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News Microsoft details Windows RT ARM-based laptop features

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Gareth Halfacree, 14 Aug 2012.

  1. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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  2. OWNED66

    OWNED66 New Member

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    " including Microsoft's own Surface tablet-cum-keyboard"

    ummm a cum keyboard ?
     
  3. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    Every time... <adds a point to the scoreboard>

    It's a linking word, derived from the Latin word for 'with.' Think summa cum laude, not cum shot, yah?

    EDIT: Besides, keyboard-cum-cover was funnier...
     
  4. schmidtbag

    schmidtbag New Member

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    Search for "with, together" in:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Greek_and_Latin_roots_in_English#C

    While the actual latin root is "cum", the English usage of the word is com.
     
  5. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    It really isn't, you know. It's definitely 'cum' in English. http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/26488/how-does-one-use-the-latin-word-cum-in-a-sentence

    If that's not enough for you, try the Oxford English Dictionary: Definition of cum: preposition [usually in combination]: combined with; also used as (used to describe things with a dual nature or function): a study-cum-bedroom (my emphasis.)

    I have *never* seen 'com' used as a linking word, on the other hand. Neither has the OED. It *is* used as a root - committee, for example - as indicated by the Wikipedia article you linked to, but that's completely different. If you actually *search* for 'cum' on Wikipedia, you'll find: An English linking word, derived from the Latin word for 'with.' It is used in many place names in England as well as in everyday English - e.g. Prestwich-cum-Oldham. Note that is not 'com.'

    Now, back on topic. How about those ARM-based laptops, eh?
     
    Last edited: 14 Aug 2012

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