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HTPC HP 40L PVR Function

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by stepea, 8 Jul 2012.

  1. stepea

    stepea What's a Dremel?

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    Bought a HP Proliant 40L some months ago - I use it as a server for files accessed to an Acer Revo using XBMC. I've had a thought of adding PVR function to the HP 40L instead of the Revo and just using the record function then using XBMC to play the recordings. Any idea of what hardware I'd need. OS for the server is Windows 2008.
     
  2. dunx

    dunx ITX is where it's at !

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    What source ?
     
  3. faugusztin

    faugusztin I *am* the guy with two left hands

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    Add a TV card for your specific source, add Mediaportal (if you use Windows) or MythTV (if you use Linux), configure Mediaportal/MythTV, install XBMC-PVR, configure XBMC-PVR.
     
  4. stepea

    stepea What's a Dremel?

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    I'm not really interested in adding PVR function to the Revo and watch TV through that. Just wanted to setup recordings through the HP server (with added hardware) then access the files created throughout my network. Just wondered the best hardware to achieve this.
     
  5. faugusztin

    faugusztin I *am* the guy with two left hands

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    Again, back to the question - what source ?

    For DVB-T2 you need a DVB-T2 card (Freeview, other terrestrial TV services).
    For DVB-C you need a DVB-C card (cable TV)
    For DVB-S/S2 you need a DVB-S/S2 card. (Freesat, other satellite TV services)

    So, what is your source ?

    On software side, i point you back to MediaPortal and MythTV. They both can create recordings (usually in the streaming format from the provider, which most times means M2TS for a MPEG2 stream. Then they both can automatically transcode them to the required format and/or resolution, usually with commercial skipping.
     
  6. stepea

    stepea What's a Dremel?

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    Sorry I didn't answer that question - it would be freeview. I have got an coax lead coming out of the back of a Satellite HD Box (RF Out).
     
  7. faugusztin

    faugusztin I *am* the guy with two left hands

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    Huh ? Satellite HD Box ? That shouldn't give you DVB-T. That either gives you analog, or DVB-S(2) passthrough.
     
  8. stepea

    stepea What's a Dremel?

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    It's a UK Satellite HD Box with RF out that goes to Samsung TV. I guess I could split the cable coming from the outside aerial so one cable goes in the back of the Satellite Receiver and the other goes into the back of the TV Card (which I intend to buy and stick into the HP 40L).

    Is that any help ?
     
  9. faugusztin

    faugusztin I *am* the guy with two left hands

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    You got two options :
    1. split the standard analog TV signal after your satellite box.
      Advantages: cheap solution.
      Disadvantages: you can watch/record only the same channel as you watch on the TV (which you selected on the satellite box).
      Hardware needed: PCI-E analog TV card, TV signal splitter, coax cable.
    2. separate digital receiver.
      Advantages: you can watch/record any channel you can receive/decode.
      Disadvantages: expensive
      Hardware needed: secondary LNB on your satellite dish (or secondary dish with secondary LNB), cable from the LNB to your computer, PCI-E DVB-S2 card.
     
  10. stepea

    stepea What's a Dremel?

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    Surely I could split the signal from the aerial before it reaches the Sky HD receiver.
     
  11. faugusztin

    faugusztin I *am* the guy with two left hands

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    No, you couldn't. Each receiver (that means every box, every DVB-S card) needs separate connection to LNB, separate cable right up to that thing on the dish (LNB). If you have 2 receivers (a box and a DVB-S card), you need a LNB with 2 outputs. It is explained here :
    http://www.radioandtelly.co.uk/lnb.html

    And if the DVB-S stream is encoded, then you need separate CI card/CA module as well.
     
  12. stepea

    stepea What's a Dremel?

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    I'm not talking about a satellite signal, I realise you can't just split the signal without additional LNB, I'm thinking of HD Freeview. Split the signal from the Freeview aerial before it goes into the back of the Sky HD receiver.
     
  13. faugusztin

    faugusztin I *am* the guy with two left hands

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    I give up, sorry. You talk about Freeview (DVB-T), then about satellite HD box...

    In short :
    1) terestrial or cable signal (Analog, DVB-T, DVB-T2, DVB-C) - you can split the incoming signal, then connect it to your Analog/DVB-T/DVB-T2/DVB-C card. If decoding is needed, insert your CAM in CI slot connected to your card.
    2) satellite signal (DVB-S, DVB-S2) - you need separate LNB, separate cable, connect it to your DVB-S/DVB-S2 card. If decoding is needed, insert your CAM in CI slot connected to your card.

    In all cases you will then use software like MediaPortal or MythTV. You will first search for all channels, then configure EPG (in better case embedded in signal, in worse case downloaded from the internet using some scraper) and then schedule recordings using standard or web UI. Then depending on features of the program you choose you will transcode and/or commercial skip the recordings. Both of the software i mentoined offer live TV as well.

    Hardware - well, i leave that to UK people, as offerings differ. I personally use a Digital Devices CineCT v6 for my DVB-C cable TV (the card itself which is a dual DVB-T/DVB-C tuner, which i bought from Germany for ~200 euros).
     
  14. stepea

    stepea What's a Dremel?

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    Not sure why it's so difficult.

    The terrestrial signal goes into the SKY HD box (along with the Satellite signal) then into the back of the main set. Also there is a second RF out which another coax cable can be connected to a second TV - The same Satellite channel cannot be watched on more than one set.

    I mentioned about Satellite SKY HD Box but it was always the terrestrial signal I was interested in recording using PVR hardware, not the Satellite signal.
     
  15. faugusztin

    faugusztin I *am* the guy with two left hands

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    The answer is still in that post :). And as i said, i expect some others to give you exact hardware to use. I think people here were talking about the BlackGold cards sold at scan, as there is not that much DVB-T2 (HD) cards - most countries still use DVB-T.
     
  16. stepea

    stepea What's a Dremel?

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    OK, thanks. I'll have a look at Blackgold cards.
     

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