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Planning Help with cutting an alu panel. CNC/laser/water?

Discussion in 'Modding' started by quizz_kid, 13 Jan 2015.

  1. quizz_kid

    quizz_kid Squid

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    Hi guys

    Im going to start my new build soon and Im looking for help reg a custom alu cutting job.

    If someone here with access to CNC/laser/water could help me out, please send me a PM.
    I live in Sweden, so I'd prefer someone living in Europe for simple logistics. I'm paying of course

    Help much appreciated!
    //Quizz
     
  2. Nexxo

    Nexxo * Prefab Sprout – The King of Rock 'n' Roll

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    Try Skyrip --he has a CNC setup and lives in the Netherlands. But have you thought of simply Googling a small laser cutting company in Sweden?
     
  3. quizz_kid

    quizz_kid Squid

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    Yeah, you're right. Maybe try something local. Thanks for the tip nexxo!!
     
  4. Attila

    Attila still thinking....

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    Gee whizz dude, I've watched you make some amazing things. Why not just cut it yourself?
     
  5. quizz_kid

    quizz_kid Squid

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    Might end up doing just that =)
     
  6. Nexxo

    Nexxo * Prefab Sprout – The King of Rock 'n' Roll

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    A CNC cut gives you straighter lines and better curves. Doing it yourself is tricky unless you use a jigsaw with a ruler to guide the cut. I use a piercing saw for short cuts but it wouldn't do for long cuts.
     
  7. Attila

    Attila still thinking....

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    You can do high quality work with a jigsaw and some files. You don't need to use 'a ruler to guide the cut'. If you are cutting sheet or plate up to 10mm, careful finishing by hand will give you quality that approaches mill cutting. I have always aimed for 0.5mm accuracy in my work and get, or exceed this without too much trouble (no where near cnc accuracy, but very good for what we do here) . For more info on cutting by hand, just click on my link and go to 'guides'.
     
  8. Nexxo

    Nexxo * Prefab Sprout – The King of Rock 'n' Roll

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    That's true (the guides are useful, thanks) although I try to work to 0.2-0.1mm accuracy if possible (with the small brass parts that involve tapping threads into or mechanical movement etc.). For large aluminium pieces such precision is unnecessary I suppose. Good quality files can perform miracles in skilled hands --and are pretty good in unskilled hands like mine, I'm learning. I must admit my experience with jigsaws has been limited to units of dubious quality, so that may have affected the results.
     
  9. Teelzebub

    Teelzebub Up yours GOD,Whats best served cold

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    Personally I find a small angle grinder with a ultra thin metal cutting blade to be more accurate for straight lines and external curves and just finish with a decent file, I can get better than 0.5mm accuracy with the angle grinder and I find it's good for steel, aluminium and plastic's.

    A scroll saw is the tool for fine work

    Of course I could use the mill for straight lines and soon the CNC I'm building

    Problem with jig saws is they cut slow have a wide blade so not good for small curves and have side movement in the blade even the expensive ones do and the less accurate the cut the more filing and cleaning up you have to do.
     
    Last edited: 19 Jan 2015
  10. Attila

    Attila still thinking....

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    Oh, I didn't mean that you could get any degree of accuracy with a jigsaw. Sorry. :blush:

    The cuts will always need to be cleaned up with a file. In the op's case, I'm merely pointing out that It's relatively simple to cut and finish a part at home without too much fuss.:)
     
  11. Teelzebub

    Teelzebub Up yours GOD,Whats best served cold

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    Wasn't having a dig or anything I know you turn out some great work, I just find people cringe when I mention angle grinder lol I've used heavy duty type tools most of my life so I'm at home with them but tbh a 4.5" angle grinder is actually a real universal tool for cutting and grinding and I don't believe in making extra work for myself and the jigsaw does just that tbh the jig saw is the last tool I would recommend.
     
    Last edited: 19 Jan 2015

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