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News Microsoft claims Windows 8 'most widely used' yet

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Gareth Halfacree, 8 Oct 2012.

  1. GoodBytes

    GoodBytes How many wifi's does it have?

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    Everyone that sees my laptop (which runs Windows 8 RTM), ask me about it, and wants to check it out. All want to upgrade after playing. So far, what I am noticing is that the majority of complainers are us, computer enthusiasts. Of course, I am not in a non-computer enthusiasts forum to really know, nor ever collected statistical data. But I haven't had 1 person that didn't ask me when it will be out, and where they can get it.

    Like the ribbon bar, new task bar in Windows 7, we freak out and call doom too easily. Plus, we get our-self influenced too much with sites that bashes a new Windows, as it attracts clicks.

    As a Windows 8 user, I have a list of complaints, short one, none of them are enough to make me not buy it, but all items in my list aren't mentioned anywhere in those bashing Windows 8 ""articles"", or only a hand full mention them.
    For example, if you have a Modern UI/Metro App that can open a file type, despite having another program, set as default, that can open it. When you'll double click on that file type, Windows will open it using the Metro App, THEN a pop-up will open on the corner of the screen saying "Another program can open this file". Which you click on it, to get a list of program installed on your computer that can open it.

    So for example, let's say you installed PhotoShop, and set in Photoshop to open jpg files. You double click on a jpg file, and the Metro/Modern UI picture viewer opens, and you have Windows popping up a box saying "Another program can open this file". You click on it, and then a list of program shows up. NOw you get to pick PhotoShop, and it sets to it for next time.

    Now you have to do this for EVERY file type, that a Metro App can open.

    Now why it's not a killer, well, once you install Windows 8 and all your programs, you just need to open Default Program panels, and click on every program and click on "Set As default". It's annoying, but you do it only once. And it only applies to apps that a Metro/Modern UI App can view, that you have installed. So if you remove that Metro App, you are good as well. And if you don't, well you only need to do it for: Web browser, Picture viewer/editor software and video/music player, pretty much.

    So its just an extra step for me. Not the end of the world. To me, Windows 8 has more benefits which compensate for this drawback.
     
  2. fdbh96

    fdbh96 New Member

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    "Quite what the company has done with that telemetry data, however, is unclear."
    Hopefully the've ignored it. The OS is just better, I use the start screen instead of a menu (the same way just hit the windows button on the keyboard) and your at a bigger and better start menu. Its actually better for me because I can get to the start screen while in game, whereas I couldn't with the start menu.
    It does seem like desktop users are annoyed purely because for the first time, they aren't the sole attention of Microsoft.
     
  3. Yslen

    Yslen Lord of the Twenty-Seventh Circle

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    Agreed, I forgot to mention that. I actually miss it when using 7 now.


    Some people seem determined to make Win 7/8 look like 95 too, reverting to the oldest looking theme available as if it looks or performs better.


    I didn't even notice this. I guess I installed software prior to trying to open anything.


    Looks that way to me too. I'd rather have an OS that is successful and widely used than restricted to one relatively small user group, though. It seems to have brought the price down, for one thing, which I guess is partly due to a larger market.
     
  4. OWNED66

    OWNED66 New Member

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    i think its a billion hours is because almost no one knew how to shut it down
    i had to google it first
    because pressing the power button sent it to sleep mode ......
    worst OS ever made for desktops
    i wish if microsoft just installed something that would give the user a choice to use the new UI or not
    why is that soo hard ? why are they forcing every one
    the good news is that i heard most companies will have win 7 options even after win8 comes out
     
  5. fdbh96

    fdbh96 New Member

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    Holding down, rather than pressing the power button usually shuts it down, and all of the options are in the charms menu (its in the intro when starting the os for the first time). They aren't forcing anyone, win 7 will be supported for a long time yet. However, soing that runs the risk of being left behind, as both microsoft and apple, and ubuntu I believe are moving to a mobile and desktop combined OS.
     
  6. GoodBytes

    GoodBytes How many wifi's does it have?

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    You can change the power button does the same way and location as in Windows 7.
    Shutting down your computer doesn't provide any benefits over sleep, assuming you won't unplug your computer, or want to change stuff inside the system. I always sleep my computer, since Vista.

    Different ways to turn off your computer:
    -> Change what the power button does
    -> Win+I > Power > Shutdown
    -> Alt+F4 on desktop
    -> Open charm bar > Settings > Power > Shutdown.

    You can't have "Choose the way Windows looks" option, else it creates fragmentation and makes documentation and helping other a serious pain.

    Microsoft always allows you to exchange your license of the latest Windows to a previous version. You can buy Windows 8, call Microsoft and request an XP license, or Windows 98 license. They'll ask you to ship your copy of Windows to them, and they'll ship you the older Windows. Nothing new here.

    Most businesses won't update to Windows 8. They follow a 6 to 10 year OS update cycle. Some companies, and even banks still runs on NT 4 or Windows 2000. This is nothing new. Microsoft obviously tries to change that. But they take this opportunity where many businesses already upgraded to Win7, to experiment and improve their product related to new telemetry data related to the new interface. A very smart move.
    Consumers are easy to adapt. Business are worst than many of us, when it comes to change.
     
  7. Icy EyeG

    Icy EyeG Controlled by Eyebrow Powers™

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  8. faugusztin

    faugusztin I *am* the guy with two left hands

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    Why ?

    1.64% of Windows computers in 2009 and 0.33% of Windows computers in 2012 can look like a huge difference in percentage, while in absolute values Windows 8 numbers can be higher than Windows 7 numbers in 2009.

    And you need to put those numbers in the context as well. When 7 came out, what we had was extremly old XP or Vista with very bad press. That means both XP and Vista crowd was trying out the new OS, and both crowds had reason to stay and use 7 - because it was that much better than XP/Vista. Now with Windows 8, people try it, and then return to their tested Windows 7 because they don't have such huge reason to upgrade.

    In short, those numbers are not comparable - it's like comparing Windows Mobile 6.1->Windows Phone 7 numbers (comparable to XP/Vista->7 switch) versus Windows Phone 7 to Windows Phone 7.5 updates (7->8).
     
  9. GoodBytes

    GoodBytes How many wifi's does it have?

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    They don't say how they collected the data. If they are looking at "popular websites", then it probably obvious that the mainstream user won't get Windows 8 Beta release. Many also tried Windows 8 under Virtual PC. Back in Windows 7, most people, even here, didn't have the computation power to run Windows 7 under Virtual PC environment smoothly, so they installed it as main OS, and started to use it. When you are in a virtual environment, you just have a quick peek, and close it, and stay with your current OS. you don't actually USE the OS. You won't even install your preferred web browser really surf the web, and why would you? Even if you have the computation power, it's still not as smooth experience as the main OS.
     
    Last edited: 8 Oct 2012
  10. Icy EyeG

    Icy EyeG Controlled by Eyebrow Powers™

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    Indeed, but IMO I think it applies to both computerworld and the Windows 8 blog.
     
  11. azrael-

    azrael- I'm special...

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    I call bull feces on that claim from MS.

    Also, I have yet to meet people (you know, IRL) who actually _like_ TUICRTATUIFKAM* on the desktop (I don't mind, and actually applaud, it on mobile touch-enabled devices). Actually, outside the few MS apologists I don't really see anyone liking TUICRTATUIFKAM* on the desktop.

    I sincerely hope that Win 8 in its current form tanks spectacularly, so MS goes back to the drawing board with regard to its UI decisions.

    *The UI commonly referred to as the UI formerly known as Metro
     
  12. SpAceman

    SpAceman New Member

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    I got my 13 year old sister to try out Windows 8 along with my girlfriend who uses computers on a regular basis but is by no means a power user. They both loved it. They liked having apps on a PC, they liked the Start Screen with everything right there and visible in front of them, they liked the idea of having the same interface across all platforms when I explained it would be the same on desktops, laptops and tablets.

    My mum even liked the look of it said that although it might seem a bit weird at first she could see herself getting used to it because it "seemed more user friendly".

    Calling it. Windows 8 is going to be popular with mainstream users. Especially those with some sort of smartphone.

    This is absolutely true.
    I work part time in IT at a medium sized company (around 50 people in the office) and we have a mixture of machines with XP and 7. We wont be getting 8 for quite a while because it is simply a pain to have multiple OS's to maintain. We cant afford an office wide upgrade so we get Win7 as we get new machines. If we started getting Win8 machines we would just be making support harder.
     
    Last edited: 8 Oct 2012
  13. GoodBytes

    GoodBytes How many wifi's does it have?

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  14. impar

    impar Well-Known Member

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    Greetings!
    Doubtful.
    And, even if true, it fails to explain the way W7 graphic line went upwards as compared to W8 steady movement upwards. W7 had an excelent reputation before its release, W8, meh!
    Funny thing is that if Microsoft allowed for UI choice, W8 would be an absolute success, even in the enterprise environment.
     
  15. GoodBytes

    GoodBytes How many wifi's does it have?

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    But it would have been a failure for Microsoft.
    Because then you won't be able to enter a new area if you will in computers, and in a business side of thing, Modern UI/Metro Apps won't kick-off as much or at all as most people would use the classic way, and that mean low to even loosing revenue for Microsoft due to the low sales (maintaining the store cost a lot of money, not to mention the amount of research and development in creating WinRT. You need billions of dollars to pay that off, and possible several millions of dollar per year to maintain the infrastructure world wide).
     
  16. impar

    impar Well-Known Member

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    Greetings!
    So, offering choice for its customers is now regarded as a failure?
    :worried:

    Whoever wanted Metro, Start Screen, Charms, Metro apps, would still be able to use them, whoever doesnt want to use them wouldnt be forced to.
    Win-Win.
     
  17. XXAOSICXX

    XXAOSICXX Member

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    I've been using Windows 8 for some time...and I like it, alot. I'll be upgrading and those I've shown it to have said the same. There's no pleasing some people, it would seem, but those who haven't actually USED it, as in, removed Windows 7 and gone in with both feet really shouldn't comment since you honestly haven't given it enough of a chance.

    Booting into Windows 8 once or twice, poking around to find a few things you don't like so that you can come online and bash it, and then going back to Windows 7 really doesn't do what is actually a superb OS justice.

    The comment about the Program Manager made me LOL IRL ;)
     
  18. faugusztin

    faugusztin I *am* the guy with two left hands

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    Read the second part of the post, that explains it why it doesn't climb up so sharply.
     
  19. impar

    impar Well-Known Member

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    Greetings!
    The second part mentions upgrading WP7 to WP7.5 as different OSes, its more like a SP.
    Do you know anyone downgrading to WP7 after trying WP7.5?
     
  20. faugusztin

    faugusztin I *am* the guy with two left hands

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    Your reading skills are really poor then.

    The second part was about :
    1) XP/Vista->7 being a big change (an usable 64-bit OS for XP users, better memory management and SSD support for both etc), and that being the reason for extremely high use of Release Candidates. Similar to Windows Mobile->Windows Phone 7 Change.
    2) 7->8 is a relatively small change compared to that, there are no big architecture changes in the underlying architecture (maybe except the new Storage Spaces), all changes are centered pretty much on UI (Metro, new Start Screen etc). Many users now have Windows 7 and don't feel the need for upgrade for those new UI features, thus adoption is much lower.

    Simply put there is no way you can compare the pre-7 market with the pre-8 market, before 7 you had only bad (Vista) and worse (XP) choice.
     

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