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Networks Technical Equipment Required for 50-100 gaming LAN?

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by SparkuS, 4 May 2006.

  1. SparkuS

    SparkuS What's a Dremel?

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    Hi, I have some novice experience with networking i.e. I have set up many small (1-5 computer) LANs using small switches, routers etc. to do the basics such as internet sharing. I have also set up 15-20 person gaming LANs simply using a 20-port switch. I am curious as to the equipment and basically everything required to setup and manage 50-100 people gaming for a weekend in one hall.

    Is this as simple as buying a 48 port switch and plugging all the computers in? I'd imagine not. What then happens when you have in excess of 48 computers? What's the best way to 'bridge' two switches?
     
  2. hitman012

    hitman012 Minimodder

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    Most switches will have an uplink port that allows you to connect another switch to them for expanded capacity.
     
  3. SparkuS

    SparkuS What's a Dremel?

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    Ok excellent. So I've got 40 gaming clients' computers into one 10/100 48-port switch and 40 in another 10/100 48-port switch with the switches bridged using the upload port. This will allow all the computers to communicate with each other and game smoothly, yes? Will I need to have a DCHP server attached? If so, what benefit will this provide? The organisation I am with has copies of Windows 2003 Server that I can use for this purpose, if necessary.

    Next, I'd want to have a fileserver, intranet and IRC server setup. Would it be a reasonable expectation to run all of these servers on a single box? What kind of system requirements would I be looking at?
     
  4. FIBRE+

    FIBRE+ Minimodder

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    Yer it's pretty simple :)

    Im not an expert but heres what I would do...

    Gigabit ethernet main switch feeding all servers and switches, 2x 48 port 10/100 switches with 2x gigabit ethernet uplinks per switch

    Netgear 16-port Gigabit Ethernet Switch : £126.93 ex vat

    Netgear ProSafe 48-port 10/100 Smart Switch + 2 Gigabit Ports : £216.62 ex vat

    Both include rack mounting kits by the looks of it.

    Ethernet will do the job nicely but if you need to cover any long distances it would be worth looking at fibre.

    Shouldnt need much server wise, just something stable and reliable, two mid end machines with couple o' gigs of ram and couple of gigabit ethernet cards. One for file server one for the IRC/intranet server, might be worth mirroring whats on both the servers so if one dies you still have another up. Theres plenty of servers on Ebay.

    Hope this helps :thumb:
     
    Last edited: 4 May 2006
  5. mickey123

    mickey123 What's a Dremel?

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    Hello Fiber,

    Could you recommend a good switch that will do 24 gamers? I hear great things about HP switches?

    Would I need a server to put on a 24 person LAN party?

    Taking it I wouldn't need a main switch, just the one would do??

    :confused:

    Cheers

    Mickey :thumb:
     
  6. Mary Jo

    Mary Jo oh lolz

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  7. mickey123

    mickey123 What's a Dremel?

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    Thanks again Mary Jo

    I read an article on toms networking re what switch and it says you need a total bandwidth of 48 Gbps! Is this right??

    Cut and paste bellow

    TIP: While you're switch shopping, make sure any purchase candidates have enough bandwidth to handle full speed on all ports simultaneously. This is usually referred to as "non-blocking" in specifications, but it's a good idea to also check the switch's bandwidth or switching capacity spec to make sure the numbers add up. (The info you need is sometimes listed under "switch fabric", too.)

    For a 24-port 10/100 Mbps switch at full duplex (100 Mbps both directions) the switch bandwidth specification should be at least 4.8 Gbps - 100 Mbps per port x 2 (transmit and receive) x 24 ports. Note that each 10/100 port adds 200 Mbps and each gigabit port adds 2 Gbps to the switch's bandwidth requirement. Make sure you add in bandwidth for dedicated uplink ports, which count just like normal ports.

    If you can't find the spec for 10/100 standalone switches, don't sweat it, since it's unlikely you'll find any current-design products that aren't non-blocking. But make sure you check the spec for any gigabit gear you're considering. There are switches out there that say they're "non-blocking", but whose bandwidth numbers don't support the claim. For example, a 24 port gigabit switch should have 48 Gbps of bandwidth. Anything less, and you're not getting "non-blocking" performance.

    Full article here http://www.tomsnetworking.com/2005/07/19/lan_party_how_to_/page2.html
     
  8. mickey123

    mickey123 What's a Dremel?

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    Anyone??
     
  9. CaseyBlackburn

    CaseyBlackburn Network Techie

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    No, it says 4.8 Gbps. It says 48 Gbps for a Gigabit 24 port switch, that is not what is mentioned, what is mentioned for you is a 24 10/100 switch with 2 gigabit uplinks.
     
  10. mickey123

    mickey123 What's a Dremel?

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  11. CaseyBlackburn

    CaseyBlackburn Network Techie

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    The other one will work just as fine, most of the clients will only have 10/100 networking not 10/100/1000 networking so it would just be a waste for that switch. And the previous one you can link together with two cables for expansion, you can do it with any switch.
     
  12. mickey123

    mickey123 What's a Dremel?

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    OK casey, thanks.

    Im just having a hard time understanding they are so cheap!!!

    I may just go for the 48 port one mentioned originally by Fiber.

    Just to clarify the 48 port one would be way fast enough to play 48 peeps head to head on a LAN all palying BF2 maxed out?? Just to be safe Im asking again :eyebrow:

    Mickey the pest
     
  13. CaseyBlackburn

    CaseyBlackburn Network Techie

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    Yes it will work just fine. The switch has 13.6 Gbs of bandwidth which is just the amount you would need. You could even do less because I bet BF2 uses no where near to all of the 100 Mbps.
     
  14. MrWillyWonka

    MrWillyWonka Chocolate computers galore!

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    5mbit up up 5mbit down for 64 players. So you are well within a limits of bandwidth. But I'd still reccomend gigabit since you'll be having background file transfers and since most people will probably be running on 100mbps, gigabit will be giving you a leeway and extra bandwidth to prevent network slowdown.
     
  15. mickey123

    mickey123 What's a Dremel?

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    Hey there mr wonka

    sorry to be thick but which one is the gigabit again? :duh:

    Id def rather have twice the bandwidth I need than 5% to little.



    EDIT - Oh yeah - Im with ya mr wonka - you mean the one I recomended?

    What componets would I need for the server?



    Have you seen this for a switch - any good ??

    http://configure.euro.dell.com/dell...&kc=305&l=en&oc=PC052324&s=bsd&sbc=pwcnt_2324
     
    Last edited: 7 May 2006
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