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Problem with a Maximus VII Formula

Discussion in 'Asus UK' started by BaronVonDuncs, 5 Mar 2015.

  1. BaronVonDuncs

    BaronVonDuncs New Member

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    So I got a Maximus VII Formula on 20th Feb 2015 and having inspected it for damage, as is my habit with new stuff, I found none and went ahead and installed the CPU etc. On boot up I got a message that a new CPU had been installed and push F1 to go to settings. I did this and set the defaults. Booted up again got the same message. Adjusted the settings booted up again same message appears and so on. No matter what I tried the message about a new CPU installation just kept repeating. I used my laptop to have a google search and found some stuff on the Asus boards about other people having the same problem. The conclusion of most of them was that it was a fault in the socket and the board needed to be returned to the retailer. I decided to do this and sent it back. The retailer in question has now refused my return claim on the basis that the CPU socket is damaged. Here is a picture they sent me of the damage:

    [​IMG]


    I would utterly refute that I could possibly have caused this damage during the normal course of installation. I was as careful as I always am and having been successfully fitting CPU's for around 20 years with a record of never having damaged one it seems unlikely that somehow this time I did. The nature of the damage seems to me to also support that contention in that it is one single pin bent completely over and folded back into its housing. How exactly could that be done by me when installing a CPU without doing any damage to any other pin in the surrounding area? How exactly does one go about bending a single pin back on itself in that fashion whilst fitting a CPU and heat-sink?

    Anyway before I get into a lengthy argument detailing the ongoing row I am having with the retailer about the Sales of Goods Act 1979 and the Consumer Contracts (Information, Cancellation and Additional Charges) Regulations 2013 I have a couple of questions for the Asus representatives.

    1. Do you contend that each and every motherboard that leaves your factory is free of any and all minor defects such as the one illustrated in the above picture? or is it possible that a single CPU socket pin could be bent at some time during manufacture and not spotted by Quality control? Is it realistic to claim that your production processes are so perfect in their operation that no physical damage is ever present in a shipped motherboard? Does this approach apply to all your products? Is it correct then to assume that every Asus product will always ship from the factory in an absolutely perfect physical condition?

    2. If you accept that on very rare occasions it is possible for a product to be damaged during manufacture why do you appear to operate a policy of not accepting under warranty any returns of motherboards that are in any way, no matter how slight, damaged? Does this policy apply to all Asus products or only motherboards? Or am I wrong here and in fact you make an assessment of the likely cause of the damage on a case by case basis and where consumer misuse/ accidental damage is likely then the warranty is not honoured but where the possibility exists that the damage was a manufacturing defect then the warranty is honoured? Is this distinction your policy? is it communicated to the retailers who seem to be under the impression that no damage however slight will be accepted by Asus and the warranty is always voided by the presence of physical damage?


    Just to be clear here I am not trying to be difficult or criticise Asus. I am simply really interested in the way in which the market for motherboards and particularly the issue of returns is being dealt with by retailers in the UK. A lot of the pressure for the policies (which I believe to be deeply questionable under the Sales of Goods Act 1979 and quite possibly illegal) they appear to have adopted seems to come from the approach and policy of Asus. I am therefore genuinely interested in an explanation of this policy approach and a better understanding of how its applied.

    I have been a long time user of Asus products and have had mostly Asus motherboards in my systems over the years. I have never had a problem one until now. I have also had many other Asus products and right now my system has another Maximus VII Formula, a Xonar Essence STX sound-card, 2X SLI GTX980 Matrix Platinum GPU's and an RT-AC68U router. So its not as if I shy away from Asus products. My experience of them over the years has always been very good and on the whole I have found that the quality is excellent.

    I look forward to responses to my queries from the Asus reps on these boards.
     
  2. Jim - ASUS

    Jim - ASUS New Member

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    Hi BVD, I'm sorry about the issues you've been having - these cases can get quite complex at times.

    Could you please send me a PM with the name of the retailer and any useful information pertaining to your order and return (i.e. order numbers, RMA numbers, etc) so that we can follow it up directly? Hopefully we can get this resolved as quickly as possible for you and get your motherboard back in action.
     
  3. BaronVonDuncs

    BaronVonDuncs New Member

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    An update.

    I got a phone call from the retailers representative today. There was some concern about the accuracy of my previous posts but I think after a lengthy discussion about it all we came to a mutually acceptable conclusion and they have undertaken to refund the value of the motherboard. In the light of a degree of uncertainty around the issues we agreed not to pursue the issue of the return postage.

    I would say I did appreciate that the retailer took the time to call me in person and whilst clearly we still have a few issues of difference between us broadly an amicable solution has been found. So whilst its not been an ideal purchasing experience for me it is fair to say that the retailer has made some effort to deal with my concerns and that is to be commended.
     
  4. Jim - ASUS

    Jim - ASUS New Member

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    Thanks for the update, BVD - I'm glad you've got everything sorted.
     
  5. TheMadDutchDude

    TheMadDutchDude The Flying Dutchman

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    These "rules" about the customer always being wrong are terrible. Someone had a Rampage V Extreme turn up with mashed pins and they refused to deal with it as it was his fault ... apparently. It finally got sorted with the help of some of the more powerful contacts that we have in the industry but it's a joke. They don't always leave the factory perfect!!

    There are plenty of legit builders who know what they are doing, but we get screwed when it isn't our fault.

    I'm glad something got sorted for you, albeit a little unsatisfactory.
     
  6. Mr_Mistoffelees

    Mr_Mistoffelees The Cat Lies Down on Broadway

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    This is why I now generally just default to Amazon when buying computer stuff online. Last year I ordered an Asus Xonar Essence, which turned out to have a fault and Amazon just took it back, without any quibble and sent a replacement. Not only that, they sent the replacement on next day delivery, even though I had not originally paid for that, at my request and with no extra charge.

    Old thread: http://forums.bit-tech.net/showthread.php?t=279299
     

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