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Build Advice Violet Haze - Custom Build i7 *Revised Specs*

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by RiverKairyn, 13 Apr 2009.

  1. RiverKairyn

    RiverKairyn The Cenobite Prototype

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    What is the difference bwteen the actual Retail Version and OEM? I don't really know the difference between the two. Could you please elaborate?

    Yeah, I tried one out in a local computer store here, and I loved it!

    Vista Ultimate 64bit because it incorporates everything you get in Home Premium and Business, but some sweet little extras!

    Yeah I want 12GB. I've heard that with some things 6GB can strain a little bit. So may as well temporarily futureproof my system to 12GB until my next big upgrade!

    Thanks for your advice! :)
     
  2. Krikkit

    Krikkit All glory to the hypnotoad! Super Moderator

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    To be honest, unless you're going to use 12GB now, you'd be better off just using 6. It really is a massive amount of RAM, and even very intensive processes will struggle to use it.

    Future-proofing is pretty much pointless tbh. You've got yourself a computer specced up there that will more than adequately function for several years without upgrading. If you do want to upgrade though, there's no point putting things in there for the sake of it, just because you want bigger numbers.

    The differences between retail and OEM are simple: Retail comes in a shiny box, with documentation, stickers, a stock heatsink, etc. OEM is often just the bare chip in a protective case.
     
  3. RiverKairyn

    RiverKairyn The Cenobite Prototype

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    Why do they do OEM's aswell then?

    & why is it that in some cases OEM's are more expensive?

    With Vista Ultimate 64bit - Is it not wise to get the OEM version? Just to get the Retail?

    Thanks!
     
  4. Krikkit

    Krikkit All glory to the hypnotoad! Super Moderator

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    OEM's are for people who don't want all the crap that comes with a retail CPU.

    Sometimes they're more expensive simply by demand, or because they are better chips (i.e. a certain batch which is better for overclocking). Sometimes it'll be because they might sell slower than the retail chips, so they are trying to sell the stock at the price for which they were purchased (if there's been a price-drop).

    With Vista it's best to go for retail if you'll keep installing on upgraded systems, otherwise OEM's fine iirc.
     
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  5. RiverKairyn

    RiverKairyn The Cenobite Prototype

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    Ah! Thanks for clearing that up!

    Do you know when the new Stepping i7 920's will be released?

    :)
     
  6. azrael-

    azrael- I'm special...

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    Concerning CPUs I personally NEVER buy a non-retail (aka. OEM or tray) CPU.

    The reason is that you pay relatively very little extra for a retail boxed CPU compared to a "bare" OEM one, which you'll usually get in a small antistatic bag. A retail CPU on the other hand will always come securely packaged and with a cooler (whether you'll use it or not). And I believe there's better warranty with retail CPUs as well. The warranty issue is more of a problem in the US than here in Europe. As far as I recall AMD for instance does not issue warranties for OEM CPUs.
     
  7. RiverKairyn

    RiverKairyn The Cenobite Prototype

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    It's settled then. I'm steering clear of OEM's
     
  8. Krikkit

    Krikkit All glory to the hypnotoad! Super Moderator

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    Warranty over here is exactly the same for OEM and Retail.

    Packaging shouldn't be an issue - all sane suppliers send 'em well packaged and in one of those chip-holder jobbies, custom-made.

    Nothing wrong with OEM's, it's just not always to suit everyone. Personally I've never bought a non-OEM CPU from new.
     
  9. azrael-

    azrael- I'm special...

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    Well, if you get a really good deal on an OEM CPU, then by all means go for it.

    But look a these prices at EBuyer. You save about £10 getting the OEM version. That's pretty typical and I for one would rather pay that little bit more and get the retail version.
     
  10. RiverKairyn

    RiverKairyn The Cenobite Prototype

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    Yeah perrhaps, but with my spec list, I haven't seen any really good deals with OEM.
     
  11. azrael-

    azrael- I'm special...

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    As for warranties, with retail versions these are backed by the manufacturer; in this case Intel. The only one backing OEM version warranties is the dealer. Should they close shop you're left with no warranty. At least that's how it works in Denmark, and I believe this holds true EU-wide.
     
  12. samkiller42

    samkiller42 For i AM Cheesecake!!

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  13. RiverKairyn

    RiverKairyn The Cenobite Prototype

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    Sorry for being a noob, but you you explain what D0 Stepping is?

    & what the differences would be from getting an i7 920 and a D0 Stepping i7 920?

    You're a star for finding that also and thanks!
     
  14. azrael-

    azrael- I'm special...

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    It's just the most recent version of the processor. They get gradually refined and bugfixed. Some bugs can and are fixed by micro code updates, which often come with BIOS updates. But Intel and AMD continually fix bugs in hardware slightly altering the chip. That's what's called doing a new stepping.

    Intel's processor finder can often be helpful in finding out about steppings.
     
  15. RiverKairyn

    RiverKairyn The Cenobite Prototype

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    Ohright, so do you know what they have added/changed to the new D0 Stepping 920?
     
  16. azrael-

    azrael- I'm special...

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    That usually gets pretty technical and is divulged in the "errata" papers. Usually a new stepping just makes the processor a bit better; lower power consumption, better overclockability etc.
     
  17. RiverKairyn

    RiverKairyn The Cenobite Prototype

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    I will be getting one of those then! :)
     
  18. samkiller42

    samkiller42 For i AM Cheesecake!!

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    Well, £10 extra for what could be a much better performer isn't half bad.
    Looks like i might have to get it my self when i start my i7 build.

    Sam
     
  19. RiverKairyn

    RiverKairyn The Cenobite Prototype

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    Haha, exactly!

    £10 is nothing compared to what you're getting additionally! Thanks for finding it BTW! :)
     
  20. Pookeyhead

    Pookeyhead It's big, and it's clever.

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    You've heard wrong :)


    Also, don't panic if you can't get a D0 stepping CPU. It's only a minor tweak, not a major redevelopment. Most C0/C1 CPUs will hit 4GHz or over on air.
     
    Last edited: 18 Apr 2009

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