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News Government begins major piracy crackdown

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Gareth Halfacree, 20 Jul 2015.

  1. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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  2. MadGinga

    MadGinga oooh whats this do?

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    oh FFS :( *slow clap*

    Can someone please tell me how ripping a CD takes money away from the artists?
     
  3. fix-the-spade

    fix-the-spade Well-Known Member

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    Here we go again with sticks and stones against the lightning. Is this going to mean the return of those obnoxious 'you wouldn't XYZ clips at the start of every DVD? Will they spread to Netflix?
     
  4. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    Because the industry loves to nickle-and-dime its customers. You bought your music on tape, then re-bought it on vinyl 'cos it sounded better. Then CDs came out, and you bought it again. That's three sales for each album. Then we switched from CDs to MP3s, and everyone realised you could just rip the music and convert it - you didn't need to buy it again. The industry didn't like the sound of that: as far as the industry is concerned, you should put your CDs to one side and pay a fourth time for the MP3s. Then a fifth for high-resolution MP3s. Then a sixth for FLAC. Oh, you want to stream them? That'll be a seventh payment, please...
     
  5. Mr_Mistoffelees

    Mr_Mistoffelees The Lunatic on the Grass.

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    If they think I'm going to pay again, for music I've already bought, when I want to rip my CDs to my PC, I have to assume the music industry are still using the same interesting substances they all used in the 60s, when I where a lad!
     
  6. rollo

    rollo Well-Known Member

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    Major p2p pirates could not care less about what they do. Crackdown is one thing implementing it is another. With the way streaming is there is less and less reasons to buy a cd or dvd.

    And by stopping you converting them to mp3s they just lost another sale in my book why pay twice. Unless the album you want does not come on The whole host of services that offer music content.

    The music industry as a whole is run by a bunch of corrupt money grabbing idiots who have not saw the damage they have done. ITunes sells more music than anybody else for a reason. CDs are no longer popular with the youth of today.

    Id imagine most young people don't even own a CD player we live in a digital world and unless the music company's are going to offer alternatives to MP3 ripping then they may kill the entire cd market which has saw a bit of revival in recent years.

    Netflix will offer adverts soon on some of its content that's been known for a while. Dout they will implement the xyz advert as it does not really apply to them.

    Also think getting ISPs to track every users activity is a huge ask and virtually impossible to implement. They can hard block the websites but any user with a brain will bypass it. VPNs will see more widespread use and ftp downloads will become higher. Both of which the ISP can't see the data been transferred.
     
  7. IanW

    IanW Grumpy Old Git

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    Simon Cowell has done far more to end my (alleged) CD-ripping activities, than this law ever will!
     
  8. MadGinga

    MadGinga oooh whats this do?

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    Well I only ever owned two 'tapes and have never owned any vinyl. I have only ever bought CDs, and never bought anything in pure mp3-format. So from me they will be getting 'nout. :)

    To me, ripping a CD doesn't equate to loss of sale in another format. The same way downloading a copy of a film/tv series does not equate to a loss of sale. It might, but it might not.

    What they should be focusing on is the people making money from it, not public Joe swapping the odd CD with a mate.

    Question, will this affect Amazon's "pre-rip" service?
     
  9. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    No, because Amazon negotiates the right for that with the rightsholder seperately; that's why it's only available on selected CDs.
     
  10. RedFlames

    RedFlames ...is not a Belgian football team

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    So if this went ahead the maximum penalty for Pirating a CD [10 yrs] would, iirc, be longer than the maximum sentence for stealing an actual CD [7 yrs]...
     
  11. DriftCarl

    DriftCarl Member

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    But what if you then rip the CD? You are looking at 17 years then
     
  12. Parge

    Parge the worst Super Moderator

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    Apart from the fact that they've literally just come out and said the total opposite to the WSJ.

    "Netflix spokesman: We have zero intention of putting ads on our platform; no change at all in policy."

    https://twitter.com/emilysteel/status/605454849832927232

    Don't say things with certainty unless you are 100% sure, and can back it up with a source.
     
  13. Yadda

    Yadda Well-Known Member

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    I don't think anyone is saying that you'll get 10 years for pirating a CD. The increased sentence is aimed at organised criminals.

    Edit: From the BBC:

    "The proposed measures are mainly targeted at the distributors of pirated content - the people creating copies of movies, sometimes before release, and uploading them to be downloaded by thousands upon thousands.
    It's not, the police are clear to point out, aimed at small-time downloaders - although there are other ways and means to prevent that too."

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-33578180
     
  14. Corky42

    Corky42 Where's walle?

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    Seems a bit harsh to lump someone format shifting their CD collection in with organised criminals doesn't it?
     
  15. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    Aye, just like the surveillance laws were aimed at terrorists. They didn't get used on everyone from human rights organisations to suspected benefits cheats at all.

    Oh, wait. The other thing. They totally did. Along with people who might be putting non-recyclables in the recycling bin and vice-versa.

    If the law allows, by design or accident, for someone downloading a single music track from a peer-to-peer network - an act which, by design, also involves said someone 'sharing' parts of the track with hundreds or even thousands of other users, hence 'peer-to-peer' - to get ten years in the chokey, then you just know some poor bugger is going to get exactly that regardless of assurances from those in power that it's only to punish proper, actual, nasty criminal types and not Joe Bloggs from up the road.
     
  16. Yadda

    Yadda Well-Known Member

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    Woa, hold your horses for one moment. I said "ripping a CD" (edit: correction, I said "pirating a CD"), I didn't mention P2P at all.

    Your story could create the impression that "OMG the evul govmmunt is gonna giv us 10 years in chokey for ripping our own CD's!".

    I was merely pointing out that nobody is going to get 10 years for ripping a CD they own into, for example, MP3 format for their phone/car or whatever.
     
    Last edited: 20 Jul 2015
  17. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    True, but you could change P2P for any other common method of piracy (bar buying hooky discs from that bloke down the pub, which I guess would come under Receiving Stolen Goods, perhaps?) and my point still stands.
    Well, technically, it could. If you're done for criminal piracy, you're done under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 - which is exactly what the government is proposing extending the maximum penalty on. Sure, you wouldn't, because that'd be ridiculous (and because it's impossible to police), but the point still stands: you could. (Also, there are three separate points in the story: the revocation of permission to rip your own CDs, the potential extension to the maximum digital copyright violation penalty, and the impending PR campaign and ISP warning letters. None of the three would have made a very meaty news story on its own, but by putting all three in a single story it was worth a post; apologies for any confusion caused as a result.)
    You're quite right, that'd be ridiculous - but ridiculous sentences do, sometimes, happen. Six months in chokey for stealing £3.50's worth of bottled water is but one example that sprung to mind.

    As I say, though, it's a crime that's impossible to police anyway - well, until the government succeeds in its goal to ensure that all digital systems are back-doored and decrypted, in which case your computer will dob you in the first chance it gets...
     
  18. Yadda

    Yadda Well-Known Member

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    Sorry Corky, I missed this.

    That's kinda my point - they aren't being lumped together. They are separate issues.
     
  19. rollo

    rollo Well-Known Member

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    We are all discussing a law that has never been heavily enforced and in the past has lead to countless court cases been dismissed from court.

    Whats to say this will be any different. The last Major p2p case agaist a single home user was not a sucess. They have attempted to prosecute children before and had it thrown out of court.

    To be sucessful they have to prove the person they are charging was the downloader and its nearly impossible to do with the way WIFI connections are today.

    And they have tried to force ISPs to get stricter on it but if one blocks p2p downloads totally they will go to court and lose and it would block access to many other things that rely on p2p.

    Most major online games require P2P access so they cant even port block. Virgins traffic management system reduced the speed on those ports for years in WoWs early days at peak times with countless issues caused to Virgin users ( AOL Was just as bad ) at the time.

    To anyone that is not aware basically from 6pm uk till 11pm uk WoW was virtually unplayable in 1.5 years of the 3 year orginal vanilla launch window, Ping went from 20 to 450. Alot of people from the uk in a few guilds we shared the server with had alot of issues till they left. They were not the only ISP to have issues with wow. AOL was another.)

    Bethere gained widespread popularity in the WoW UK community as they did not hamper the game experience.

    Even to this day WoW on Virgin media is not always a great experience.
     
  20. Baguette

    Baguette New Member

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    I was feeling rather unhappy with all of this until I realised that I have never owned a CD, nor purchased an album or track. I pay for subscription services and streaming. But still, what a shame it must be for people who have amassed a huge collection of titles in hard format, and are now stuck enjoying it using outdated, impractical tech.

    Will people who have already ripped music be obliged to delete the now illegal copy? How will they enforce this law if it isn't through mass surveillance?
     

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