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News Finland to make broadband a legal right

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by CardJoe, 15 Oct 2009.

  1. Star*Dagger

    Star*Dagger New Member

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    You can not ( or should not be able to) throttle a Right.
    Make sure that you read the fine print and ask them specifically in writing (and get the response in writing) as regards to throttling.
    If you have a choice go with another company, if not explain to them that what they are doing is illegal or at very least unethical.
     
  2. LucusLoC

    LucusLoC New Member

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    @star*dagger: what, no right to self defence or defence of loved ones?

    iternet, food, clothing, shelter, education (unless it is self education) and medical care are all things ther require effort on the part of someone else (unless you do it yourself). for that reason they cannot be a basic human right. if they are then you are saying it is a basic human right to exploit another human to provide for your needs (or not, internet is not a survival issue). you shold always have a right to have opportunity get yourt own, but you should never have the right to forcefuly take it. sucess in the matter is up to the individual.

    things like free speach, freedom of vocation, freedom to defend oneself, freedom to participate in government (right to assembly), equity under the law, and the freedom to pursue (not be given, mind you) happyness are all thing that are basic rights, and do not require the labors of others.

    now there are things that need to be given for the common good, like provinding a fair legal system, provide for the common defence, and provide a fair and competative market place, but all of those require verry little be given from each individual, and benifit all. what is mostly needed is just enough to maintain a simple set of laws and a well stocked military. say about 7 to 10% GDP for the lot. when you satrt getting into providing shelter, food, medical care, internet etc. you get into the 40-60% + GDP. that and the fact that you take away any motivaation to work. if i have food, shelter and internet, what motivation do i have to work? that is all my basic needs + entertainment. scratch one productive memeber of society right there.
     
  3. ZERO <ibis>

    ZERO <ibis> Member

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    In the us it is more like oh here is 100mb internet but oh if you want to transfer more than 10gb then we are going to need an extra 1g$

    Also who needs freedom or liberty when you can have things given to you for FREE! I mean the people in the USSR and in Italy and Germany 70 years ago were way better off.
     
  4. null_x86

    null_x86 Thread Closer

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    This is good. Finland is basically sticking it to the man, with how the EU laws are doing the three strike thing, they say no. Nice Finland! +1 Now only if USA would get the idea.. whats that, USA is now like China? crap...
    time to move.
     
  5. antiHero

    antiHero ReliXmas time!

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    If you are a EU member its pretty easy as you have the right to work in any EU country of your choice. If you are not a EU member than its lil harder as you only get a residents permit if you have a job. Or you ask for asylum.

    I know a lot of foreigners who moved here for various reasons and most of them sad its pretty hassle free. On the other hand learning finnish is horrible as its a REALLY hard language.
    But in basic live you can get by pretty good with english only
     
  6. DOA Draven

    DOA Draven New Member

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    If the UK Govt puts 50p Phone Tax in place to aid the 'Private Companies' to exand the internet access to remote areas, how long before it goes the same way a Road tax, which is meant to fund the roads and transport infrastructure?
     
  7. BentAnat

    BentAnat Software Dev

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    erm... yah. i wish they'd do something here.
    Or just privatise the telecoms market here... that'd work as well.
    1Meg.... /dream...
     
  8. NeedlesKane

    NeedlesKane You're a Dremel

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    I live in the UK and have 50mb broadband with virgin media. The thought of being able to have installed wherever i move around the country is a nice thought, as i have found myself moving flats a few times recently and its a worrying thought being tied in to a 12 month contract and not being able to use it. last i heard virgin were piloting a 200mb scheme.
     
  9. eddtox

    eddtox Homo Interneticus

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    I think this is more interesting as a means of preventing people from being banned from the internet rather than giving everybody the internet for free.

    Couple of quick thoughts though:
    Does this mean access to the whole internet (i.e: if you have basic right to the internet then it is illegal for them to restrict sites?)
    What about people who are in prison for computer crimes?

    sorry for rambling
     
  10. frojoe

    frojoe New Member

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    I don't think this will stop them from restricting access for anyone breaking the law. Once you break the law, they can take you freedoms away. (ie. prison) They will still end your connection if you hack credit card data, infringe copyright, etc. As far as this stopping them from restricting access to certain sites, do they do that anyway? I havn't heard of anyone besides China and other more extreme governments blocking access to parts of the web, and the individual websites are protected under free speech for the most part. More perfection from the government never hurt though.(that's protecting us from the government, not them providing protection for us)
     
  11. Cerberus90

    Cerberus90 Car Spannerer

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    I want to live in Finland too now, :D

    And I don't agree with that Digital Divide thing, I mean, we're pretty well off, but as we live in a little village, the internet is pretty crap, 2MB is the fastest we can get.

    Can't see the UK gov doing this, I mean they'd have to spend money to do this, so completey out of the question. They'd probably do it if they made anyone who wanted it pay a huge monthly fee, :D, oh wait.
     
  12. quake1-rules

    quake1-rules New Member

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    I don't know the funding details but don't think that the Finnish aren't paying for it. The Finnish authorities use coercion to get this. The phrase "the end justifies the means" applies here. I know, I know.... You all want it and you want it NOW and you are perfectly willing to sacrifice freedoms for security (of broadband).
     
  13. frontline

    frontline Punish Your Machine

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    Damn, the Finnish are so proud of their online gaming skills they are wanting more players to dominate Europe! :)
     
  14. adidan

    adidan Guesswork is still work

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    To be honest, that sounds like quite a vacuous statement so I'd be interested to know what you mean by that, that is, by what means does this "coercion" manifest itself?
     
  15. thehippoz

    thehippoz New Member

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    all I know about finland is.. when I was in highschool, freshman- this hot chick showed up wearing practically lingerie to school.. finland foreign exchange student
     
  16. Timmy_the_tortoise

    Timmy_the_tortoise International Man of Awesome

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    Sounds sweet.

    I love Finland.
     
  17. Sir Digby

    Sir Digby The Supprising Adventures

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    Um, wouldn't she be 12 if she was a high school freshman? :eyebrow:
     
  18. thehippoz

    thehippoz New Member

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    lol maybe in england digby.. you guys have 12 year old freshman?

    I remember she lived in the same complex we did.. even went over her place once with my friends to see some artwork =] she used to wear these skimpy almost see through outfits to school.. everyone used to gawk

    there was a family from england in our complex too- nice people
     
  19. Sir Digby

    Sir Digby The Supprising Adventures

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    In the first year of secondary school in England we'd have people who are 11 starting.

    However I must apologise, I'd assumed that American high school started and ended at the same time that English secondary school + 6th form would. Research suggests different :)
     
  20. thehippoz

    thehippoz New Member

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    they still separate the k-6 from 7-8, the elementary kids still get alot of influence (bad influence usually) from the upper grades

    I just remember thinking back then- man finland must be awesome rofl could see in my teenage eyes a sea of chicks walking around with see through underwear :D
     
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