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News Western Digital unveils open-source SweRV RISC-V core

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by bit-tech, 5 Dec 2018.

  1. bit-tech

    bit-tech Supreme Overlord Staff Administrator

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  2. Chicken76

    Chicken76 Member

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    Is "using" actually needed in that sentence?

    Regarding the product though, are you sure it's an integrated circuit and not a Swedish recreational vehicle? :grin:
     
  3. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    Yes, because "That WD has been playing with the open RISC-V ISA, which anyone can produce a processor design without paying a penny in royalties or licensing fees, is no secret..." is gibberish. You could move "using" a few words down, but you can't remove it without rewriting the sentence.
     
  4. edzieba

    edzieba Virtual Realist

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    Going by "the core runs at up to 1.8GHz and achieves a claimed estimated performance of 4.9 CoreMarks per megahertz", it has enough Bungholiomarks to be 1997's fastest GPU!
     
  5. Chicken76

    Chicken76 Member

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    I see the main sentence as: "That WD has been playing with RISC-V ISA is no secret."
    And you insert an explanation of what the RISC-V ISA is in a subclause delimited with commas: "(something) which anyone can produce a processor design (with) without paying a penny in royalties or licensing fees"
    You can bind the two clauses in two ways:
    • RISC-V ISA, which anyone can produce a design with
    • RISC-V ISA, using something which anyone can produce a design with
    The bolded italics are mandatory. Replace "something" with specification / intellectual property / a standard / etc.
     
  6. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    Yes, that's correct.
    Yes, except I write it as 'using which anyone can produce a processor design without paying a penny in royalties or licensing fees.' Which is a perfectly cromulent wording.
    Yes, you could rewrite the sentence in the first way - but you shouldn't, because ending a sentence - even an aside in commas - with "with" is clunky. "With which" would be better, but not as good as it is currently written.

    The second version doesn't make sense, because "something" is not defined - you'd have to write "RISC-V ISA, which is something with which anyone can produce a design," which is horrible.
    They are absolutely not mandatory, and in either case make the sentence considerably less clear and/or readable.

    The sentence, as written, is fine. "Using" could be replaced with "with" to make 'That WD has been playing with the open RISC-V ISA, with which anyone can produce a processor design without paying a penny in royalties or licensing fees, is no secret...' but that's not removing "using," that's replacing "using" - which, as I said, means you've rewritten the sentence.

    So, again: you cannot remove "using" from the sentence without replacing it with another word, and if you're doing that what's wrong with just leaving it as "using?"
     
  7. Chicken76

    Chicken76 Member

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    I'm out of arguments. It just does not sound correct to me. I'm not a native speaker, so my knowledge of the English language may be incorrect or outdated. Since no one else is submitting any opinion either way, I'll defer to your version.
    But I learned a new word today: cromulent :grin: Thank you for that!
     
  8. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    I can assure you, it is correct.
    I should probably mention that "cromulent" isn't, strictly speaking, a "real" word - before you use it in a context where Simpsons references wouldn't be appreciated!
     
  9. Chicken76

    Chicken76 Member

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    A Simpsons-originating not-a-real-word term? That's the best kind! :geek:
     
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