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CPU i3-3225 vs A10-5800k @ 1920x1080

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by WhiteKnight226, 13 Jan 2013.

  1. WhiteKnight226

    WhiteKnight226 Member

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    I'm looking to purchase one of these two CPU.
    Main purpose is web browsing, MS Office, and youtube.
    No Gaming
    I will not be using an actual stand alone GPU. Integrated graphics only.

    It will be on a 21inch monitor. Can Intels HD4000 graphics handle that?

    From what I have been reading is that the A10 has vastly superior graphics, while the i3 is better for pretty much everything else.

    I just wanted to get some opinions on which is better for the above listed tasks. I know the A10 is unlocked but I don't need to OC, looking for the more power efficient as well as the quieter one. Thanks!
     
    Last edited: 13 Jan 2013
  2. mrbungle

    mrbungle Undercooked chicken giver

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    For desktop work i3 everytime.
     
  3. Harlequin

    Harlequin Well-Known Member

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    if your not gaming then both will give you a good experience ; the A10 has better gfx and the i3 has better cpu
     
  4. jrs77

    jrs77 Well-Known Member

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    For a pure office-media PC the i3-3225 will be the better option. It has only half the TDP of the A10-5800k and is way easier to cool, i.e. way more silent.

    I'd even go even lower TDP and grab an i3-3220T. Allthough it has only HD2500 graphics it'll still be more then enough for browsing, office and HD-video-playback.
     
  5. rollo

    rollo Well-Known Member

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    the above poster has it spot on, i3-3220T is more than enough for an office build.
     
  6. Harlequin

    Harlequin Well-Known Member

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    I run my 125w phenom X6 passively (coolermaster Z600) , so how much lower tdp do you need to go??
     
  7. jrs77

    jrs77 Well-Known Member

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    As low as possible ofc.

    My old Zotac IONITX-A-E is still up to all the tasks the OP requested, allthough you notice the low-power Atom 330 in bigger office-files. And this three-year old system does playback a 1080p BluRay at only 40W measured on the wallplug, i.e. the whole HTPC!

    EDIT: The CPUs are allways announced with TDP, which actually means thermal design point, but I refer to it as power drawn. jfyi
     
  8. mm vr

    mm vr The cheesecake is a lie

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    Easily. Even a HD2000 (on a Sandy Bridge Celeron or Pentium) can handle web browsing and office work.
     
  9. Guest-23315

    Guest-23315 Guest

    QFT.
     
  10. mm vr

    mm vr The cheesecake is a lie

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    Personally I'd avoid the 'T' chips, because basically you are paying extra for a factory underclock. If you really need lower power consumption, you can underclock manually, though I'd argue you won't want to do that after you've seen how cool they run. Intel overestimates TDP.
     
  11. jrs77

    jrs77 Well-Known Member

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    You can't underclock the new intel Core-CPUs. Only the "K"-models support this.
     
  12. mm vr

    mm vr The cheesecake is a lie

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    Hmm, I recall being able to lower the multiplier on a non-'K' Sandy Bridge system. I can double check it when I get home.

    But in any case, you are paying extra for an underclock. :)

    And as said, Intel overestimates TDP. Most dual core Sandy Bridge chips are rated at 65W TDP, but a G550 I have pulls around 25W on full load.
     
  13. Landy_Ed

    Landy_Ed Combat Novice

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    Ignoring the intel v AMD argument, which on pure processing power the Intel wins every time....

    Perhaps a silly question, but why compare to the 5800k if you don't want to overclock? TDP of the 5700 is a mere 65w, and for the usage you're describing I'd have thought the even cheaper A8 5500 would do just fine.
     
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  14. jrs77

    jrs77 Well-Known Member

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    Hmm... as far as I know you can't modify the multiplier of the non-"K" chips.


    If we go there, then even an AMD A4-5300 can handle all the tasks requested by the OP. And this CPU is dirt-cheap at €45. Get an ASRock FM2A75M-ITX for €80, some 4GB Kingston DDR1333 HyperX for €30 and an Antec ISK 310-150 for €80. Add a 120GB SSD and a slimline DVD and you're looking at a tiny office-media PC for €350.

    If you go with µATX you can cut maybe another €30-50 off the price, but I don't see the reason to have a big µATX-tower on your desk for that pricedifference.
     
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  15. rollo

    rollo Well-Known Member

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    Assuming you dont have all the bits already which it sounds like you dont. Consider the below.

    Just go to dell buy a box of them for £299 for a basic starter £399 for the i5 version add monitor task complete. Will work out cheaper than anything brought and built yourself would. and you even get the door to door ease of warranty.

    And for the tasks its doing its more than enough performance and quiet to boot.

    Cause once you add monitor OS keyboard mouse speakers/headset. ( if you dont own win 7/8 your looking at £180 for the extras) if you dont have them your BOM just scales through the roof.

    Easy for us to say on here you can spec something for similar money but if you miss all the vital things for it to work then its not really counting as working is it. ( i personally have many of the extras as spares but i dout that many do)
     
  16. Landy_Ed

    Landy_Ed Combat Novice

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    +1 JRS, I was just sticking with the quad core theme!
     
  17. WhiteKnight226

    WhiteKnight226 Member

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    I'm just trying to build the fastest PC possible. I just purchased a 120gb Samsung 840 SSD I got on sale for $90
    Seen here: http:http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820147188
    Customer reviews for it were nice.

    Personally, I am an Intel fan.

    And the reason I started this was because after searching, I couldn't find any information about how the HD4000 runs at 1920x1080

    After seeing some of what has been said, I may go with a cheaper Sandy Bridge that has HD2000.

    The T series is sold out on Newegg so not even considering.
     
  18. mm vr

    mm vr The cheesecake is a lie

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    My personal research from a few months ago suggests the opposite. Additionally, you don't get an SSD or a proper power supply with a £299 Dell.
     
  19. WhiteKnight226

    WhiteKnight226 Member

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    Yea, plus I don't like cheap hardware. I used to own pre built PC's (Gateways and a Dell) and never had good experiences with them. One problem after another. And all their built in software is unwanted. After building my own PC, I've yet to have an issue and I love knowing everything that's in it!
     
  20. mm vr

    mm vr The cheesecake is a lie

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    I checked this by the way and I was able to freely choose the multiplier between 16 and 26 on a system with a Celeron G550 on an ASRock B75 Pro3-M.
     

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