Scratch Build – Complete Reductio - scratch build to sell off some stuff...

Discussion in 'Project Logs' started by Journeyer, 30 Aug 2017.

  1. Journeyer

    Journeyer Well-Known Member

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    So, not too long ago I got myself a Ryzen system. This freed up a number of components - enough to put together another decent enough gaming system. Now, according to the wife I have enough computers running in the house now, and that there was a practical limit to how many I am able to use simultaneously at any given time (clearly she doesn't know me quite as well as she thinks). So she presented the argument that I should sell the stuff left over from my recent build.



    So I thought about what this system would be good for. It's not the most powerful on the planet, so I decided it should be a simple and easy to move system that would be perfect for lugging along to a friends LAN-night or something like that.

    Then I made a quick design in Sketchup, and went to work.

    The components going into this system would be:

    Asus Sabertooth 990fx
    AMD FX8150
    16GB DDR3 Corsair Vengeance 1866Mhz RAM
    Asus ROG GTX780 Poseidon
    Creative SoundBlaster X-fi
    2x OCZ 120GB SSD (configured in RAID-0)
    Corsair CX600 V2

    And that's it. That's really all you need.

    First I found a flat piece of pinewood and cut it to the shape I wanted. Then I chamfered the edges and routed out a section to make a handle.

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    Simple enough, right? This will be the support for all the components.
    Next, I needed some feet. I decided to make these out of teak, and I just happened to have plenty left over from my PS3 project a few years ago. So I set about shaping these as well, which is rather easily done when working with teak.

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    Then I set about fitting the feet to the main panel. I cut two sections from the bottom of the panel, and then I slipped the feet on. It's a tight fit, and now it stands!

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    And from the back:

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    That looked good to me, so I fastened them with two brass wood screws.

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    So now I needed to start laying out the mounting positions for all the components - starting with my trusty old DFI standin motherboard. I also made a set of round teak motherboard standoffs by roughly cutting them out, drilling a hole, sticking a screw through them all and tightening them down with a nut. Then I stuck the screw into my drill-press and used a wood rasp, files and sandpaper to get them rounded.

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    So now I had the mounting position for the motherboard. Next I routed out some holes to guide cables through.

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    And then set about mounting the PSU. This would be mounted on the back, and the lack of a mounting bracket led me to take it apart, drill four holes in the bottom of it and simply screw it down with brass wood screws. I also cut the wires I wouldn't need.

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    And with the covers back on (here I have also drilled the mounting holes for the SSDs):

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    Now the thing was pretty much finished, but I needed to stain the wood. I stumbled upon some lovely stain by chance one day, and I used this stuff to stain the pine after sanding all the wood smooth.

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    Last edited: 30 Aug 2017
  2. Journeyer

    Journeyer Well-Known Member

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    So now the pine panel had been stained, and I started putting pieces back on. I had cut all the wires I wouldn't need from the PSU, and remounted it.

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    Next I made a small bracket to hold the power switch, as well as an expansion card bracket - both were made from teak.

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    As always, I used brass screws to secure the last of the teak bits.

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    Then I drilled some holes for a couple of status LEDs and the power switch and tested the fit.

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    Starting to come together now, but still with the old standin DFI board.

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    Nothing more to be done in the workshed, so I took the DFI board off and brought the thing inside. It was time to start mounting the proper hardware, and to start sleeving all the wires - starting with the ATX-bundle.

    Several hours later, with National Geographic and Discovery science as background noise, I had finished sleeving the ATX wires.

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    Now came the time to tidy it up a bit by stiching them together, and I opted to use brass thread for this.

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    Damnit, forgot to rotate the pics. Hang on...
     
    Last edited: 30 Aug 2017
  3. Journeyer

    Journeyer Well-Known Member

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    Continuing the process I also sleeved the rest of the wires.

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    And once that was done I installed the rest of the hardware, and then the build was finished.

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  4. Journeyer

    Journeyer Well-Known Member

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    So there you have it; a quick and easy project that I chose to name "Reductio". Next was just a manner of putting an OS on it and make it ready to sell. Here's to hoping someone takes it...

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  5. storm-83

    storm-83 Member

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    looks good!
    - and eerily similar to something i have been wanting to do for a while now - nice to see the idea i viable! :)

    from the looks of things, i would be surprised if you have a hard time selling it.
    it's unique which is often a great selling point...
     
  6. Journeyer

    Journeyer Well-Known Member

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    Thank you.
    Yes I do hope it sells, at least in order to secure peace around the house...
     
  7. yuusou

    yuusou Well-Known Member

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    Looking super good! I'm sure it'll sell fairly easily.
    As a side note: I expect that DFI to be properly cleaned and turned into a clock by the end of the week.
     
  8. Journeyer

    Journeyer Well-Known Member

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    Thank you.

    But ... what would I then use to catch all the sawdust I'm producing?
     
  9. yuusou

    yuusou Well-Known Member

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    Why... a Asus Sabertooth 990fx of course!
     
  10. Journeyer

    Journeyer Well-Known Member

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    It's ... it's so obvious! Why didn't I see it?
     

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