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News Scientists improve blue OLEDs

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by CardJoe, 25 Nov 2008.

  1. CardJoe

    CardJoe Freelance Journalist

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  2. p3n

    p3n New Member

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    If someone can make an LED bright enough to power a projector that'd be neat (no cost, replacement, heat, noise) until then gogo gadget LCD tv :p
     
  3. steveo_mcg

    steveo_mcg New Member

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    Did any one else think bugger more blue leds in things.
     
  4. mclean007

    mclean007 Officious Bystander

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    The longer it takes to bring OLED to market, the more improvements to LCD and plasma there will be to erode the benefits of the technology. You can now get LCD TVs with local dimming LED backlights - presumably derived from the "Brightside" technology featured in a bit-tech article back in 2005 - http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/2005/10/03/brightside_hdr_edr/1 - which effectively solve the contrast ratio issue with LCD while at the same time offering a wider colour gamut. Picture processing has evolved to such a level that smearing / motion blur is all but eradicated on high end LCDs now, and that will inevitably filter down to the lower end soon enough. From the plasma side, you've got Pioneer completely redefining the concept of black levels with its KURO range. Image burn is much less of an issue than it was with early plasmas.

    So where does that leave us? OLED's contrast ratio is unlikely to be better than will be achieved on even mid-range LCD and plasma screens by the time OLED hits in volume, and it's response time is unlikely to make a difference now that smearing / motion blur is effectively solved. It has the potential to be lighter, slimmer and lower power (none of which is likely to be a deal breaker in the mass market, though all other things being equal it could be persuasive, and there will of course be a market which will pay a premium for a super-slim TV). OLED has better viewing angles than even the best LCDs, though plasma doesn't tend to suffer in that department. And that's about it.

    Ultimately it will come down to price. OLED will inevitably debut in high-end TVs and filter down. If it can compete price-wise with LCD and plasma TVs of similar quality, then it may take over the world. Right now I'm sceptical. Ask me again in 2015!
     
  5. UrbanMarine

    UrbanMarine Government Prostitute

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    I liked some of the ideas devs have for OLED display layouts in commercial use. Being able to wrap a screen around a pillar or oddly shaped object is quite fascinating. A light flexible display would be awesome.

    I'll be using my plasma for awhile because I use TVs until they blow up. I've only changed my PC monitors once (CRT->LCD). Next purchase when they get cheaper will be a 27+inch PC monitor.
     
  6. Mongoose132

    Mongoose132 Duckmad

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    Damn.

    Just bought a new 37" LCD >.<
     
  7. salesman

    salesman New Member

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    mclean007, there is only so far that they can push a technology, and right now LCD and plasma are at its threshold. I do believe you are correct though by the time oled tvs come out the improvements it has will not make it much better then existing technology has to offer right now. However there is a great deal more in this then we know. I think it will be a long time as well.
     
  8. metarinka

    metarinka New Member

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    Contrast ratio, overall colour gaumt, energy efficiency and viewing angle. Some of the problems whilst they can improve them are inherent to LCD/Plasma technology and will never be overcome. Whilst they are getting better, they will never be trully overcome. I think Oled will hit big in the portable electronics market, video players, cell phones etc where it's benefits really shine through (less energy consumed, thinner).

    To my understanding OLED has the chance to have extremely high contrast because when a pixel turns off that's it, there's no backlight
     
  9. Nexxo

    Nexxo Queue Jumper

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    Already done. The Samsung MBP-100, 3M Mpro110 and Optoma Pico Projector portable projectors are backlit by a white LED. All cost around £250,-- to 300,--.

    As for OLED displays: their strength will be in low-power portable applications. If they get cheap enough to make on a large scale, they will make the leap to big sets. Power consumption will become an issue in the future...
     
    Last edited: 25 Nov 2008
  10. UrbanMarine

    UrbanMarine Government Prostitute

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  11. rhuitron

    rhuitron Bump? What Bump?

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    I Cant wait!!!
     
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