News Rumours point to problems with Intel's 10nm node

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Gareth Halfacree, 25 Jun 2015.

  1. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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  2. Corky42

    Corky42 What did walle eat for breakfast?

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    Question if I may: From what I've read via my Google-fu quantum tunnelling starts to occur around 3nm, the accepted way of describing CPUs are 14nm, 10nm, etc, etc, that (afaik) is only the transistor size, or is it the gap?

    Anyway even though a CPU is described as 10nm are there actually smaller components inside the CPU, smaller enough to experience quantum tunnelling?
     
  3. Hustler

    Hustler Member

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    Hmm, these 'Kaby Lake' have a 'Broadwell' like smell about them.
     
  4. Alexg

    Alexg New Member

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    In reply to Corky42 - Yes there are smaller parts, 14nm is the transistor size. The tunneling is a particular issue for the oxide layers used to provide insulation on the gate of the transistor. One of the reasons silicon is good chips is it has a solid stable oxide however these layers are now so thin that electrons can tunnel across them and leak out of the chip, essentially resulting in it going from charged to uncharged or 0 - 1 over time. The silicon-dioxide is being replaced by alternative materials to help mitigate this but it becomes more and more of an issue and harder to fix as the chip gets smaller.
     
    Corky42 and andrew8200m like this.
  5. wolfticket

    wolfticket Downwind from the bloodhounds

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    Fraudwell™
     
  6. silk186

    silk186 Canadian

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    don't we hear the same thing with every node?
     
  7. play_boy_2000

    play_boy_2000 It was funny when I was 12

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    I just wish tsmc or glofo could figure out something sub-20nm, to move the rest of the semicon industry along.
     
  8. jrs77

    jrs77 theorycrafting

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    If we look at the problems they allready have with the current 14nm process pushing out decent yields, than it's no surprise really that the yet smaller process has it's problems.
     
  9. amagriva

    amagriva Member

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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hustler
    Hmm, these 'Kaby Lake' have a 'Broadwell' like smell about them.
    Fraudwell™

    Zap!well anyone?
     
  10. rollo

    rollo Well-Known Member

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    Id imagine Intel are fast approaching the point where Cost to make will outwiegh the benefits if we are not already at that point.

    If it costs them several $bil to develop and sort 10nm they have to make back at least twice that for it to be worthwhile.

    Skylake is a nice chip and has good stock improvements over Sandybridge but are they enough for people to spend the cash upgrading. Id personally just overclock it a bit and get similar bang for buck.
     

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