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News Intel closes base clock loophole in latest microcode update

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Gareth Halfacree, 10 Feb 2016.

  1. Byron C

    Byron C And now a word from our sponsor

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    In a lot of ways, overclocking really hasn't changed all that much (at least the basic principles anyway): changing either the bus speed or the multiplier value to run higher than the design spec. Obviously modern processors are entirely different beasts, but I don't think we'll ever get back to the "good old days" of being able to adjust the multiplier or FSB value on pretty much any motherboard/CPU combo. These days more and more components are being subsumed into the CPU, they're more like SoCs than traditional processors. While that means smaller systems overall it also means that you have far less control over your hardware.

    I'm making myself nostalgic now. My favourite board/CPU combo from "the old days" was an Abit VP6 running two P3-800MHz chips at somewhere around 1GHz each; I had FOP-38 heatsinks with Delta "screamer" fans and when they ran at full tilt the noise was horrendous.
     
  2. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    I remember Deltas. I also remember the day when overclocking your PC involved replacing a physical crystal on the board... (Wasn't even that long ago, really: you could eke out more power from Amiga accelerator boards by swapping the crystal.)
     
  3. Byron C

    Byron C And now a word from our sponsor

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    Ah, now, your problem there was that you had the wrong system, you see - clearly what you should have had was the Atari STe... ;). Though I don't remember whether there were any accelerator addons for the STe, it only used the 68000 - the 680x0 Atari machines came in the form of the TT or the Falcon IIRC. I always wanted a Falcon...

    I do remember friends talking of overclocking Amiga accelerator boards back in the day; although we didn't use the same language/terms that we do now...
     
  4. Guest-16

    Guest-16 Guest

    Crystals. Jumpers. DIP Switches. BIOS. One-click button.
     
  5. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    Oh, there definitely were Atari ST/STFM/STe accelerators. Here's a list.
    Crystals. Jumpers. DIP switches. Physical 'TURBO' button on the case. BIOS. Dynamic underclocking. Dynamic overclocking. One-click button.
     
  6. Dan848

    Dan848 New Member

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    I apologize Spreadie, I just read your comment.

    AMD did produce a "486" CPU, however, they no longer had access to Intel microcode or die construction and was forced to come up with their own, and their 486 performance was worse than Intel. The same for Cyrix, except I do not remember them being partnered with Intel, and Cyrix performance was worse than AMD, and as you know Cyrix eventually died out in their effort to keep up with Intel.

    When Intel produced the Pentium, AMD was in the dark and had nothing to fall back on regarding Intel design from the 386 days. Eventually AMD did produce a very good product and that forced Intel into overdrive to make a better CPU and AMD has been playing catch-up since.
     
  7. Dan848

    Dan848 New Member

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    Years ago I had a friend that was a student at Ohio State University studying to be an electrical engineer. He ragged on me almost continually to get a computer. I told him that when computers could actually DO something I would get one. I could not afford a $10,000 dollar Intel machine and settled on an Atari. I think it was an early model SE series. It cost about $600 dollars I believe with an external 5.25" floppy drive. I used a 10 inch black and white TV for a monitor.

    I purchased Flight Simulator II, I believe it was version II, it could have been version I because it was not made by Microsoft, and a word processor that came with a spell checker [because my memory and therefore spelling went into the toilet after being wounded twice in the head in the Vietnam War].
     
  8. Guest-16

    Guest-16 Guest

    Disagree that TurboBoost and C1E are true, because they are chip features not user controlled :p

    Cyrix/IDT got bought by VIA. That legacy is still going.
     
  9. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    Maybe for users of Lesser OSen, but here in *NIX Land I have total control of when my CPU under/overclocks itself and by how much. :clap:
     

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