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News IBM: Graphene won't replace silicon in CPUs

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Claave, 21 Jan 2011.

  1. LightningPete

    LightningPete Diagnosis: ARMAII-Holic

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    Can anyone see Nvidia looking at this for its next GPU, that runs at stupid amounts of Ghz and this time with much less heat. I do!

    lol

    Obviously im talking in the next 50 years when we have CPU's even turning the window wipers on our cars and the ironing been automatically done when we think about it because of the Intel stamped chip lodged into our heads, and the words GOO and GLE appearing in both our eyes.

    Ohh did i forget to mention we wear and eat and live in a house full of Tesco branded stuff?

    Yep you guessed it.

    TESINTEGOOO-gle .... the new earth
     
  2. [USRF]Obiwan

    [USRF]Obiwan New Member

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    Basicly you have a Quantum computer like switch it can both be on and off. sort of Qubit on/off/on&off ..
    :+)
     
  3. ribrin55

    ribrin55 New Member

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    I am late to this but I was wondering if the switching issue could be handled by a form of carbon (pyrolytic graphite) that has severe anisotropy in its directional plane? i.e. one plane has resistance of 500 µΩcm and the other 0.5 Ωcm? It also has the same effects for thermal conductivity with 440 W/mk in one plane and 1.4 W/mK in another plane?
     
  4. cgthomas

    cgthomas Cpt. Handsome

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    The Earth used to be flat for several centuries. However, later on man learnt this isn't the case.
    My point is just because you don't have the knowledge now to turn off the transistor; it doesn't actually mean that it can't be done.

    What IBM mean to say is they're not smart enough (yet) to figure out how to achieve the dream chip, made of graphene.

    Or it could be a business strategy not to introduce graphene yet, as they want to profit as much as possible from the production of traditional silicon chips.

    Also, bear in mind that graphene chip production requires new equipment, new breed of scientists, OS developers need to know more about chips. It's a multi-billion dollar step for an industry that likes to grow in doubles each year so I don't think we'll see anything special in the near future.

    Chip producing companies are like pharmaceutical firms, they request a premium for products which don't cost much to produce on a large scale. Making money from dirt is a booming business!
     
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