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Windows Shutdown is preventing windows from shutting down or restarting?!

Discussion in 'Tech Support' started by dave_salmon, 6 Sep 2011.

  1. dave_salmon

    dave_salmon New Member

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    I just tried to shut my PC down, only to be told that "Windows can't shutdown because one or more services are still in use".

    When I check exactly what is preventing windows from shutting down, it simply says "Shutdown is preventing windows from shutting down or restarting".

    I had to "Force shutdown" which worked.

    I've restarted twice since the forced shutdown and not had a repeat of the issue.

    I did notice that the windows update icon was showing 5 times in the task tray just before I shutdown, could this be a bug/glitch?


    I'm on Windows 7 home premium x64, all up to date. The last progs I installed were Winrar and VLC yesterday. Nothing else since.

    I've googled and can't find much that matches my experience, some similar stuff but different behaviours.


    Any one any ideas?
     
    Last edited: 6 Sep 2011
  2. GoodBytes

    GoodBytes How many wifi's does it have?

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    Don't get angry or pissing on the following question: Is your Windows legit? (of course you will say yes, on a public forum). But my point is that non-legit Windows can (and does for most and probably all of them), carry a broken code as the removal of the activation code on many system files, isn't just deleting some dll files. It's embed alright. So hackers basically open up every file using an Hex decoder, or tried to work with decompiled source code (which isn't the way it was originally programmed, not even remotely close), and decide to go "Oh that looks like some activation system code... delete!, Next file", and obviously they don't test anything.

    Now if it is a legit Windows, check if you have any errors in the Event log.
    Uusally when you get this problem, is background process that doesn't want to get or takes time to close. But as your Windows is a clean install, and to my knowledge they are no startup Winrar, VLC (but they are for Adobe plug-ins and other stuff from them, and drivers.. so remove these startup), I can only guess that Windows Update service kicks-in, and as being killed, it restart itself.

    Open services panel.
    Open up Windows Update service properties.
    From there, go under the Recover tab, then set First failure to Take No action.

    This should help.
    But personally I would just do a clean install again. If something is broken now, at this point, maybe something else. is as well.

    What I suggest to do (and to also make Windows update process go faster)
    -> Install Win7 via a fast USB2.0 key (25-30MB/s read preferably) to install it quick in about 7min.
    -> Activate Windows, Windows update ONLY to get your drivers (don't put the ones from Windows in it), and install your drivers. Restart your computer when asked. Take your time, do things slowly
    -> Download and install Windows 7 SP1 directly. This will install A HUGE amount of updates at the same time, saving you a lot of time. http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?id=5842 (you want the 903.0MB one, called windows6.1-KB976932-X64.exe). Feel free to download it on a different system while your are install Win7 on this computer. OR before you format and re-install Win7 again. You can put it on the same USB key with Windows 7 setup, if you go that root. It won't install it at setup, of course, but it's conveniently placed there, if you have the room in your key.
    -> Now once all done, all restarted, you can finish the remainder of the updates.

    Installing SP1 as a first Windows update, should shave off 30min to even 1 hour based on your connection and computer speed.
     
    Last edited: 7 Sep 2011
    dave_salmon likes this.
  3. dave_salmon

    dave_salmon New Member

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    Yeah I can understand why you ask if it's a legal copy, I stumbled across a few answers to similar problems to mine that pointed to the use of an illegal copy.

    It's actually a brand spanking new copy of Win7 I bought with my new system.

    My only issue with the course of action you have suggested is, the copy I have is an OEM copy that I got to shave a few pennies off my build cost and I'm not familiar with how the re-install process works differently with an OEM copy if it's even different at all?

    It's also got 'SP1' plastered on the case, so the seperate install of the service pack isn't an option I don't think...

    I did also remember that I'd just installed a brand new copy of CS5 suite that work have given me so I can work from home, so I'll check for adobe processes in the startup list as well.


    Thanks for the very detailed reply Goodbytes, very much appreciated +Rep
     
  4. GoodBytes

    GoodBytes How many wifi's does it have?

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    Windows 7 OEM install/re-install process is identical to the retail version.
    The only difference is that the product key is locked down to your motherboard at the first activation. So, you can change your motherboard with the same one, just fine, even possibly a different model but on the same chipset (guessing here). But you can't change the motherboard entirely to something different, as it assume that it's a different computer, and you can't transfer your license. Only if the current motherboard isn't produced anymore, and you are stuck getting something different, that you override the activation via phone activation.
     

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