1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Illegal downloaders 'face UK ban'- VM to Pilot Scheme

Discussion in 'Serious' started by steveo_mcg, 12 Feb 2008.

  1. dom_

    dom_ --->

    Joined:
    4 Jan 2004
    Posts:
    3,942
    Likes Received:
    8
    Don't get your knickers in a twist just because someone is threatining to remove your access to illegal file downloading.
     
  2. Tim S

    Tim S OG

    Joined:
    8 Nov 2001
    Posts:
    18,881
    Likes Received:
    78
  3. freedom810

    freedom810 Minimodder

    Joined:
    3 Dec 2007
    Posts:
    592
    Likes Received:
    2
    Maybe its just me but i don't really like the idea of my ISP having my bank details, what if they employ some dodgy person who just writes loads down??
     
  4. C-Sniper

    C-Sniper Stop Trolling this space Ądmins!

    Joined:
    17 Jun 2007
    Posts:
    3,028
    Likes Received:
    126
    isn't there a new torrent redesign in the works that should solve all of this? not just encryption but a while new layout of how things are downloaded.
     
  5. Ryu_ookami

    Ryu_ookami I write therefore I suffer.

    Joined:
    11 Mar 2004
    Posts:
    3,363
    Likes Received:
    138
    from what I understand as I don't download films or music or files of any kind ever (/Ryu smiles nicely at the ISP monitoring operative who is now reading this thread). Films, Cd's etc are zipped and then seperated into chunks so that its easier to download and share. The idea being the smaller the part of the file the faster that you will be able to share that part with other users.

    So I presume Rapidshare works on the same principle but unless the file is named something blatant such as "Heres a film to download" :). The powers that be are never going to know after all EVEN if they search for all video files over a certain size being downloaded whats to say that aunt Betty isn't downloading videos of uncles Charlie's holidays rather than that movie she wanted to see.

    * no aunts or uncles were harmed in the typing of this post. any resemblance to any aunts or uncles is purely coincidental and highly unlikely as well as silly after all who names the kids Betty and Charlie.
     
    Last edited: 12 Feb 2008
  6. mclean007

    mclean007 Officious Bystander

    Joined:
    22 May 2003
    Posts:
    2,035
    Likes Received:
    15
    Nope, but then that's why they are encrypted. My ISP can do all the deep packet inspection it wants, but unless it has developed a quantum computer to crack a 128 bit SSL link, all it is going to see is the outside of an HTTPS connection to my bank.
     
  7. EvilRusk

    EvilRusk What's a Dremel?

    Joined:
    23 Jan 2006
    Posts:
    110
    Likes Received:
    2
    Having worked for a bank, you would be horrified at how insecure your own bank details are at your own bank. Many of the people they employ are agency staff with no credit checks and even less of an idea of the data protection act...
     
  8. Joeymac

    Joeymac What's a Dremel?

    Joined:
    3 Oct 2006
    Posts:
    243
    Likes Received:
    0
    Interesting news... Does filesharing still take up 80% of the traffic on the internet? If it does then it's pretty much been the prime reason for connection bandwidth increases, and internet growth in general, for the past... 12 years (?) at this point. That's billions and billions people have paid to ISPs in the drive for the faster speeds. Before the youtubes of recent times..... what exactly was the point of faster connections? There wasn't much reason to have multi megabit speeds.
    The Napsters and WinMX's of old were 100% of the reason for online music market as it is at the moment (Probably a massive Billion dollar industry). Continued filesharing has made that music DRM free.... if it continues (which it will) then it'll make online music properly priced to reflect the lack of distribution costs in this new market for the dieing music industry. Then there's the revolution of the artists selling their own products, the end of evil music labels and the "contract" ... the transition of which has only just begun. Of course the "MP3" format itself was popularised by the need to push the files over the internet. If anyone thinks the ipod would exist if it wasn't for files sharers... they are kidding themselves. How many billions do mp3 players rake in of a year?
    Then there's video and TV. BBC iplayer... 4OD all these systems use secure P2P services. The development of that software was done by filesharers. It's free video distribution so EVERYONE is able to be their own distributor. Podcasts are only the beginning of what is possible for this. P2P through those legitimate channels is going to be the legal excuse for symmetrical net connections.

    I can't see that filesharing has done anything but drive innovation and demonstrate new possibilities for business. Where exactly is the loss?... music, film, games all make more money than they ever have. Where would we be now if they were able to lock down the internet and effectively jail all "illegal" filesharers from the outset? The internet would be really crap...
     
  9. Firehed

    Firehed Why not? I own a domain to match.

    Joined:
    15 Feb 2004
    Posts:
    12,574
    Likes Received:
    16
    I'll go with about -4 years.
     
  10. hawky84

    hawky84 SilentModder

    Joined:
    15 Nov 2007
    Posts:
    101
    Likes Received:
    0
    "Piracy stifles innovation and threatens the long term health of our industry"

    Hmmm how many years have I been hearing this? I mean yes there has been a lot of cr&p music and films released over the last couple of years... but joking aside if they stopped spending so much money on preventing people from illegally downloading and cut the cost of their goods and made an excellent pay monthly scheme (like napster has for music) for downloading high quality media. Then wouldn't they invertably be cutting down on illegal downloading and also keep making a bucket load of money?

    If they do start monitoring our connections isn't that just going to add a whole load of traffic from UKs already struggling infrastructure? Best I get out of my upto 8Mb adsl line is 350Kb :( at the moment anyway
     
  11. stoobs

    stoobs a multi tool

    Joined:
    28 Jul 2007
    Posts:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Its madness so your saying it will be on amount of traffic passin well thats just nuts cause rgardlss of it being say a legal torrent ie game demos or patches this could get picked up in that swarm and then it goes down this 3 strike route away tae f*** OUTRAGOUS. I have been with my isp for years and thats what your gonna do to a loyal customer - cheers. I see no way that his should be passed its lunacy
     
  12. stoobs

    stoobs a multi tool

    Joined:
    28 Jul 2007
    Posts:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    hawky well said mate
     
  13. D3s3rt_F0x

    D3s3rt_F0x What's a Dremel?

    Joined:
    28 Oct 2004
    Posts:
    719
    Likes Received:
    6
    Whats this legislation gonna do except allow ISPs to look through my packets not like it matters anything I dont want them to see is encrypted, for those not in the know some newsgroup providers offer SSL encryption on there services.

    Personally I'd love to see a decent service where I pay a few quid a month and get all the music I want however as soon as these services come up everyone points the finger and shouts price fixing so ends up becoming one big mess with EU and american commisions looking at them.
     
    Last edited: 12 Feb 2008
  14. Bungle

    Bungle Rainbow Warrior

    Joined:
    7 Jul 2007
    Posts:
    1,001
    Likes Received:
    2
    This pretty much will make the whole issue mute. Encrypted file transfers will make everyone immune from prosecution. Unless they have the right to see what decryption software your using, the data packets will be meaningless. I imagine plans are afoot already.
     
  15. Cheapskate

    Cheapskate Insane? or just stupid?

    Joined:
    13 May 2007
    Posts:
    11,848
    Likes Received:
    1,533
    Why, it will be the death of the internet cafe! (snort!)
    The proxy server industry will explode!
     
  16. Techno-Dann

    Techno-Dann Disgruntled kumquat

    Joined:
    22 Jan 2005
    Posts:
    1,672
    Likes Received:
    27
    Well, that does me no good - I use The Pirate Bay to find linux distro torrents. Nothing illegal about that...

    Madness? This is SPARTA!

    You make a very good point, though. There are a lot of people who use torrents for perfectly legal things, and termination of service (most likely with prejudice) is a rather harsh thing to do to someone who may not have done anything wrong in the first place. ISPs aren't going to spend the money to install proper filter/sniffers, so who does that leave us with to tell who is pirating? The RIAA? Don't make me laugh.
     
  17. cyrilthefish

    cyrilthefish What's a Dremel?

    Joined:
    15 Apr 2004
    Posts:
    1,363
    Likes Received:
    99
    I'll just shamelessly quote from the BBC blog here, as they've covered most of the points here :lol:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/technology/2008/02/uk_takes_tough_stance_on_pirac.html

    The main point i feel, it would require all communications to be monitored, at great expense to everyone, despite the fact it can be extremely easily bypassed by enabling encryption...

    It's a lot similar to the whole DRM issue, as in it'd vastly inconvenience everyone except the people they're trying to target.:duh:

    That is, unless you go down the extreme path of banning all encrypted traffic or forcing you to release the encryption keys to all traffic... :nono:

    Very nice and perfectly applicable analogy here :clap:
     
  18. DriftCarl

    DriftCarl Minimodder

    Joined:
    2 Nov 2004
    Posts:
    602
    Likes Received:
    12
    Well it would get me off the internet and into the outside world a bit :p
    If only they stopped flattering themselves and didnt think that the music they are producing now is even worth downloading for free.
     
  19. Dreaming

    Dreaming What's a Dremel?

    Joined:
    31 Jan 2007
    Posts:
    589
    Likes Received:
    7
    This is rather stupid.

    It's turning a civil crime (copyright theft / infringement / piracy) and pretending it's a criminal crime. So whilst murder and such are normally seen as grevious crimes that are seen in a criminal court - where you will wait in a jail cell then be taken in a police van to a dock with a security guard, and things such as copying someone's idea and passing it off on your own will normally just go to civil court where you will get a letter to turn up on this day, with a hefty fine if found guilty 'on the balance of probablities'. Yet here we see the government taking a pro-active role in a civil matter to force people to comply to the whims of corporations, with significant repercussions in line with criminal prosecution.

    I'm not saying it's justified to steal music, but I do think that we're in a pretty poor state (see the article on the public vs the RIAA) - governments are capitulating to big business in giving up their citizens freedoms in the nature of preserving profits. Having said that, the only music I listen to is trash broadcasted on CSS servers 'everyone was kung fu fighting' so it won't affect me. Who is the party we vote for that will not give up our right to privacy, our right not to be spied on in the name of profits. I don't mind the government snooping on me if they think I'm going to blow something up - fair enough - but I do object to some music producer spying on me (by proxy, i.e. the ISP does it on their behalf) in case I downloaded one of his songs. He shouldn't have that right to my stuff at all.

    I mean, isn't that what the fricking data protection act was brought in to stop? Just like the US who chucked the geneva convention out when it became inconvenient, our government is now ignoring the rights of people to have privacy. And anyway, at the £2000 a song the RIAA charges for downloaded songs, it's just going to be a cash cow. They'll be seeding the damn files because they'll make a heck of a lot more money catching people out than legitimate consumers. They'll even put the consumers off with draconian DRM measures. It's not been profitable up until now, but with this sort of framework, it's not far until they can gather evidence quickly and bring court cases in quickly and get a good turnover from it. Sounds ridiculous? Well it is, the whole situation is ridiculous. [/rant]
     
  20. Archtronics

    Archtronics Minimodder

    Joined:
    27 Jun 2006
    Posts:
    2,556
    Likes Received:
    62
    Isnt it actually illegal for your ISP to look at what you download under the data protection act?
     

Share This Page