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News Lincolnshire boy arrested over WiFi theft

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by CardJoe, 31 Oct 2008.

  1. CardJoe

    CardJoe Freelance Journalist

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  2. Clocked

    Clocked Yar! It be drivin' me nuts...

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    It is up to network owners to secure their own equipment, as it is up to the owner of a car to secure that before they leave. I also have a hard time understanding why the police acted at all, surely this is a matter for the lawyers to sort out...
     
  3. Jamie

    Jamie ex-Bit-Tech code junkie

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    The police should have just issued a warning.
     
  4. Neoki

    Neoki Member

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    Hahaha you are kidding me I live in Lincoln and not heard of this yet
     
  5. plagio

    plagio New Member

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    meh, I don't know. I don't know how it works in the UK but here in Italy when a provider connects you to the internet they never set your wireless access point with any encryption whatsoever. How the hell is my Mom supposed to know how to enter the access point web server and enable the encryption ? As a consequence nearly every place here in Rome is full of default SSID names of unencrypted wireless. Again, how the hell is my Mom supposed to know which network her laptop is connected to ?

    They should start using access points with hardware encryption that can not be disabled or something like that.

    PS I did encrypt my Mom access point.
     
    Last edited: 31 Oct 2008
  6. johnnyboy700

    johnnyboy700 Active Member

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    I agree, if you don't secure your WiFi then its your own fault if it gets hijacked and I don't believe it should be considered a criminal offence. How many times do we hear about either a burgalry or car crime because of a house or car being left unlocked and the insurance companies say "sorry mate if you left it unlocked then its your fault, you're not covered". An unsecured network is the same thing as far as I'm concerned

    If you ask Windows to search for available networks then it will show all it can detect and if one pops up as available and unsecured can we all honestly say that we wouldn't be tempted to try it?
     
  7. skpstr

    skpstr New Member

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    If you run an unencrypted wireless network and someone uses it then the responsibility and cost for pursuit of legal action should rest on you. If your network is secured properly and you find out someone has hacked it, then it's probably time to involve the police as it might not just be you that is being attacked.
     
  8. kenco_uk

    kenco_uk I unsuccessfully then tried again

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    Wireless hardware should come set up with at least wpa.
     
  9. airchie

    airchie New Member

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    If he accessed the the router and disabled encryption on it, then yes, book him.
    If the network was never secured I'd be more inclined to charge the owners of the router than the guy accessing it 'illegally'.
     
  10. 13eightyfour

    13eightyfour Formerly Titanium Angel

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    I live in lincolnshire aswell and i never heard about the story? One of my neighbours has an unsecured network, and depending on where i am in MY flat Windows does sometimes connect to theres instead of mine!
     
  11. airchie

    airchie New Member

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    Not sure how easy this would be to achieve.
    It would be simple to have a wizard that prompts you to set it up though, its not rocket science.
    And anything less than WPA with a strong password (WEP, MAC filtering, hiding SSID etc) is useless for security anyway.
     
  12. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    Easy - it's how Sky ship their routers to their customers. The WPA PSK is pre-configured, and included as both a business-card sized note in the box and on a sticker attached to the base of the router. The manual - such as it is - tells you to look at these for configuration information.

    'Course, the WPA password is auto-generated at the factory based on the wireless MAC and is trivial for an attacker to calculate, but points for effort.
     
  13. modgodtanvir

    modgodtanvir Prepare - for Mortal Bumbat!

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    Sorry. Sorry...

    I've learnt my lesson.

    In all seriousness though, if someone is allowed to enter your house legally as long as they don't break and enter, it should not be a crime to use someones WiFI, unless they needed to do some code cracking first....
     
  14. docodine

    docodine killed a guy once

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    Lincolnshire, IL? I probably know him. :O
     
  15. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    No, Lincolnshire here in the UK.
     
  16. Guest-16

    Guest-16 Guest

    If my neighbour comes into my home, puts down a plate of chocolates, then leaves with no word, no note, or not covering telling me not to touch them, then I log into my PC and it tells me "there's chocolate over there if you want to have one".

    Hell yea I'd eat it.
     
  17. chrisb2e9

    chrisb2e9 Dont do that...

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    in this day and age its so easy for anyone to set up a password. if you leave the network open, you should expect people to use it. if you dont want them to, add a password.
     
  18. andyp06

    andyp06 New Member

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    Why the hell were the Police called-in anyway? If someone gets on my WIFi, I'll change the encryption, kick them out & carry on. Job done. If they carry-on hacking, I'll carry on reconfiguring. They'll soon find something easier & more rewarding to do. In this case it seems an unencrypted system was running & the boy selected it by mistake.
     
  19. UrbanMarine

    UrbanMarine Government Prostitute

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    Here in the states there is no law for usings someone's wifi connect (GREY AREA). It only becomes an issue if you hack, alter, damage etc their system and/or equipment. So basicly if you wanted to browse the web with someone elses internet there is no violation of the law. I need to dig up an article I read a few months back about the US and the internet.

    Heres one: http://money.cnn.com/2005/08/08/technology/personaltech/internet_piracy/index.htm
     
  20. DarkLord7854

    DarkLord7854 New Member

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    All routers I've seen/used come with a setup utility that the manual says to run, which, if you complete it, asks you to set a password for your router. Most people don't bother with it and just leave their router unencrypted.

    Honestly, even if someone does something bad with your wifi.. if you left it unencrypted, then it's your own fault. It's like saying "Well, I left my front door open and someone came in to my house, that *******!"
     
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