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Planning My very first ATX crimp

Discussion in 'Modding' started by LePhuronn, 10 Dec 2019.

  1. LePhuronn

    LePhuronn Active Member

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    I don't suppose one of you lovely people could spot check my very first ATX crimp?

    [​IMG]
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    It looks fine to me, but what do I know? :grin:
     
  2. Impatience

    Impatience Active Member

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    Close contact held in the heat shrink and copper cabling, looks good to me!
     
  3. Big Elf

    Big Elf Oh no! Not another f----ing elf!

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    Which Crimp Tool are you using?

    The insulation crimp looks to have bitten down too deep into the insulation and the conductor crimp doesn't look to have formed fully around the wire. However if the crimp doesn't pull off it'll work.
     
  4. IanW

    IanW Grumpy Old Git

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    I've been doing this sort of thing for almost 30 years in my day job. That there is a first-rate looking crimp.
     
  5. Dr. Coin

    Dr. Coin Active Member

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    Looks better than most I make. Big Elfs comments are spot one but I have I found the more critical detail is to ensure that the pin wasn't bent during the crimping. I found it happens when something shifts during the crimp the a pin is not properly aligned with the crimper. When this happens I can usually remove the pin with a gentle tug.
     
  6. Big Elf

    Big Elf Oh no! Not another f----ing elf!

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    Although it's a personal thing I always pre-crimp my ATX pins even though it takes longer overall. That way I find it easier to orient the pin on the wire. Some people can get the pin orientated correctly on the wire without pre-crimping, sadly I'm not one of those people.
     
  7. LePhuronn

    LePhuronn Active Member

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    For some reason I wasn't getting notifications, so apologies for not replying.

    @Big Elf : I used the SN28B crimper I bought for Dupont connectors as a test. Seemed to be fine at first but hadn't noticed the insulation until you pointed it out, but it only "works" with the 18AWG ATX crimps. Gave it a good tug though and it's secure. However, it can't do anything with my SATA crimps and the wings on the 16AWG ATX crimps are too big. I'll be trying out my new crimper soon. The SN28B is still going to get lots of love though with all the custom front panel and LED rings I need to do.

    @IanW : thanks very much dude, this first stab was most encouraging.
     
  8. Big Elf

    Big Elf Oh no! Not another f----ing elf!

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    I modified my SN28B to stop it doing that by removing a small amount of metal from the back of one of the dies. Unfortunately it was so long ago that I've forgotten which die and how much to remove. It was probably around 0.5mm or less though.

    I did find that particular Crimp tool to be the best for crimping the terminals for 4 pin type Molex connectors until MDPC released their CTX3 which is the best I've used for all types of popular terminals.
     
  9. LePhuronn

    LePhuronn Active Member

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    Yup, I treated myself to the MDPC-X CTX3.
     
  10. Big Elf

    Big Elf Oh no! Not another f----ing elf!

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    I didn't pick up on this. Are you using the genuine SATA terminals? If so I had a lot of difficulty with those and some of the copy pins in that the wings would break on most of them, typically the insulation wings. I use the Molex 63811-1000 hand crimp tool for the SATA terminals. It's a bit pricey (and slow to use) but I prefer it for the SATA terminals and the smaller terminals, e.g. male and female fan pins and USB/motherboard male and female pins.
     

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