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Blogs What does TDP mean, Nvidia?

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Claave, 11 Nov 2010.

  1. Bakes

    Bakes New Member

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    A little question that might help you understand what is wrong with what you are saying: If only a portion of the energy that is drawn from the wall by a computer is converted into heat, what happens to the energy that is not? Does it evaporate into thin air?

    Just research the principle of conservation of energy. It should enlighten you and might empower you to study past assumptive science instead of making ignorant statements on topics you know nothing about.
     
  2. Guinevere

    Guinevere Mega Mom

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    That's quite a general thing to say. One of my cars is a VW T5 based camper, and the thought of it being limited to 80MPH like you suggest makes me shiver. I'd never get anywhere if I had to drive that slow.

    And that's just my camper van!
     
  3. Xtrafresh

    Xtrafresh It never hurts to help

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    Some people always feel the need to drive way faster then allowed, some even feel the need to tell everyone about it.

    Anyway, if cars only ever drove 130km/h, i don't think anybody would suffer too dearly from it. Do some maths on it: how much time does it save you to drive 160 vs 130 on a 100km strech? And that's assuming no lorrys are overtaking or people are sticking left at 120km/h.

    How did this turn into a debate about maximum speed? Oh wait, i did that by bringing up the stupid car analogy again. :D

    My apologies.
     
  4. Ljs

    Ljs Well-Known Member

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    Marry me!
     
  5. Adis

    Adis New Member

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    You do understand that if you have an average then you have a maximum and a minimum, else how would you calculate the average ? Then the "maximum power draw over time" wold be the maximum value you reach during your testing.

    That said I do agree that that the way it is worded "maximum power draw over time" is misleading/incorrect. You don't need the "over time" part, just "maximum power draw" would be enough.
     
  6. Adis

    Adis New Member

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    +1
     
  7. Altron

    Altron Well-Known Member

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    Yes, "maximum power draw" or "power draw over time" would be two separate things. A maximum power draw isn't an over-time measurement, because once you find the maximum you just discard the other points. It's splitting hairs, but clearly "maximum power draw over time" was not a term created by an engineer, unless he has something to hide.
     
  8. Wingtale

    Wingtale New Member

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    What happens if the water leeks all over the components?
     
  9. Bakes

    Bakes New Member

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    What, the water in the vapour chamber? There'd be a problem then - but remember that a vapour chamber is simply a larger version of the heatpipes that are in all our coolers.
     
  10. Xtrafresh

    Xtrafresh It never hurts to help

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    leeks?

     
  11. new_world_order

    new_world_order 4.0 GHz Dremel

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    The energy that is "not?" What are you, a Houyhnhnm from Gulliver's Travels?

    If you think that "energy" has anything in common with a "liquid" that could evaporate, there is no metric that can measure the order of magnitude of your ignorance.
     
  12. Bakes

    Bakes New Member

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    Again, my question is: What happens to the energy that is not released as heat - where does it go?



    Pedantry doesn't help anyone. 'Evaporate into thin air' is a figure of speech.

    Again, all energy that goes into a computer (bar the energy that goes into the fans and the leds) is released as heat energy.
     
  13. Altron

    Altron Well-Known Member

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    Clearly, he doesn't think that. He was asking you that question. Since your reading comprehension seems poor, let me rephrase it:

    Tell us, where does the energy that doesn't get converted to heat, doesn't get converted to very low-power signals on data cables, and doesn't get converted to light by the power LEDs go? You've been arguing that there is some energy that doesn't go to any of these things, so where does it go?
     
  14. mclean007

    mclean007 Officious Bystander

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    Indeed. From a thermodynamic perspective the logic (useful work) done by a computer is a decrease in entropy (information disorder) and is achieved by converting low entropy energy (electricity) into high entropy energy in the form of low level waste heat. This is required because the second law of thermodynamics states that in general the total entropy of any system will not decrease other than by increasing the entropy of some other system. So the increase in information order produced by the computer's work (a decrease in entropy in that system) is "paid for" by an increase in entropy in the surrounding atmosphere by dumping highly disordered low level heat into the air.

    As has been stated many times above, essentially all of the energy input of a computer system (ignoring the negligible amount that is output as light, data signals and electromagnetic radiation) is dumped as heat. This is the first law of thermodynamics (conservation of energy) at work and, new_world_order, you would do well to educate yourself on this simple principle before lambasting other forum users for their "ignorance". It just makes you look like a fool.
     
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