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Lockdown [Updated 8/30: Final Assembly]

Discussion in 'Project Logs' started by zackbass, 7 May 2005.

  1. zackbass

    zackbass What's a Dremel?

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    Today's tiny update:

    I've acutally done a ton of work on the case in the past two days, it's just that it's all monotonous and frustruating small stuff that doesn't look like a lot now that it's done.

    [​IMG]

    Here's the bottom panel of the case all screwed in. Each screwing assembly consists of a screw, a stainless steel tab to be welded to the case frame, and threaded steel block to be welded to the bottom panel, there are twelve of them holding the panel on.

    The worst part of the job was drilling the stainless steel tabs. If you aren't super careful stainless will burn up even the best drill bits in seconds (may my 1/4" cobalt bit rest in peace). I think I have the process pretty well figured out now between the spindle speed and stopping for cooling.

    Next we have today's work, the rear locking bolt assembly. Here are some super hot glamour shots:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    It came out perfectly except for the flat center section that looks off center because it wasn't made long enough (I forgot to add the edge finder radius when zeroing the piece), and I only had to do it over once! Now all I have to do is make the rest of the system look just like that.

    Edit: w00t! Two pages! No more waiting for the old images to load.
     
  2. Cardan

    Cardan What's a Dremel?

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    lookin good. cant wait to see this one finished
     
  3. frodo

    frodo What's a Dremel?

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    wow, this looks awesome, im liking your skills, and i also like the cars i see in the background of a shot or 2. hotrods PWN all other's!
     
  4. -Erik-

    -Erik- Guest

    Looking very nice indeed!

    Guess you dont want anybody touching your computer hehe hence this mod. Well so far it looks really secure once its done. No way you can unscrew those bolts now unless you use heavy force :p
     
  5. zackbass

    zackbass What's a Dremel?

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    Here we go with the night update. For some reason I'm twice as productive after 9pm, and because of that I got a lot of important stuff done. I didn't bother taking pictures along the way, so here's how it looks now:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    The big thing is that I got all the guide tubes in and by some miracle correctly. I say a miracle because all five of them need to be parallel so the rods don't bind. It all works quite smoothly, hopefully it'll last as I add in the front bolts. That second picture there is just showing off one of the guide tubes. For size reference, the hole in the tube is 1/2".

    I encountered one serious error while aligning everything. Somehow the lock handle rod got shifted 1/8" to the left side of the case. The error must have been there since I first put it in, it's just hard to believe that I didn't notice it. What this means is that every measurment must compensate for it. All that needed to be done with the rear locking assembly was widen the slot that accepts the handle rod and the accompanying hole (that conviently gets covered up). The main problem is that I'm uncertian how this will affect the front lever arms since it isn't perfectly symmetrical anymore. I'm thinking that the right front bolt will have a slightly larger range of motion than the left, hopefully it won't be significant.
     
  6. Cardan

    Cardan What's a Dremel?

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    uh oh... good luck with fixing that, hopefully everythign will go fine
     
  7. Captain Slug

    Captain Slug Infinite Patience

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    Man that thing is going to be heavy when it's finished. But that's kind of the point isn't it? :)
     
  8. McDoogle

    McDoogle What's a Dremel?

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    Good ideas, subscribed
     
  9. perplekks45

    perplekks45 LIKE AN ANIMAL!

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    Agree.

    :~subscribed.
     
  10. J-Pepper

    J-Pepper Minimodder

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    looks of metal work going here, it's going to be interesting...
     
  11. bootupbuddha

    bootupbuddha grunge modder

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    :jawdrop: ! all it takes is the right tools. (with a whole lot of skill thrown in) subscribe me please.
     
  12. Phaeton

    Phaeton What's a Dremel?

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    Very impressed with your welding skills. Another very original mod on these boards!

    Good luck
     
  13. zackbass

    zackbass What's a Dremel?

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    Breaking news: The lock bolt system actually works! (as in real stainless steel rods move back and forth) The job took much more work than I had planned, but I also worked a lot harder than I had planned so it all came out even.

    I changed the plans a bit on the fly and was able to eliminate the two extra arms simply by slotting the lever over the pivot. Here are the pics:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I also fit the top plate which puts down the foundation for the rest of the case. I still have to attach mounts to it somehow though.

    [​IMG]

    It's finally starting to look somewhat like a computer at this point:

    [​IMG]

    I also made a ton of progress in planning and getting the next few steps set up. I ordered the Lian Li motherboard standoffs and a PSU bracket just in case I need it. After a very long search I found the perfect radiator, the Fluidyne FHP-10026 and ordered two of them. It's an aftermarket oil cooler for high performance cars but it fits my dimensions exactly and even better than that has a tube/fin design that looks better than any radiator I've ever seen. I asked Fluidyne for some better pics since I had never seen anything like it, here they are:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    In the center of the second pic you can see what the inside of one of the tubes (the input branches into six of these) looks like. The turbulator design yields a tremendous surface area and looks perfect for the WC system. Better than all that, they're only $40 a piece. One of the big questions remaining about the WC system is whether to put the two rads in parallel or series. They look like they might be a bit restrictive so I'm leaning toward a parallel configuration.

    I also decided on a color scheme, I don't know why I thought of it, but as soon as I did it hit me like a ton of bricks. We're all geeks/nerds around here (if you aren't one must wonder exactly what you are doing here), so it's probaly safe to come right out and say it: It's going to be the red/orange/black/blue scheme of Canti from FLCL. That's right, a color scheme from a (totally awesome) anime series. Here's a reference pic for those that are clueless: http://www.animegalleries.net/albums/flcl/canti/flcl_canti0028.jpg
    Seriously, if that's not the best "case mod" I've ever seen, I don't know what is. I want the red and orange to be rich but slightly blinding and a use a dull blue and black. Now all I have to do is get my hands on my neighbor's PPG paint chip book.
     
  14. perplekks45

    perplekks45 LIKE AN ANIMAL!

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    Just one question: (sorry if it was mentioned earlier)
    Are you going to mount fans on that rad? If yes, how?
     
  15. zackbass

    zackbass What's a Dremel?

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    Nope, not a single fan in the entire system.
     
  16. frodo

    frodo What's a Dremel?

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    Wow, that rad will be perfect in a fanless system :D as theres so much surface area!
     
  17. kickarse

    kickarse What's a Dremel?

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    That is a perfect cooler.. They should have the same overall diameter as a normal tube type rad. There is just more surface area for the water to touch. I think you'll notice with flow tests that it'll be very similar and not restrictive at all.

    Great find, will use these on my watercooling project.

    They also have a 9 pass one too
    http://www.sportcompactonly.com/pro...&st=40&l=2&utm_source=froogle&utm_medium=shop
     
    Last edited: 15 Jul 2005
  18. Pegasus

    Pegasus What's a Dremel?

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    Now, that case is REALLY different.

    Love the plan of using the frames for water flow. Brilliant!!! :clap:

    I have one question though: With those rad's the water has plenty of chance to get rid of the heat.... however, does the air have a chance to absord the heat from the alu?

    Passive coolers seem to have outside fins as well; as the walls touching the air seems to more of the challenge than the water touching the walls of the cooler.

    Here's a couple of links to coolers designed for passive air cooling.
    Cape CORA and Howe Coolers

    Looking forward to seeing the rest of the mod. Keep up the good work! :thumb:
     
  19. zackbass

    zackbass What's a Dremel?

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    I just came in from more case work in the shop (it's 11:15pm local time) and got a lot of work done so here's an update.

    The top bottom plate is now mounted with screws. Not much to say about it except that my countersinking bit doesn't work on steel which made it a real pain to get all the screws to sit somewhat right. They still don't, but they're close enough.

    [​IMG]

    The big thing I got done was the motherboard tray mount. It may sound like a small thing but it was quite a project. I needed channel stock to fit the edges of the mobo tray so that it can slide in and out but nobody makes it in the size I need so I had to make it out of some aluminum angle.

    [​IMG]

    To make it I found a piece of steel that was the same size as the mobo try, sandwiched the aluminum angle between that and another piece of steel in the vise and went to town on it with a very large hammer.

    This is the mobo tray channel with its screw and mounting block attached. My countersink bit works quite nicely with aluminum.
    [​IMG]

    Channel all welded and screwed in:
    [​IMG]

    And the mobo tray slid in:
    [​IMG]

    I also played around the with the power supply waterblock and the prospects of getting the MOSFETs mounted securely don't look too good. I may have to rebuild the thing and relocate the chips to a more convient place.
     
  20. zackbass

    zackbass What's a Dremel?

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    I had two choices to get the angles I need in the door, the first was to make two bends by heating the sheet and bending it by hand, the second was to slice it up into three pieces and weld them together at the correct angles. Slicing it up wasn't too apprealing to me since I don't have a good way of cutting the panels, the best I have is a plasma cutter but that leaves a nasty oxidized area and I'm not very precise with it, so I went with the bending option.

    To do this I welded in two temporary pieces of angle iron to serve as bend points:
    [​IMG]

    Now the plate is attached to the top since this is where I'm going to start the bending process. This is because the top is the smallest flat section and wouldn't give enough leverage if I were to do it last.

    You might also notice enough vise grips to supply a small nation. They are easily one of the most essential tools I own, not only a third hand, but hands three through twenty.

    Here I am firing up the rosebud torch. It looks like I'm leaning back away from the torch pretty far there, it was already disgustingly hot today and the torch when running only on acetylene is unbearably hot by itself. It gets a lot better when the oxygen is added to the mix (much less infrared radiation is my best guess) but it's still extremely hot. The torch is actually a bit "overclocked" too, in order to get the kind of heat I needed for this job I had to bump up the gas pressure pretty far past normal. Of course, overclocking doesn't normally involve a tank of acetylene large enough to blow a house off its foundation.
    [​IMG]
    In the bottom left of the picture you can see one of my other projects, an aluminum bowler, sort of like oddjob would have worn.

    After seemingly an eternity of trying to get the bend area hot enough I was able to bend it. In reality this means I have turn the torch off as quickly as possible, throw it off to the side, and attempt to pull down on the sheet as hard as I can. I didn't quite get it the first time, but the vise grips finished what I couldn't.
    [​IMG]

    Now comes another essential part of the job, tacking the sheet to fit just right so I don't mess up the first bend as I attempt the second one. The sheet was also tacked at the top before the first bend so that it couldn't slip away from under the vise grips.
    [​IMG]

    And the final bend is done. You can see one of my other favorite shop tools, the long furniture maker's style clamp:
    [​IMG]

    I couldn't wait to see what it would look like with one of the radiators mounted, so here's a pic of that:
    [​IMG]

    And here's how it looks right now. I cut off the excess with the plasma cutter and finished the edge on the milling machine and bench grinder.
    [​IMG]

    The panel needs to have a lot of finishing work done to it, mainly getting the edges to line up with the frame correctly. That will be done by working the panel into the place with vise grips and tacking it in, then stress relieving the panel with the torch. Maybe I'll get that and the second panel done tomorrow.
     

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