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Help needed picking a (hand?) drill

Discussion in 'Modding' started by ifohancroft, 6 Jan 2019.

  1. ifohancroft

    ifohancroft New Member

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    Hello,

    As much as I have tried, I have come to the realisation that I can't do everything with just a dremel (go figure :D), so I have decided to get a drill.

    I know what I am going to be using it for but I don't know which brands and models are good, nor which drills can fit the bits I need in order to do the stuff I want or what speed the bits need and whether the specific drill will support them.

    I would like to ask you for suggestions about a good and reliable drill that I can use for the following things. If some of the stuff I want to do with the drill are not possible or it's unrealistic to want to do them with a drill, please let me know.

    I don't have a set budget (although, at the same time, I don't want to pay something like $500), so feel free to suggest what you think is the best model.

    I'd like to be able to:

    • Drill, thread and countersink scew holes (I believe I won't be getting any smaller than m3 screws) into wood (hardwood, as well as mdf & such), plastic, metal (aluminum and steel mostly) and acrylic/plexiglass.
    • Drill cable management holes (around 60mm diameter) in wood (hardwood, as well as mdf & such) in wood not thicker than 32mm.
    • Drill up to 220mm diameter fan holes into wood (hardwood, as well as mdf & such) (not thicker than 32mm), couple of mm of aluminum (I believe not thicker than 5mm) and steel (I believe not thicker than 3mm).
    • I am probably forgetting something at the moment.
    I look forward to suggestions about brands and models of drills that can do the aforementioned.

    P.S. Happy New Year and I hope I am not posting in the wrong sub-forum.

    Best Regards,
    IFo Hancroft
     
    Last edited: 7 Jan 2019
  2. Xlog

    Xlog Active Member

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    Budget?
    For a cordless one- pick a brand that fits your budget and has the lineup of tools you'd potentially want to buy (interchangeable batteries) and go from there. Don't buy tools with ni-cd or non-interchangeable batteries (most sub 19V are such) , unless you are on a very tight budget.
     
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  3. ifohancroft

    ifohancroft New Member

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    I don't really have a budget (but I don't want to pay something like $500 either). I'll just save as much as I have to, to get a good one that will hopefully last me for years. I don't insist on a cordless one. I don't know which brands are good though and even if I pick a brand, I don't know which model to get. Hence the reason for asking for suggestions about specific drill models.
     
    Last edited: 7 Jan 2019
  4. Cheapskate

    Cheapskate Insane? or just stupid?

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    I really don't know how good the newer motors are, but a corded drill should last decades of hard use. I have two like this, and they are still fine. One was used to grind the paint off a very large van, getting so hot I had to wear gloves to hold it. The only issue would be that the trigger speed goes from slow to HOLY SH*T!! fast too easily.
    I've burned up several newer cordless drills, the Chinese motors are awful. My older cordless drills I can't get batteries for, and don't want to rebuild them.
    TLDR: Corded won't go bad in long storage, have more power, and are cheaper in the long run.
    Keyless chucks are great too.
     
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  5. ifohancroft

    ifohancroft New Member

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    Thanks so much! Do you think the bits opening of this one will support all the different attachments and support the different speeds needed for the different use cases? (I mean as for example the drill bit for m3 screws is very tiny while the bit for the holesaw is usually quite big, also how some materials or use cases require you to do them at a particular speed). Also, yeah, I am definitely up for a corded one. In-fact I prefer a corded one.

    P.S. I may not be able to find this exact one in the local stores. Would you be able to tell me which specifications I should be looking at to make sure a drill can do what I need it to? I have found one that I like but am not quite sure if it can do what I need to: Bosch Universalimpact 800
     
    Last edited: 9 Jan 2019
  6. Cheapskate

    Cheapskate Insane? or just stupid?

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    That was just an example. I'm sure newer corded drills have better speed control. :lol:
    Any drill will hold tiny bits. That's why they can slip on bigger bits. -They grip the little ones better.
    Features I'd look for, but are not critical:
    Chuck: 3/8" will work. Most drill bits are cut down to fit 3/8" anyway. Keyless chucks are convenient, keyed can be tightened harder.
    Variable speed trigger: I don't think you can buy one without this anymore.

    Optional: A squared to the drill mounting point for handholds. Like this. A modder could use that handle mount spot for guides or a sloppy drill press thing. :lol:
     
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  7. ifohancroft

    ifohancroft New Member

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    Thank you very much! I will check the drill I like further but I believe I've made my choice: Bosch AdvancedImpact 900
     
  8. Kernel

    Kernel Likes cheese

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    I know it looks like you have made your decision, but I'll jump in quick.
    I'm pretty much known as a tool snob, I don't spend ridiculous amounts but I always get the best I can afford.
    Your use case is a bit different to mine, I was working down South for a year doing cables installation so had a drill for working with containment and breaking through walls, among other tools of course.
    I'd highly recommend a battery combi drill due to the portability of it.
    This is a decent deal if you could stretch to it. https://www.its.co.uk/pd/DHP482KIT-DHP482-Hammer-Drill---Kit-_MAKDHP482KIT.htm
    Drill, single 4Ah battery, charger and little case.
    Ultimately it depends on how much you are going to use it and if you are will/able to stretch to the additional cost.
     
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  9. The_Crapman

    The_Crapman Don't phone it's just for fun.

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    I would go for 2 drills. One beefy corded powerfully for heavy work like steel, one lighter cordless one you can easily use one handed for more delicate stuff.
     
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  10. ifohancroft

    ifohancroft New Member

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    Thank you! Additional ideas and suggestions are always welcome!
     
  11. ifohancroft

    ifohancroft New Member

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    Makes sense (to have two, one for power and one for portability)
     

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