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News Windows Store Infinite Warfare gamers suffer segregation

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Gareth Halfacree, 7 Nov 2016.

  1. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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  2. Shangri-La

    Shangri-La Member

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    I've no interest in this game but this is just crazy, who on earth made that decision?
     
  3. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    The only - and I mean the only - explanation that I can come up with, and this is absolutely just guesswork, is if Microsoft was demanding unfavourable terms (like the right to heavily discount the product and pass the cost on to Activision, or taking a bigger cut of revenue than Steam) then Activision may want to lock Windows Store users out specifically 'cos they don't want people buying it from the Windows Store. For every Windows Store user who gets a refund and buys it at the higher price from Steam, Activision makes more money.

    It's a theory, but until and unless Activision goes public with a statement it'll remain exactly that.
     
  4. Anfield

    Anfield Well-Known Member

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  5. edzieba

    edzieba Virtual Realist

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    The culprit is probably Steamworks: if you're using Steamworks for multiplayer support, then steam (obviously) needs to be installed. That means that if you're distributing a game anywhere other than Steam, you need to either tell the user "go install this other program that doesn't actually do anything to do with the game because we need some dependencies", or you use another matchmaking system that is not compatible with Steamworks.
    The right thing for Activision to do would just have been to use their existing network infrastructure which would be platform-agnostic. Instead, they've used Steamworks for the Steam distribution, XB Live for the Xbox version, and something else for the Windows 10 version. And retrofit Steamworks to the MW2 pack-in, pissing off everyone who wanted to use dedicated servers like was previously possible.

    Basically, Activison don't want to bother maintain their own network code, so they've just dropped in whatever 3rd party matchmaking library was the least effort.
     
  6. Shangri-La

    Shangri-La Member

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    I suspect your right but I can't see Activision openly admitting that. :)
     
  7. Corky42

    Corky42 Where's walle?

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    Then why not just use Steam's matchmaking libraries on the Windows Store version?

    It seems more a case of Microsoft not wanting, or allowing, 3rd party matchmaking libraries. Don't games from companies like Ubisoft who have their own digital distribution network play nice with 3rd party services?
     
  8. fix-the-spade

    fix-the-spade Well-Known Member

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    Allowing Steamworks on the Win Store version would require the installing of the Steam client, which would then be used for any DLC and Micro Transaction sales. Anyone who activated a Steam version of Elite Dangerous and got subjected to the Valve Tax will be acutely aware of this.

    That was the root cause of EA removing themselves from Steam when they launched Origin, it looks like somewhere along the line Microsoft and Activision have had the same conversation.
     
  9. Corky42

    Corky42 Where's walle?

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    That makes perfect sense when we're talking about either selling it through Steam or not but not when you're selling it via two outlets, at least not from the developers view.

    If i as a developer sell a game via two outlets that both take a 30% cut from the sale of the game and include the DLC and Micro Transaction side of things from only one store then wouldn't the 30% cut from all DLC and Micro Transactions go via the store i packaged with the game.

    Wouldn't the only time a developer could be hit by a store tax twice on the same transaction be if both of them said you must use our store for DLC and Micro Transaction if you want to sell the game on our store.
     
  10. IamSoulRider

    IamSoulRider Member

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    Doesn't this stem from steam charging a company for keys registered on the steam platform. This is why not all games released outside of steam, that subsequently end up on steam, give keys to the original owners. The developer/publisher still has to pay for those keys.

    This would be a double tax, but for a slightly different reason.
     

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