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News IBM and TDK partner up to make MRAM

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Tim S, 23 Aug 2007.

  1. Tim S

    Tim S OG

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  2. mmorgue

    mmorgue New Member

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    Sounds very promising, once the storage capacities increase to more real-world requirements.
     
  3. Almightyrastus

    Almightyrastus Rule #9

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    will be interesting to see how the power usage turns out as well esp if there are possible plans to replace hard drives at some point in the future. Of course power usage will also affect heat and as a result access speeds.
     
  4. Bluephoenix

    Bluephoenix Spoon? What spoon?

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    I want to see how they plan to sheild against severe EMI and outside sources of magnetism.

    if they can successfully do both then it might replace ECC memory in number crunching stations for CAD and the like, where the improved speed would lead to faster analysis times.
     
  5. pendragon

    pendragon I pickle they

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    I agree. This issue immediately lept to mind when I heard it was magnetic.
     
    Last edited: 23 Aug 2007
  6. -Xp-

    -Xp- Member

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    Interesting stuff! Good to see more alternatives to the old hard disk :)

    PS: noticed a typo in the last paragraph.

     
  7. Glider

    Glider /dev/null

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    Current HDs are magnetic too, and they seem to do fine?

    Faradays Cage to the rescue ;)
     
  8. completemadness

    completemadness New Member

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    I'm guessing that huge antiferromagnet (or whatever) has something to do with it not getting destroyed by EMR
     
  9. Bluephoenix

    Bluephoenix Spoon? What spoon?

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    a Harddrive is not that sensitive to magnetism when on or off because you have to drag a magnet across the disc (or across the side to it for perpendicular recording) to realign the cells and create read errors. with the MRAM, any severe EMI could cause a bit change (and subsequent read error) based upon the design shown.
     
  10. completemadness

    completemadness New Member

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    Correct

    I'm pretty sure that's wrong - you just have to move the particles through the magnetic field to destroy them, where you put the magnet (or the alignment of the cells) doesn't really matter
     
  11. Bluephoenix

    Bluephoenix Spoon? What spoon?

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    personally tried it with a half-dead disc, and it is indeed correct.
     
  12. completemadness

    completemadness New Member

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    whos right ? lol ;)
     
  13. Bluephoenix

    Bluephoenix Spoon? What spoon?

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    I meant that I tried running a magnet at 90 degrees to the disc, on a half dead perpendicular recording drive, and more sectors turned up with errors.

    so that would be me who's right.


    but you did have a point, which is why I resorted to physical testing in the first place! :D
     
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