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RivaTuner Linux equivalent?

Discussion in 'bit-tech Folding Team' started by DocJonz, 9 Oct 2009.

  1. DocJonz

    DocJonz Another CPC refugee .....

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    @Linux Guru's: Is there a RivaTuner equivalent for Linux (I'm using Ubuntu64), or some app that can be used to adjust the speed of the GPU fan?? - things are getting a bit toasty ...!
     
  2. JackOfAll

    JackOfAll New Member

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    Not sure where you'd get the Ubuntu package from, but what you're looking for is called nvclock. 'nvclock -F ....'

    Code:
           
           -F, --fanspeed speed
                  Using this option you can adjust the duty  cycle  of  the
                  fanspeed. The value you can enter can be a delta like +10
                  or -10 which increases/decreases the fanspeed  with  10%.
                  Further the value can be a number like 20 which would set
                  the fanspeed to 20%.  Further  if  your  sensor  supports
                  automatic  (temperature  controlled) fanspeed adjustments
                  you can also use the value ’auto’ to switch back to auto-
                  matic  control.  Note  that  in  all  cases  the  (final)
                  fanspeed should lie between 10%  and  100%.  A  low  duty
                  cycle correspons to a low fanspeed.
    
                  Note  that  the  duty cycle is NOT the fanspeed. The duty
                  cycle controls the percentage of time  in  a  fixed  time
                  interval  in  which the fan is ’on’. By choosing a higher
                  value the fan is enabled a larger part of the time  which
                  results  in  a  higher  fanspeed. Changing the duty cycle
                  from 20% to 40% doesn’t double the noise or fanspeed.
    
    I also understand (but this is secondhand rather than from personal experience) that the latest nVidia BETA drivers 190.xx allow fan control from the nvidia control panel. But obviously not a lot of use for folding purposes where you're stuck on the 180.xx series.
     
  3. DocJonz

    DocJonz Another CPC refugee .....

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    Thanks JackOfAll.
    Installed nvclock, then had to do a bit of fiddling in the xorg.conf file to enable Coolbits, then on rebooting, I've got control of the duty cycle which I've bumped up - temps dropped nicely :)
    Lets see if this particular GPU now behaves nicely .... :worried:
     
  4. DocJonz

    DocJonz Another CPC refugee .....

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    Couldn't get the old GPU to sustain running 24/7, so popped in a GTX 260 :D

    Q. If you have two GPU's, how do you target a specific one with 'nvclock'?
     
  5. JackOfAll

    JackOfAll New Member

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    Code:
            -c, --card number
                  Most systems only contain only one videocard. On  systems
                  with  multiple  cards,  this option can be used to select
                  the card to overclock.
    
     
  6. DocJonz

    DocJonz Another CPC refugee .....

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    Oops - missed that one on the help list :blush:
    One final question - there's option to clock the GPU and Mem - what about the shader?
     
  7. JackOfAll

    JackOfAll New Member

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    There's no way to get at the shader clock, on the fly, at runtime. It's a case of using a VGA bios editor if you want to do that. Dump the bios, edit the shader clock, and flash it back.
     

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