseus

    Igniseus New Member

    Joined:
    5 Mar 2006
    Posts:
    272
    Likes Received:
    3
    I completed the course a signed up for initially though, I just don't think I'm cut out for all this report writing and theory of this top-up year, if it was actually PC/technically oriented I would do amazingly well. And I wouldn't tell employers about the 2 months of Uni, that would be silly, and 2 months is easy to hide.
     
  12. cjmUK

    cjmUK Old git.

    Joined:
    9 Feb 2004
    Posts:
    2,553
    Likes Received:
    88
    OK, I accept that you can cover it up. But don't you think the theoretical stuff is important?

    Back in the day, programmers worked against tight specifications as described by Systems Analysts - they simply programmed what the analyst described. These days that distinction is gone - programmers are usually now considered 'developers' and require a much greater skillset, including business acumen, legal knowledge, oral and written skills, management skills, estimating and planning skills.

    Being a l33t coder won't get you off the bottom rung these days.

    If you don't pick up these skills at Uni, you will have to learn them on the job - if you aren't very good at them, you won't go very far.

    I'm not meaning to be harsh. You can have a fulfilling career in IT without a degree but a degree helps and you are just going to have to cover the same ground anyway.
     
  13. Igniseus

    Igniseus New Member

    Joined:
    5 Mar 2006
    Posts:
    272
    Likes Received:
    3
    I completely understand what your saying, but I can assure you, the majority of what were being taught is more or less useless :p I know this because I have shown what we are learning to friends and family in the industry. In theory these modules should be teaching us useful stuff, but my course is so messed up (agreed by all students) its just a waste. Most of the lecturers are clueless too. Our ASP.NET tutor only seems to know 1.1, and hasn't touched it for years. Our PHP tutor couldn't answer the vast majority of our questions. Our Systems Strategy tutor is borderline crazy (no joke). The list goes on... it sucks.

    I can honestly say that if I stuck out the year, I would have gained VERY little knowledge useful for a real job, besides the ASP.NET module (which is basically self-taught...), and my grade, if I got one, would be poor anyway, so IMO not worth sticking it out just for the piece of paper at the end.

    Now if only I went to another Uni, things MAY have been different.....ah well.
     
  14. eddie543

    eddie543 Snake eyes

    Joined:
    24 Apr 2009
    Posts:
    264
    Likes Received:
    23
    corrected.
     
  15. MacWalka

    MacWalka New Member

    Joined:
    4 Nov 2009
    Posts:
    361
    Likes Received:
    10
    So why not move uni then?

    Sounds like you're resigned to leaving, don't see why you can't apply to another uni. I imagine if you sent another uni you want to go to a portfolio and a begging letter, you could start there next year? Might mean a wasted year but you could work on your skills by yourself to apply to a new uni.
     
  16. Igniseus

    Igniseus New Member

    Joined:
    5 Mar 2006
    Posts:
    272
    Likes Received:
    3
    I currently live at home to go to my Uni, and cant really afford to move out for the final year somewhere else.
     
  17. MacWalka

    MacWalka New Member

    Joined:
    4 Nov 2009
    Posts:
    361
    Likes Received:
    10
    No other unis nearby?

    Theres grants, loans, bank overdrafts. But I would recommend not getting into debt unless you are very confident of being able to get a good job and able to pay it off quickly once you graduate.
     
  18. Molajoku

    Molajoku New Member

    Joined:
    20 Mar 2007
    Posts:
    29
    Likes Received:
    0
    Friend of mine passed his computing degree with a 3rd. He works in a school now as IT tech guy. It doesn't sound glamorous but he basically gets to build pc or two, install a print cartridge, and maybe transfer some files from a usb stick for a teacher or something in a week. Rest of the time he just arses about playing quake/wow with the other tech guys or reading novels. At the same time the school sends him on every qualification course he asks for so his CV looks sweet :) not bad for a 3rd.

    Really think about what you want to go and do is my advice. You could transfer to another computing course that suits you better, find one which does a sandwich year allowing you to go on an industrial placement so you can get a feel for the work you are gearing yourself up for. Or think about another course all together. Another friend of mine from Uni started doing the same computing course as me but really didn't like it that much so he moved on to do forensic sciences and loves it.

    Don't worry about loans etc, I'm on £12k atm paying back around £60 a month which is nothing really. Think about another Uni if the one you are at doesn't do what you really want, moving away and making new friends etc is what uni experience should be all about.
     
    Last edited: 9 Dec 2009
  19. Bogomip

    Bogomip ... Yo Momma

    Joined:
    15 Jun 2002
    Posts:
    5,161
    Likes Received:
    39
    Overqualified.

    Igniseus, you were resigned to leaving when you started this thread, just quit and find out how hard irl can be :)
     
  20. Igniseus

    Igniseus New Member

    Joined:
    5 Mar 2006
    Posts:
    272
    Likes Received:
    3
    I genuinely wasn't at all, but with a few replies from people with similar experiences and I quickly started to be tempted.

    What's with all the pro-Uni these days anyway? People seem to make out that you cant have a decent life without it, that it will be a complete struggle without. I understand the pro's and con's but I find it a little hard to believe that it would be that hellish without a BSc Hons?
    IMO a real job would probably have taught me all 2.5 years of Uni knowledge in less than 6 months anyway, kinda wish I went straight into an apprenticeship after School, would have given me 7 years work experience by end of Uni, as opposed to 0 and a piece of paper.
     

Share This Page