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Other Home Automation?

Discussion in 'General' started by Mojo, 8 Jan 2019.

  1. wolfticket

    wolfticket Downwind from the bloodhounds

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    I think that's more down to the general location and nature of a car vs. a house, rather than the actual locking system/mechanism. I think most houses are less intrinsically secure than modern cars.
     
  2. heh-

    heh- curses.

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    Currently renovating a house and I would have loved to wire in some home automation stuff, however I was voted down by the CEO of my marriage. I did manage to persuade her for some automation in the downstairs window shutters so we can set them to go down and up when on holiday to make it look like there is someone in the house.

    I may get some automation in the heating system, however that is on hold at the moment as the plumber thought it would be a good idea to take an angle grinder to an asbestos insulated pipe.
     
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  3. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    I dunno: it's a lot easier to drive a car off than a house...

    (But seriously: cars ain't secure in terms of keep-baddies-out, only keep-baddies-from-turning-the-engine-on, at best. All car side windows shatter impressively when given a sharp tap with a window-breaking tool - like the little spike on the bottom of the Boker Plus Tech Tool 1 in my pocket right now - whereas it's a little more effort to shatter a double-glazed house window.)
     
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  4. ElThomsono

    ElThomsono Well-Known Member

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    I would disagree, double glazing is plate glass, far more brittle than toughened automotive glass. I'll bet I could punch my way into my house far more easily than my car?

    When I was looking into home security, I categorised burglars into three sets:

    Opportunists who will come in through an open door or window.
    Those who will try to force a door or window.
    Those who will break a window and climb in.

    The first set can be kept out with minimum effort, the third can't be kept out unless you go mad with expense, and the middle set are where I focused my efforts. Upgraded my locks against snapping attacks and made sure all the windows engaged properly.
     
  5. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    I thought double-glazing was toughened, too? Even if it's not, you'll still need two swings to get through double-glazing - and only one for a car window.

    (Just looked it up: building regs state that windows must be safety - toughened, laminated, or wired - glass if the sightline is <800mm from finished floor level or within 300mm of a door, otherwise it can be straight plate.)
     
  6. ElThomsono

    ElThomsono Well-Known Member

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    I've still got some single glazing on the books!
     
  7. wolfticket

    wolfticket Downwind from the bloodhounds

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    The nature of a car is that you can't have double glazing. If you could, or conversely couldn't on a house, I think a modern car is in a lot of ways (doors, locking systems, keys) more secure than a house.
     
  8. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    I think a modern car is more secure than some houses - those with old, easily-snapped locks, easily kicked-in doors, easily broken single-pane plate-glass windows, and so on. That's not a fair comparison, though: comparing a decent modern car to a decent modern house means you'll likely find the house more secure in terms of preventing entry.

    My house is: toughened double glazing, secure door with multi-point locking system, high-security lock with anti-snap/anti-pick/anti-drill protection (saw an expert locksmith attack one on a YouTube video once, in ideal conditions with it held in a vice in a well-lit studio: he picked it, but it took a good 45 minutes!).

    My car is: toughened single glazing, secure door with single-point locking system, medium-security lock and while snapping isn't a worry a slim jim down the window tends to work a treat.

    Given the choice of having to break into one or t'other, I'd go car every single time: slim jim if I've got one, or fancy making one out of the steel bits of the windscreen wipers, quick smashed window if not.
     
  9. wolfticket

    wolfticket Downwind from the bloodhounds

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    I think if anything this is an even less fair comparison. Assuming every entry point matches your main door you're comparing a fairly atypical house with with a fairly typical car.
     
  10. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    My main door is my only door: I live in a back-to-back terrace. You're either coming in the front or knocking down one of my neighbours' walls!
     
  11. wolfticket

    wolfticket Downwind from the bloodhounds

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    When I say entry points I mean including windows (chimneys, tunnels... :happy:), since we're talking about nefarious types here.
     
  12. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    You mean the windows I very clearly included in my original post?
    There are two windows at ground level in my house: living room and bathroom. Both are toughened double-glazed glass. Both have small opening parts at the top, which are key-locked and left locked when the house is unoccupied (thus can be safely compared to the car window, which can be rolled down but is left locked in the closed position when the car is unoccupied.)
     
  13. wolfticket

    wolfticket Downwind from the bloodhounds

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  14. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    You were the one talking about doors:
    Obviously my windows don't match my main door, because they're windows and not doors. My original comment covered all entry points: my windows (toughened, double-glazed, locking) and my door (secure, multi-point lock).

    I still maintain that it's far, far easier to break into an average car than an average home. And certainly a lot easier to break into my specific car than my specific home.

    EDIT:
    There are surprisingly few videos coming up on YouTube for "smashing/breaking double-glazed window," but this incredibly cheesy production took a fair bit of punishment. Car windows? Not so much.
     
    Last edited: 9 Jan 2019
  15. wolfticket

    wolfticket Downwind from the bloodhounds

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    I think you're being obtuse. I was clearly talking about locking systems, specifically modern electronic locking systems of cars (which is still, albeit increasing tenuously, linked to the topic of the thread). You keep coming back to glazing (and related weaknesses) and specific examples relating to the differing form factors of cars and houses, both of which I have already said are obviously not comparable.
     
  16. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    And I think you're being obtuse (hey, we have that in common, at least!) 'cos the discussion started with the following statement:
    Doesn't matter how good the lock on your car is - and I refer you to the two videos I linked on using a slim jim for evidence that it simply ain't that good - if I can just tap the window and walk off with all your worldly possessions. Even shiny Teslas aren't immune to that (bonus points for the fact that the alarm apparently doesn't trigger unless the door is opened...)
     
  17. jinq-sea

    jinq-sea 'write that down in your copy book' Super Moderator

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    On the subject of coming through walls to break in, that happened to me some ten years ago. The thieves couldn't get through the door, so they knocked down part of the wall in the shared corridor between my place and the neighbours' place. Made one hell of a mess, I can tell you.
     
  18. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    Props for effort, though. Little harder here - these terraces are over a hundred years old and the walls are thiiiiiick. Plus you'd have to get inside the neighbour's house first...
     
    Last edited: 9 Jan 2019
  19. wolfticket

    wolfticket Downwind from the bloodhounds

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    Gareth's house:

    [​IMG]

    :happy:
     
  20. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    ZOMBIE FORTRESS!
     

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