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Risks in building own box

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by LOI_Kratong, 24 Jun 2006.

  1. LOI_Kratong

    LOI_Kratong New Member

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    Hi, I'm looking at building my own box, I have it all planned out (thanks to the help of guys on here), but I'm a bit nervous. I'm only young (16), and can't afford for the components not to work.

    If I buy them all and follow a tutorial what are the honest chances of success?
     
  2. Pookeyhead

    Pookeyhead It's big, and it's clever.

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    Extremely good. It's not really difficult at all. Just double check all connections... make sure no wires are caught in the case etc.. make sure your fans are all connected, and the heatsinks make good contact with the CPU etc. Take your time, and if you feel you're getting out of your depth, come on here and ask, or google for an answer.... never try to just wing it... get help.

    Good luck! It's great fun!

    {edit} read up on the dangers of static charge damage to components like the CPU, memory and graphics processor. It's a real risk, so take precautions.
     
  3. LOI_Kratong

    LOI_Kratong New Member

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    OK cool thanks, I'll give it a go. Any tutorial or book you would recommend? it seems pretty hard trying to find one that is written so that someone new to building could follow it...
     
  4. oasked

    oasked Stuck in (better) mud

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    Its easy if you take your time and take the advice of fellow forum members. :)

    Go for it.
     
  5. Pie_uk

    Pie_uk British beef, in Britain

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  6. Pookeyhead

    Pookeyhead It's big, and it's clever.

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    http://www.buildeasypc.com/

    3 seconds in google game me this. Honestly, just google "How to build a computer" and you'll have what you need. Anything you're not sure of, just post a question in here (after searching to see if the question hasn't already been asked recently of course).

    You'll be surprised how easy it is. If you do have any problems, I doubt it will be at the build stage, it will be at the setup stage, and installing windows stage. Again... just ask for advice.
     
  7. Ab$olut

    Ab$olut New Member

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    If you are worried about things breaking then wear an anti-static band or just rub your hands on a radiator a few times should discharge any static.Double check things aswell if something don't work it might not of been you and might of been doa(dead on arrival) so just rma it. ;)
     
  8. Ramble

    Ramble Ginger Nut

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    I'm 16 and it's easy as piss to build a computer.

    Honestly, the hardest bit is sharp stuff like the edge of PCBs, you've gotta mind them.

    Oh, and broken stuff is quite annoying.

    EDIT: My advice is also go with quality stuff, it'll cost you a lot more, and it's hard to earn a ton of money, but going with cheap stuff is a recipe for disaster.
     
  9. Guest-16

    Guest-16 Guest

    Most people here were building theirs at 16 or less, and back then the parts werent colour coded like today.

    It's an expensive hobby, but worth it once you get into it. Even if you start with slow parts and work upwards.
     
  10. Veles

    Veles DUR HUR

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    http://sysbuild.corsairmemory.com/report.aspx?id=2&sid=1 is a really useful tutorial

    I wanted to do mine when I was about 14 but never managed to raise the cash to get one untill now (18 when I made mine).

    It can be very easy, mine was an absolute breeze (apart from the windows activation cos my OEM disk was really old so had to do phone activation :( )

    So long as you know the parts work together it should be fine, I was a little worried about screwing up the application of thermal paste on my CPU but it's dead easy.

    As pookey said, static charge can really screw up you build, you can either touch the metal part of a radiator every now and again or to make sure, wear and anti-static wrist strap. Also, keep cats and other fluffy static bombs of doom away.

    Good luck, and if you run into any problems just ask us in the tech support forum and I'm sure someone whill know what to do.
     
  11. specofdust

    specofdust Banned

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    It's just mechano only a fair bit easier to stick together because the pieces dont get lost or eaten by 3 year olds.

    Assuming you don't screw around it's fairly rare for anything to go seriously wrong.

    Just don't expect it to boot first time, I've built maybe 4 or 5 systems in my life, and they never boot first time. I've always had to tinker, or play some with the BIOS, or switch the power on at the wall.

    You'll forget to do a tonne of stuff, but you'll get it in the end, and it's the very best way to learn :D

    If you get stuck there's here for help, and good luck :)
     
  12. Dinh

    Dinh New Member

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    Don't forget theres a slight chance of a DOA product. Just take your time and double check connections!
     
  13. LOI_Kratong

    LOI_Kratong New Member

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    Awesome, thanks guys, I have the POWER! Well, the confidence at least, I'll oder the parts and get cracking...
     
  14. Its_Me

    Its_Me New Member

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    Well i was 15 when i first built my own computer. It is pretty straight foward just make sure all your parts match (for example a socket 939 processor with a socket 939 motherboard and so on) and also make sure u have stuff like your cpu fan plugged in before you first start up your pc and wear a anti static wrist wrap or something to get rid of static. Other than that building a pc is easy.
     
  15. Supershanks

    Supershanks New Member

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    80% of the work is in choosing the components & researching the build. Select the components u can afford then find a forum that supports your motherboard there are plenty around. Spend some time lurking b4 u ordere your parts & check that your components are going to be ok, you might like to post a thread speciffying components & asking for opinions.

    Look for building guides specific to your chosen configuration, these will give u help on topics likely to be important to your parts. you'll genrally find them on the specific sites abit, dfi msi & asus all have their own forums.

    luck :D
     
  16. specofdust

    specofdust Banned

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    Tbh, aside from the DFIstreet forums none of those manufacturer forums are going to be anywhere near as good as bit-tech. DFUstreet has a lot of very specific knowledge mostly for overclockers. If you wanna build a machine, there's more then enough expertise on this board.
     
  17. Supershanks

    Supershanks New Member

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    Don't dispute the expertise of this forum, just saying if i buy a ford i tend to go to aford garage, a vauxhall a gm garage. all the manufacturers forums have a raft of detail, about the quircks of their mobos. Be it the extra power connectors present on some boards or usb header incompatability between mobo & certain cases.
     
  18. HapeMask

    HapeMask New Member

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    I can't agree more, I've never had a box boot on the first try after a build either, and its always something simple, like a loose connection or an unplugged molex connection, but you learn something new each time. (For instance I learned last weekend when building a computer for a friend, that if the motherboard ships with the SPDIF connector bent at a 45deg. angle from the normal, it's probably not the only problem you'll find :)) Another little tip is to never force anything. With the single exception of the cpu heatsink, nothing in your build should take any serious amount of force to install, and if you feel like you're pushing too hard then you probably are. Even with the cpu heatsink, I've snapped the little metal pin that holds the screwdriver in place off of a stock hsf before, that was interesting...
     
  19. Cheap Mod Wannabe

    Cheap Mod Wannabe New Member

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    Hey don't worry I was 15 when I built my first box, and hardware is your least worries, just don't touch the circuits and ground yourself. Installing windows when I was a noob was a real challenge (installing properly).

    Here's a video I made of one PC I built. I was 17 when the video was taken. Google Video Link

    (BTW yes I know those are trademarks at the beginning, I was stupid to put them there)
     
  20. Veles

    Veles DUR HUR

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    Mine did :p First try bulding a rig, booted first time in perfect working order :rock: [/gloat]

    Anyway :p, some tweezers can come in handy sometimes, like some long bent nose ones or some longish needle nose pliers. I say this incase you drop something or you don't want to tear all your hair out trying to plug a fan into a really awkwardly placed connector :wallbash:

    As Cheap Mod Wannabe said, try not to touch any of the circuitry on the on PCBs (the big boards with all the stuff attached if you don't know what a PCB is), hold the PCB by it's edges (like when you don't want to get grubby hand prints on a photograph). Oh yeah, avoid touching the top of the chip or the bottom of your heatsink, skin oild arn't great conductors of heat so it will impair the cooling of your CPU slightly (shouldn't make a huge difference though).
     

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