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News IDC: SSD performance gap 'small'

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by CardJoe, 17 Jul 2008.

  1. CardJoe

    CardJoe Freelance Journalist

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  2. Dr. Strangelove

    Dr. Strangelove New Member

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    If the SSD's could match the performance of the faster (less energy efficient?) mechanical drives would we not be seeing SSD drives for desktops already?
     
  3. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    The 2.5" SATA SSDs work fine in a desktop - but are much more expensive per gigabyte. If you're asking why there aren't any 3.5" SATA SSDs, it's because it's a relatively small market currently (the main advantage for SSDs, shock resistance, doesn't apply to desktop computing) and because there's no need to make a bigger unit that will only fit in a desktop when you can make a smaller unit that fits in both laptops and desktops.
     
  4. Liquid K9

    Liquid K9 Human programmer.. heh

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    SSD's are still as-good-as-theoretical while the price per gigabyte gap is so immense....

    thats a difference of 2.99eur per gigabyte - or a 2,400% premium. still sound like a viable option to you? not me.
     
  5. iwod

    iwod New Member

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    One reason would be none of the current OS has optimization for SSD.
    SSD has a future for much greater speed. Intel has said their SSD is going to be 200+ MB/s ... although it still hasn't appeared yet.
     
  6. wuyanxu

    wuyanxu still wants Homeworld 3

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    Windows is optimised.

    putting Vista on Raptor greatly increases Windows smoothness, so putting on a high performance SSD should increase it even more.

    the "small gap" is just saying in comparison to high speed HDD, it's not a large improvement. after-all, current high speed HDD (veloci-Raptor) is already very fast
     
  7. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    In no sense of the word is Windows 'optimised' for anything, much less SSDs. By default, Windows writes a large quantity of temporary files to the boot volume - along with a pagefile containing data swapped out of RAM. This constant read/write cycle impacts on the SSD due to the limited number of writes available to Flash memory. Basically, running an unmodified OS on an SSD will result in an expensive paperweight in a short length of time.

    Now, you can turn the pagefile off and reduce the number of temporary files created (or move both to a mechanical volume), but that's something you have to do. Likewise, you can do the same in Linux and, I assume, MacOS. That doesn't make either of those 'optimised' for SSD use either - unless someone has already done so and released a special version, such as the SSD-optimised Eeebuntu Ubuntu variant designed for the Asus Eee PC.
     
  8. chicorasia

    chicorasia New Member

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    All speed and lifecycle issues aside, has anyone ever tried to recover data from a damaged SSD?

    If a controller chip burns out, can you still recover your data? Is there such a thing as a block-by-block clone of the SSD? How do software tools such as Data Rescue II cope with SSDs?
     
  9. desertstalker

    desertstalker Member

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    The manufacturers specify 10s of years if you write the entire contents of the SSD each day, (ie if you have a 128GB device and write 128GB of data to it each day it will last 10+ years). The problem of flash wearing out is almost a non issue these days.

    The wear levelling algorithms will ensure that individual sectors do not get prematurely destroyed by pagefiles etc.
     
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