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Displays Dell U2711 - Calibration

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Andre_B, 21 Apr 2012.

  1. Andre_B

    Andre_B Minimodder

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    Hi all,

    I just purchased a new Dell U2711.

    What is the best way to calibrate/set up the monitor?

    Thanks

    Andre
     
  2. GoodBytes

    GoodBytes How many wifi's does it have?

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    Nice purchase!

    This is my recommendation.
    IMPORTANT: My recommendation is for the best visuals for general computer usage (nothing will look strange). And NOT for color critical work. For color critical work, you better ask a professional, and know how to setup your software color profile, so that you have the correct colors.

    Here is what I suggest:
    -> Have the monitor connected to DVI or DisplayPort
    -> Go on the monitor full menu, and go under Color Settings. In there, set Mode Selection to Graphics, and set Present Mode to Adobe RGB.
    -> Now go to Start menu on your computer > type: color, and start the Color Management panel.
    -> From there, check the box: Use my settings for this device
    -> Click on Add button, and select sRGB virtual device model. And set it to default. Click on Close.

    You are now have the best general purposes visuals, and taking advance of the pre-color calibrated profile. Some specific colors might be a hint over saturated. But everything in general look nice.

    For critical work under a non-wide-color gamut standard, I could be wrong, but this is what I believe you need to do:
    -> Go on the monitor full menu, and go under Color Settings. In there, set Mode Selection to Graphics, and set Present Mode to sRGB.
    -> Now go to Start menu on your computer > type: color, and start the Color Management panel.
    -> From there, check the box: Use my settings for this device
    -> Select DELL U2711 Color Profile (should be on the list). And set it to default. Click on Close.

    As the monitor is a wide color gamut, and as you are forcing sRGB (non-wide color gamut) profile, Windows desktop and games will look a bit more flat, but pictures, once your configure PhotoShop, or whatever software you use, will look correct. It is best however to pull out your trusted color calibrator and calibrate your screen to have your printer and previously worked picture look the same.

    Firefox and IE 9 support color profiles (uses Windows settings), while Chrome does not (I don't know about Opera).


    Settings suggestions
    1- As you probably noticed by now.. your monitor sounds like a microwave, as you are pressing the menu buttons ("BEEEP" at every press). You can turn that off. Go on the monitor full menu > Other Settings > Button Sound > Off

    2- As you are probably noticing by now as well, is that the monitor is FREAKING BRIGHT. Feel free to set the brightness to 0.

    How to enjoy 10-bit colors
    To enjoy 10-bit colors per channel, will be a bit difficult, as everything, including games and Windows desktop are all in 8-bit colors. So only your work in PhotoShop or CAD work and alike software can be set to enjoy the full 10-bit colors.

    To set it up, see your software help documentation to know how to configure them, but aside from that:
    -> You need an Nvidia Geforce GTX 200 series or newer (sorry, AMD Radeon card don't support it) with DisplayPort on the graphic card (no adapters) on it. And connect your monitor via the DisplayPort connection. Of course, select Nvidia Quadro and FireGL/FirePro (AMD "Quadro's" if you will), also support 10-bit or more colors.
    -> You need supported drivers
    -> You need Windows 7 or later. MacOS does NOT support 10-bit or more colors.
    -> Photoshop CS5 (earlier version does not support 10-bit colors)

    10-bit color Test Picture: http://www.imagescience.com.au/kb/getattachment.php?data=MTUyfDEwIGJpdCB0ZXN0IHJhbXAuemlw

    Please note, that I have not tried the above, and no professional, and could contain some errors. Please take the above lightly. If you have any information or correction, please free to share it.

    Enjoy your U2711!
     
    Last edited: 21 Apr 2012
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  3. Andre_B

    Andre_B Minimodder

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    Thanks GoodBytes!

    Just what I was looking for.

    Rep!

    Andre
     
  4. GoodBytes

    GoodBytes How many wifi's does it have?

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    I see you posted after 1 min from my last edit. Check my edit out I added stuff :)

    Your welcome!
    Oh and Thanks for the rep, glad I could help.
     
  5. Andre_B

    Andre_B Minimodder

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    Updated. Thanks.

    This is such an amazing monitor!
     
  6. GoodBytes

    GoodBytes How many wifi's does it have?

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    No doubt about it. It's been about 2 years I have my U2410, and I am still amazed by it.
     
  7. Andre_B

    Andre_B Minimodder

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    Is it better to use DisplayPort if you're able to ?

    I'm currently using DVI.
     
  8. GoodBytes

    GoodBytes How many wifi's does it have?

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    In your case (assuming you care about 10-bit color support, let alone the exact setup to get it to work), the only advantage you'll get, is that you don't have the 2 screws on the plug anymore.

    Other advantages of DisplayPort
    -> Consumes less power than DVI (great for laptops)
    -> Supports more plug-in and out before potential breakage (great for laptops)
    -> Smaller plug (great for laptop)
    -> Has a special version of it for the internal monitor of a laptop, which consumes much less power than the current standard.
    -> If supported, can output Audio like HDMI
    -> If supported, can output Aux source (so whatever you want (well manufacture wants): USB, Firewire, Ethernet, Thunderbolt, etc...
    -> If supported by graphic card AND monitor (monitor needs a DisplayPort OUT connection as well), can be daisy chained up to 4x 1920x1200 monitor from 1 plug on the graphic card.
    -> Support longer wire length than HDMI
    -> Like DVI (but unlike HDMI), it feature a system to ensure that data sent from the graphic card is identically received by the monitor (so colors that the monitor receives is always exact from the graphic card.. now it would be the turn of the monitor and user settings of the monitor to display them correctly)
    -> Support 10, 12 and 16-bit colors per channels.
    -> Support higher resolutions than DVI.
    -> Cost less to make the cable than HDMI and DVI.
    -> Unlike HDMI, but like DVI, no royalty fees.
    -> Can be converted down with a single inexpensive adapter to HDMI (max res 1920x1200, this is a limitation of most HDMI operated device, including your monitor (my guess is because of teh super high royalty fees of the latest HDMI connector, to support higher resolutions) or to DVI (see downside bellow)

    Downside of DisplayPort:
    -> If you use a passive DisplayPort to DVI adapter (about 8-12$ Canadian/US), max resolution is 1920x1200, due that it can only convert down to a single-link DVI. So if you have a laptop with DisplayPort, that you want to connect via DVI on a larger than 1920x1200 monitor, you need to purchase an activate converter, which costs about 100$ Canadian/US today.
     
  9. Andre_B

    Andre_B Minimodder

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    Thanks!

    DVI for me then.
     
  10. Maximilian

    Maximilian WC Virgin

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    Nice monitor, welcome to the club!

    Although I am now thinking of sticking mine on the marketplace and going with three 23/24" screens... hmm
     
  11. wyx087

    wyx087 Homeworld 3 is happening!!

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    awesome guide GB, but this is what i think should be set: (copy+pasted yours, but bolded my modified parts)

    -> Have the monitor connected to DVI or DisplayPort
    -> Go on the monitor full menu, and go under Color Settings. In there, set Mode Selection to Graphics, and set Present Mode to Adobe RGB.
    -> Now go to Start menu on your computer > type: color, and start the Color Management panel.
    -> From there, check the box: Use my settings for this device
    -> Click on Add button, and select Adobe RGB virtual device model. And set it to default.
    -> Click on Advanced tag, change Device profile to "System Default (sRGB IEC61966-2.1).
    ->
    Click on Close.
    and don't forget a restart.

    i have started editing RAW files shot under AdobeRGB in Photoshop and Lightroom. with system default, everything looks wrong. with only AdobeRGB set and don't change Device profile, Adobe software looks right but every other programs look wrong. with everything set as i layed out above, exported photos in sRGB colour space opened by windows photo preview looks the same as AdobeRGB RAW files in Lightroom.

    follow the above steps also ensure games don't look over saturated because all programs will use sRGB colour space while those use AdobeRGB will also be able to stretch its legs. :thumb:



    for the 10-bit colour thing, GB, basically you are saying we need non-reference cards or a gtx 680? even then there's question of whether Geforce Forceware supports 10-bits :(
     
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  12. User-sam

    User-sam When in doubt, follow your nose.

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    Goodbytes strikes again with awesomeness! :D

    Very Nice read thank's for the tips.
     
  13. GoodBytes

    GoodBytes How many wifi's does it have?

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    Thanks! rep
    I'll try in a moment.. right now, I am working on my MX Revolution mouse, because it has a reception problem. I am looking into extending the antenna inside. And now I am wondering if a using a strip of twisted copper wire (no rubber) and attach it with the current flat copper ribbon wire, acts as a good antenna extension. Hmmm.

    P.S: The inside of the Logitech MX Rev is AWESOME.

    Sadly, that is correct. :/
     
  14. Andre_B

    Andre_B Minimodder

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    Thanks, it is nice club to be in!

    Thanks for your input. Rep!
     
  15. Ficky Pucker

    Ficky Pucker I

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    here's what i use.

    monitor preset mode - sRGB
    monitor brightness set to 25
    Color Management - sRGB IEC61966-2.1 as system default
     
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  16. Pookeyhead

    Pookeyhead It's big, and it's clever.

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    Can I suggest that if you are paying so much for a monitor, and are concerned with colour accuracy, that you buy a calibrator? All the above from Goodbytes, while worthwhile, and will produce an improvement, is still a million miles from having a correctly calibrated screen. (Yes Goodbytes.. I know you had that disclaimer saying your advice was not for colour critical work :))

    Also, the above advice from Ficky Pucker... while having advantages, also has one huge disadvantage. Using sRGB as your default colour profile will be gimping the monitor's wide gamut capabilities in ALL software. A 2711 has a wide gamut panel, and forcing sRGB as the default windows colourspace will ensure you never, ever see the wide range of colours available.... which kind of defeats the object of a wide gamut panel.

    However... using a wider colourspace also has problems. a wide gamut panel will ONLY display CORRECT colours when displaying correctly profiles images with software that honors ICC colour profiles. Most browsers do now, but unfortunately, most images on the web (including those here at bit tech) have no profile embedded. So games, and movies (and most websites) will always appear oversaturated on a wide gamut screen. My advice is to set the default windows colourspace to the ICC profile for the monitor that came with it on the disk as Goodbytes suggests... and manually switch the screen to sRGB mode when gaming or watching movies.... games may not be such an issue, as they are not reality, but oversaturated movies on a wide gamut screen can be awful... I always switch the panel to sRGB mode when watching movies.

    Using sRGB as the default windows workspace will ALWAYS force sRGB.. even in Photoshop.

    My advice is buy a colorimeter. The problem is buying one that's wide gamut friendly, so that means the Spyder 3 Pro (£89) or X-Rite i1 Pro (£159).

    You've spent a fortune on a really nice screen... why gimp it with crap colour accuracy when spending 80 quid or so (or less if you go used off ebay) can assure perfect colours? The ONLY way to get accurate colours is to calibrate it. All of the above methods on previous posts are not calibration... they're merely adjustments to get you closer.... and that's a FACT.

    [edit]

    Just to add that I always find it strange that people are willing to pay 5 or 600 quid on a screen.. or even more, then balk at paying £80 to ensure that it performs at it's maximum accuracy. I have the same problem with people who spend money on RAID0 SSD to get uber performance, and can't be arsed spending a tiny amount more on a HDD to create a back up. You've spent HUNDRENDS on your U2711... so stop being a cheapskate and buy a decent colorimeter :). Otherwise, you could have bought a much cheaper screen and not really lost a great deal in the bargain. Another point most are not aware of, is that correct calibration is not just about COLOUR! Colour acuity is highly subjective anyway and there is no such thing as a "correct" white point. I personally calibrate to 6500K, 2.2, 120CD/M2 just because it's a standard most adhere to, but some peopel prefer a 5500K white point. Your white point calibration shoudl match the lighting you work in. I have 6500K "Northlight" lighting in my room here, as most design studios and colour critical industries do, but if I had 5600K "Daylight" lighting, I'd be setting my white point to 5600K instead.

    Of FAR more importance when calibrating is getting the correct gamma, black level and BRIGHTNESS. Most people buy monitors according to specs sheets, and seeing super bright panels with 400CD/M2 specs is like WOW... do want!... however, that's too bright. In moderate room lighting your brightness should be around 120CD/M2, as that gives accuracy, good contract ratios and decent black points from a LCD. Without a colorimeter, there's no way you'll be able to measure that. Same with gamma... it's almost impossible to measure accurately without hardware. As you can see below, the gamma, luminance and black point can be carefully managed when using calibration hardware.

    [​IMG]

    That was with Lacie Blue Eye Pro measuring my Eizo, but most calibration software can generate a report including the software that comes with the Spyder 3 Pro and the X-Rite i1 Pro. You will NEVER achieve that level of accuracy using the OSD or off the shelf profiles. One could argue whether you need to, but let's be honest, most of us on here buy hardware, then overclock it, and do all manner of things we don't really NEED to do... and it's much the same here, except for one thing.. the screen is the ONE thing you devote all your attention to. It's THE interface between you and your machine no matter what you use it for. Couple that with the fact that you have a £600 screen... why would you want anything less that perfection from it? All for the sake of saving £80 or so. How silly.
     
    Last edited: 22 Apr 2012
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  17. Andre_B

    Andre_B Minimodder

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    Wow!

    Thank you for a very detailed post. I will definitely take your points on board and most likely purchase a calibrator. I just need to recover from this purchase first...:D

    Rep!

    The amount of knowledge here on the Bit-Tech forums is staggering.
     
  18. Pookeyhead

    Pookeyhead It's big, and it's clever.

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    Just to make this clear...

    That will ensure you NEVER see the full gamut of your screen... but will prevent oversaturated colours in non managed software/websites/games/movies. If you do photo editing however... do not do the above.

    If you do the above, what you are doing is telling windows to remap everything to the limited colourspace of sRGB which is far more limited to the colourspace the screen is capable of (in the case of the U2711). For instance, here's mine...

    [​IMG]

    Here, windows is mapping everything (assuming the program I'm using within Windows recognises ICC and ICM profiles) to what my monitor can handle correctly (a ICM profile created by my calibrator and software).

    If you have no calibrator available, instead of using the sRGB profile in windows, you should use the Dell U2711 ICM or ICC profile that came with your screen here, and set THAT to default. as Goodbytes suggests here...

    ...With ONE exception...

    Don't do that! For colour critical work why on earth do you want sRGB? You want to be able to see as many colours as possible. Use Adobe RGB or a custom setting in the screen's OSD that allows the full gamut.

    repeat.. setting sRGB in the Windows colour management panel will LIMIT your monitor to sRGB gamut... as will running the U2711 in sRGB mode... FACT. It WILL ensure correct colours in games, movies and web pages, but WILL also be limiting your wide gamut screen's response to that of sRGB when also editing images in photoshop etc.
     
    Last edited: 22 Apr 2012
  19. wyx087

    wyx087 Homeworld 3 is happening!!

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    strange, with the setting i posted, Adobe software look right as well as windows photo preview. whereas if you don't set in Advanced tab, all except Adobe software will look saturated. surely that would mean the Adobe software are able to utilise the wider gamut while that setting will preventing over saturation on non managed software. :confused: (at least prevent windows programs)

    thanks for the colorimeter recommendation, will try to get a Spyder 3 Pro when my bank account recovers from the camera purchase :D
     
    Last edited: 22 Apr 2012
  20. 3lusive

    3lusive Minimodder

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    True, but I think most people who buy those screens are doing so for the high resolution, not for absolute colour fidelity or accuracy (which most people do not need or care about). They want nice colours and nice viewing angles, but most people don't use professional image manipulation software, like £500 Photoshop, to view and edit images that can display colour tones outside the sRGB colour space. I think it's misleading to believe most people do that who have these displays.

    I therefore think putting the display into sRGB emulation mode is fine for 99% of people (in the absence of a calibrator), because let's face it if the person was unaware that he will be gimping his displays 'wide gamut' capabilities in certain applications, they probably would not have any experience editing images in a serious manner and thus have no use for it.
     

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