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Case Mod - In Progress Project QUAD - a Quick and Dirty PC/Spindle cooling with CNC Router attachment

Discussion in 'Project Logs' started by dan297, 7 May 2021.

  1. dan297

    dan297 Modder

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    Finished the mounting plate for the spindle today. A solid piece out of 25mm thick aluminum. :eeek:

    10mm chamfer on the bottom to get some more clearance to the tool rack, later on...

    20210524_095403.jpg

    Plenty of holes and threads...

    20210524_185804.jpg

    And some machining on the back side for ball screw nut mount, ball screw and BK12 mounting block clearance...

    20210524_185818.jpg
     
    Last edited: 24 May 2021
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  2. dan297

    dan297 Modder

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    A lot of beef for a small router...:grin:

    The pocket on top is clearance for the spindle, which has a 102mm dia on the top.

    20210524_185955.jpg
     
  3. dan297

    dan297 Modder

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    It is hard to tell what is not from China these days...
    Our company has several plants there too, and the parts are not better or worse than our stuff from India, Poland, US or Japan...

    Key is how much effort you put into QA. If the stuff is made in China, but under a tight outside control, you are good.

    If your purchase is from a genuine Chinese copy cat, however, you play the lottery.
    Some are actually quite good, some are just plain crap.
    10 years from now they all will be good and we are doomed :rollingeyes:

    I have some ISO20 tool holders and collets coming in from Ali, at a fraction of the local cost here in Germany. 10% actually :eeek:.
    It is my first purchase there. I am usually a supporter of local equipment and dealers, but this one I couldn't resist.

    And I am practically sure, the ones I buy here are from the same Chinese shop floor...

    A run-out check will tell..
     
  4. dan297

    dan297 Modder

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    Made some progress this weekend.
    Cheapskate suggested some time ago in the ATAACS thread that I do something with the 4th axis. Well your whish is my command...

    I completely forgot to order some stock for the small parts like BS nut holder and stopper block.
    Usually for this kind of stuff I just go to my local metal dealer and browse through their "waste bin".
    They have an ample stash of left over material from cutting jobs, which is still sorted by grade, so you know exactly what you get. And you get it for scrap metal prices :thumb:
    Unfortunately, due to the still ongoing pandemic, you can not go their anymore. Only online orders and shipping possible :wallbash:

    Since I had not have the square stock at hand for those parts, I decided to make them from round stock.
    From a pre-pandemic shopping tour I still have this 65mm bar at hand...

    20210527_141241.jpg


    Cut off a piece and put it to the lathe.

    20210527_141839.jpg


    That is the basis for the milling ops.

    20210527_143932.jpg
     
    Last edited: 30 May 2021
  5. dan297

    dan297 Modder

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    First off, finding zero of the 4th axis. Rather than starting an indicating orgy, I usually clamp it around a bar in the collet.
    That works fine for me...

    20210527_145339.jpg


    Next, milling the outer shape.

    20210527_152307.jpg


    And some tapping...

    20210527_170605.jpg


    Back to the metal band saw.
    I am wasting 50% of the material this way, but I am sure I find some use of the scrap part. I always keep this stuff...

    20210527_172508.jpg


    Decking the saw cut.

    20210527_174107.jpg


    And here is the finished ball screw nut holder...

    20210527_190940.jpg
     
    Last edited: 30 May 2021
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  6. dan297

    dan297 Modder

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    OK, I do admit, this was no "real" use of the 4th axis. I just used it to clamp the work piece :grin:

    Same ops for the stopper block.

    20210528_123330.jpg


    The long endmill and a 32mm deep cut is kinda borderline for this toy.
    The outer dimension 50mm x 50mm is fine within a 0.04mm tolerance, but the surface quality is sh§t...

    But the dimension of this part actually does not really matter, so after I cut off the block I gave each side a treatment with the face mill to make it smooth...
    (forgot to take pictures though :wallbash:)

    20210528_124359.jpg
     
    Last edited: 30 May 2021
  7. dan297

    dan297 Modder

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    Next I made two little helpers for assembly.

    After a painstaking process, taking off thou after thou, with inbetween measurement and re-measurement, I managed to mill both parts together to exactly 98.00 mm length.

    20210528_175038.jpg


    They ensure that both rails are absolutely parallel to each other.

    20210528_181641.jpg

    The bottom rail is pushed against four dowel pins (already removed in the pic) and bolted down.
    This makes it parallel to the left side of the base plate.
    The make shift parallels go inbetween the two rails and the second one is bolted down too - with correct spacing and parallelism.
     
    Last edited: 30 May 2021
  8. dan297

    dan297 Modder

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    Then I could add the carriers and ball screw.
    The stopper block has a hole with the exact dia of the BS.
    During assembly this helps to adjust the parallelism of the BS.

    Once the BS nut holder is fixed to the sliding plate, the stopper block is removed, the hole widened, and then put back in place.
    There is no bearing at the "loose" end of the BS. At this short distance no need. But the stopper block prevents the nut from running off the BS (and the carriers from the rails)...in case of operator brain lock :eeek::grin:

    20210529_142222.jpg

    The sliding plate is pushed with to dowel pins against the left side carriers and then bolted to the carriers. This should make it parallel to the rails.

    Fixing the nut holder is a bit more tricky.
    First a loose assy of the 6 bolts from the nut itself, just to have them already in place.
    Then a loose fit to the sliding plate. Just so it has contact, but can still move.
    Then tightening the 6 bolts of the nut.

    20210530_164700.jpg

    Since this has to happen with the nut all the way to the loose end, there are 4 holes in the sliding plate to access the bolts of the fixed end bearing block.
    Once the nut holder is fixed to the nut, the plate is moved to the upper position and with the nut close to the bearing block both are tightend as well.
     
    Last edited: 30 May 2021
  9. dan297

    dan297 Modder

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    In order to tighten the 6 bolts of the BS nut to the holder I had to reach down approx 70mm between the base plate and the sliding plate.
    So I needed some extra long bits. On top of it, the two closest to the base plate can be reached only at an angle, so I needed ball tips as well.

    Rather than spending 15 EUR on one 152mm long Wera bit (which btw was not available anyway) I thought I make a hell of a deal at Amazon and buy 11 100mm Chinese bits for 20 EUR...

    20210530_230041.jpg


    The regular allen key bits are ok (so far). But the ones with the round tip are just plain crap.

    20210530_230107.jpg

    Died on me at 10 Nm at the second bolt :eeek:

    In case you ever need something with a round tip...avoid cheap...
     
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  10. dan297

    dan297 Modder

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    On a side note, the spindle came back on Friday.
    I sent it off to the manufacturer for rework on Tuesday. That is pretty fast service.

    The holes look much better now, so my confidence for a balanced speed of 30,000 rpm is restored :thumb:

    20210530_170411.jpg
     
  11. kim

    kim hardware addict

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    This tooling and milling porn is impressive:jawdrop: :grin:, :rollingeyes: I'm wondering... are you actually using all those tools for your work or is it just a hobby ?...
     
  12. dan297

    dan297 Modder

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    Hobby usage only. :lol:
    I accumulated this over the past 25 years, starting with a dremel, drill press and some hand tools and graduated over the years... :dremel:

    I converted the mill to CNC some 15 years ago, as a project of its own.
    Changed also the Chinese DC motor and control to a propper AC motor plus VFD.
    Same motor change at the lathe. I just do not trust the "electronics" on these cheap Chinese machines...:worried:

    The machines themselves are actually kinda affordable, if you save up a little bit over time.
    What makes it f$3king expensive are all the tools and accessories...

    But then, there is Xmas, birthdays, etc... :naughty:
    So after a quater century shop floor space becomes more of an issue.


    I am coming basically from RC modeling. Scratch building of planes, helicopters, off-road cars, etc...
    But at 50+ years my interest lately shifted more towards woodworking. Just do not have the patience anymore to work 2 years on a plane, only to smash it into the ground at maiden flight :eeek:

    And of course the occasional PC :grin:


    With the router, however, I am considering to start a little side hustle, for re-financing at least some of the cost...
    Like custom parts for modding (reservoirs, distro plates, whatever...)
    Some stuff made out of wood, to be sold on Etsy, and so on...

    Not sure yet about that...:oldconfused:
     
    Last edited: 31 May 2021
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  13. kim

    kim hardware addict

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    :grin: I had the feeling that it was just you're personal workshop; and I'm not surprised to read that you've been practising during decades :naughty:, RC modeling is close to modding anyway...good luck for your forcoming projects, nice to have you here too :grin:
     
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  14. dan297

    dan297 Modder

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    Thank you ! :thumb:

    The work space is not so personal anymore, however...
    2.5 years ago my wife "invaded" the shop with a paper hobby and since then I am on the retreat :eeek:

    But happy wife, happy life.
    And no more complaints about me spending time in the basement :nono:

    Also, she sells her stuff like greeting cards, wrappings, little packagings, gifts, etc...
    Nothing to life from, but is pays material and tools (yes, you read correctly...tools :eeek:)
    So she is already well ahead of me, because my hobby consumes money while hers is already self sustained...
     
    Last edited: 31 May 2021
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  15. Cheapskate

    Cheapskate Insane? or just stupid?

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    Looking great.
    Chinese tools break?!?! I thought they just bent like the metric drill bits I picked up. :lol:
    4th axis...for clamping. You didn't think you could trick me, right? :p
    The mental image of your wife trying to gift wrap a milling vise. :lol: -Or the youngest being tasked with getting the gifts out from under the tree.
     
  16. dan297

    dan297 Modder

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    I made some more progress during the weekend.
    A 12mm thick holder for the servo and a 10mm thick top plate.

    In order to save some milling time I pre-cut the T-shape of the servo holder on the bandsaw.
    The saw is rated only for 125mm high stock, so the 165mm high plate had to be rotated so the cuts can meet in the middle.
    This steep angle is not ideal from a safety point of view and only very light pressure could be applied...

    20210531_074358.jpg


    Milling this was rather straightforward.

    20210531_084620.jpg


    The servo can shift 11mm. This should be enough to get the belt over the pulleys.

    20210531_100620.jpg
     
  17. dan297

    dan297 Modder

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    The top plate was more work, because I could not do the shape in one go, because of my limited Y-travel.

    20210529_095456.jpg


    Some 15mm were missing, so I used an angle grinder to finish the cut...

    20210529_110123.jpg


    Then I rotated the part 90deg, using the BS screw axis as rotating point, which is also my work piece zero.
    This way I did not have to indicate again after re-clamping.

    20210529_110931.jpg


    After this Y became X and the remaining outer contour could be milled without the limit...

    20210529_115505.jpg


    The plate goes on top of the Z-axis and holds a brake, which is closed when no power is applied and open when the milling software has enabled status.
    The BS has not a lot of self-locking force and the brake should avoid that the heavy spindle goes down by gravity when the mill is turned off. Or, more importantly, when the emergency stop button pushed...

    I still have to make an adapter for the brake, which connects it with the BS pulley.
    That is what the pocket is for...to give the adapter some space.

    20210531_221156.jpg


    The T-shape is required, because on the long shank of the T the drag chain is fitted

    20210531_221128.jpg
     
  18. dan297

    dan297 Modder

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    Because I want to use a rack type tool magazin with minimum spacing, to place as many tools as possible on the mill, the spindle needs to stick out a certain distance under the mounting plate.
    Otherwise the plate would hit the neighbouring tool holders in the rack during a tool change...
    But the spindle has a wider dia at the top. So I had to increase the inner dia of the top spindle mount.

    I made a little comb from 3mm scrap acetal for the clamping gap and tightend the screws.

    20210530_165445.jpg


    Then I could safely put the mount in the vise and mill a 10 mm deep increased diameter.
    The part is extruded and anodized, so the alloy has a lot of silicone and certainly no lead.
    Means not ideal for milling and prone to smear and to clog the endmill. To avoid this I took only 1mm depth of cut with a lot of cutting oil (no mist cooling on that mill...)

    20210530_170742.jpg


    The top clamp bolt is now right at the edge of the cut, so it should still be ok.

    20210531_072233.jpg
     
  19. dan297

    dan297 Modder

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    Then I made a tiny block from steel, which triggers the inductive reference switch.
    For this, I left the bottom edge sharp, which should give me hopefully a repeatable position.

    20210530_184222.jpg
     
  20. dan297

    dan297 Modder

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    And finally, while I made all these parts I printed a cover for the pulley.

    20210531_072245.jpg
     
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