1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Linux Ubuntu Install Failed

Discussion in 'Software' started by TeenGeek, 19 Nov 2014.

  1. TeenGeek

    TeenGeek Worst touch typing ever.

    Joined:
    11 Feb 2011
    Posts:
    122
    Likes Received:
    1
    Hey all, I recently tried to install Ubuntu 14.04 LTS onto my Aorus X7. In the middle of the install, it crashed. I just told it to erase all old data, and go ahead with a new install. After it failed, I figured that I would just try it again. (I'm using a USB drive that used pen drive installer to create the bootable disk.) Now, when I try to install it again, I get a black screen with text on it. The text is this:

    GNU GRUB version 2.02^beta2-9ubuntu1

    Minimal BASH-like line editing is supported. For the first word, TAB
    lists possible command completions. Anywhere else TAB lists possible
    device or file completions.​

    grub> _

    That last line is an entry field, and I have no idea what to put in there to fix the installer.
    Help please!!!
    Thanks,
    Kevin
     
  2. jebk

    jebk New Member

    Joined:
    18 Oct 2014
    Posts:
    46
    Likes Received:
    2
    grub is the bootloader, which is probably installed on the hard disk. Are you sure you have the boot order set correctly? On my machine UEFI HDD and standard HDD have different boot priorities. Make sure they're both behind USB, or manually select the memstick in the boot order.
     
    TeenGeek likes this.
  3. theshadow2001

    theshadow2001 [DELETE] means [DELETE]

    Joined:
    3 May 2012
    Posts:
    5,199
    Likes Received:
    155
    It's possible some of the installation got on to the usb. Format the usb fully. Ensure you have the full amount of free space of the pen available after formatting. Once you have that done go through the procedure of making the pen the live disk again. Boot into the live version of ubuntu and format the disk you are installing on using gparted . After that install ubuntu again and this time manually select the partition to install rather than using default. This might require setting up a swap root and home partition first.

    It may be more straight forward to use a DVD instead of a usb pen for installation if that's an option.

    If you go with a DVD or usb definitely reformat failed installation first
     
    Last edited: 19 Nov 2014
    TeenGeek likes this.
  4. TeenGeek

    TeenGeek Worst touch typing ever.

    Joined:
    11 Feb 2011
    Posts:
    122
    Likes Received:
    1
    I just sent the laptop into the University's IT department because I just don't have enough time to deal with it right now. I'll definitely be getting an external disk reader at this point. I had a Windows 8 install on the computer, but that got deleted because Ubuntu didn't recognize my OS install. (which is unfortunate because I had a 25 GB partition made specifically for the Ubuntu install.) Oh well, I'll try again once I get an ISO burned to disk, and an actual backup made.
    Thanks jebk and theshadow2001!
     
  5. theshadow2001

    theshadow2001 [DELETE] means [DELETE]

    Joined:
    3 May 2012
    Posts:
    5,199
    Likes Received:
    155
    Was your intention to dual boot? When you said you told ubuntu to erase all data I assumed you were clearing the full disk. Which is what selecting that option does I'm pretty sure.

    Will IT setup the ubuntu install or are they just reimaging windows 8?
     
  6. TeenGeek

    TeenGeek Worst touch typing ever.

    Joined:
    11 Feb 2011
    Posts:
    122
    Likes Received:
    1
    My university, unfortunately, does not support linux, at all (as far as I am aware, it has to do with some deal they made with cisco over access points, but I do not know what the official reason for that is). So I didn't even ask them to setup a ubuntu install. I was planning to dual boot, and I was under the impression that I would be able to select the partition on the drive that I wanted to use. Obviously, I should have done some better, more comprehensive research.

    Fortunately, I don't keep anything critical on my laptop, so I didn't lose any important data. As it stands right now, they are *probably* going to do a reimage of windows 8.

    It's 8.1 pro, but the fellow that helped me out was not particularly knowledgeable about what sorts of USB drives they had on hand. I think it should turn out fine though. By the way, do you know of any reason that Linux would have an issue installing onto an Intel RAID array?
    Thanks,
    Kevin
     
  7. theshadow2001

    theshadow2001 [DELETE] means [DELETE]

    Joined:
    3 May 2012
    Posts:
    5,199
    Likes Received:
    155
    I have little knowledge of raid arrays unfortunately.

    Some things to keep in mind when you are installing a dual boot system. Turn off fast boot in Windows 8. Use the 64 bit ubuntu iso image. Id also use the 14.04 lts image over 14.10 unless you specifically need that version. They say you dont need to turn off secure boot in in the uefi but it may be necessary. Shrink the partition in windows then use gparted to create the root swap and home partitions from the live ubuntu usb/DVD. Then install ubuntu. During installation select the partitions you created using gparted (the something else option). The partitions can be created during installation, but I find gparted easier to use. Swap is 1x to 2x your ram. I'd put maybe 8 to 10 Gb for root ( / ) and the rest for home . Root and home use the ext4 file system.

    The whole uefi thing has made dual booting a bit more difficult than previously. So I would focus your research on guides that deals with uefi.
     
    Last edited: 20 Nov 2014
  8. TeenGeek

    TeenGeek Worst touch typing ever.

    Joined:
    11 Feb 2011
    Posts:
    122
    Likes Received:
    1
    Ubuntu wouldn't recognize that I already had an OS installed. Could that be an issue of Ubuntu not being able to recognize Windows 8.1? Or could it just be that I have such an atypical setup on my computer?

    looks like the main thing that I missed would have to be the gparted partition. I created a 25 GB open partition through windows, but I didn't know how to select it in the Ubuntu installer, since the file selection system looks completely different. What is swap? and what is the difference between the root and home you mentioned? I know that root is the linux version of administrator, but i'm not sure what you mean in this case. for the record, I have 32GB of ram, if that helps any. also, in case it makes a difference, I have 2 1TB samsung 840 EVO mSATA SSDs in my laptop. I assume that ext4 is an alternative to something like fat32, etc?

    I'll be sure to check up on UEFI guides when I get my laptop back, and perhaps I'll have a go at making a guide on here for others, so that people don't run into issues similar to what I've encountered.
    thanks!
     
    Last edited: 20 Nov 2014
  9. theshadow2001

    theshadow2001 [DELETE] means [DELETE]

    Joined:
    3 May 2012
    Posts:
    5,199
    Likes Received:
    155
    I would imagine the reason it didn't pick up Windows was because quick boot was enabled (in windows 8).

    Root is like the c:\ in windows. It holds the operating system and system files. Swap is like the page file in windows. Home is like your personal directory in windows docs pics vids etc.

    Ext4 is the file system used in Linux like ntfs is in windows.

    If it can detect windows you could probably avoid all the extra partitioning. However the install along side windows option isn't fool proof. Manually setting up the partitions means that both you and ubuntu know where it is being installed to. Its fairly easy to do with gparted. Its as easy to use as any windows based partitioning software. At install time it's then simply a matter of selecting the configured partitions.
     
    Last edited: 21 Nov 2014
  10. TeenGeek

    TeenGeek Worst touch typing ever.

    Joined:
    11 Feb 2011
    Posts:
    122
    Likes Received:
    1
    Alright, awesome! Thank you very much for the help! I'll be sure to try that once I get my laptop back, and let you know how it goes!
     
  11. GuilleAcoustic

    GuilleAcoustic Ook ? Ook !

    Joined:
    26 Nov 2010
    Posts:
    3,277
    Likes Received:
    71
    As stated, you must disable "quick boot" inside you bios.

    Root holds the OS files while Home holds the user data. With 32GB of Ram I wouldn't use any Swap partition at all, but it all depends on what you'll do with Ubuntu. If you're going to use hibernation state, then you should have a Swap the same size as your RAM.
     
  12. creative

    creative 500rwhp

    Joined:
    23 May 2014
    Posts:
    513
    Likes Received:
    42
    and make your home partition as large as you can! This is where linux stores your files etc. make it to small and you will soon run out!
     
  13. TeenGeek

    TeenGeek Worst touch typing ever.

    Joined:
    11 Feb 2011
    Posts:
    122
    Likes Received:
    1
    So, update time, I suppose. This morning, I was trying to install Ubuntu again, since I got my computer back yesterday. I turned off fastboot in windows, and my bios has no option for fastboot. I tried using gparted to get the drive partitioned, and went through the whole process, to the point that I had created 200Gb partition (just confirmed its existence in windows) and I tried it as an unallocated space, and then with it formatted to ext4, but when I ask Ubuntu to install on that partition, it say "no root file system defined" or something along those lines. How do i fix that?
    Thanks!
     
  14. theshadow2001

    theshadow2001 [DELETE] means [DELETE]

    Joined:
    3 May 2012
    Posts:
    5,199
    Likes Received:
    155
    when you are using gparted you need to mark off the intended use of the partition. I can't recall from memory how to do it exactly. But there should be an option, to set it to root which is just a forward slash symbol /

    Probably right click on something, have a look around its there somewhere.

    It may be necessary to make a swap partition as well as the root. So in that case create some space, then format it as swap rather than ext4
     
  15. creative

    creative 500rwhp

    Joined:
    23 May 2014
    Posts:
    513
    Likes Received:
    42
    you need to define the 3 partitions before linux will install. (root/home/swap) Just search on youtube, there are plenty of guides. I searched 'dual boot linux mint' when I did mine ( I was installing Mint at the time mind but the process is the same.). Made sense when I saw it being done.

    example:




    and tbh, I havent really used linux since I installed it. Its just to much messing around for me but handy for accessing HDD's that wont boot in windows.. that about it
     
    Last edited: 23 Nov 2014

Share This Page