Hardware iSCSI Storage: What is it, and why you should be using it

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Sifter3000, 25 May 2010.

  1. Sifter3000

    Sifter3000 I used to be somebody

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  2. Phalanx

    Phalanx Needs more dragons and stuff.

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    Interesting idea. I run a server at the moment for keeping files stored, but I'm considering something different to allow me to use the server as a folding rig.

    How much would a setup like this cost for an average one?
     
  3. phuzz

    phuzz This is a title

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    FreeNAS has iSCSI built in, and the new version (OpenMediaVault) will have it as well. So to answer your question Ph4lanx, free, that's how much :)
     
  4. mi1ez

    mi1ez Active Member

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    That first picture on page one would have me worried about my NAS!
     
  5. wuyanxu

    wuyanxu still wants Homeworld 3

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    very nice tutorial.

    what about other OS? if they don't have iSCSI, would it be possible to do the mapped network drive as usual?
     
  6. Xir

    Xir Well-Known Member

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    ...isn't that about the same as what NDAS does?
    (only without extra drivers)
     
  7. phuzz

    phuzz This is a title

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    OSX has had it since 10.4, M$ since win2000 and linux since 2005.
    Basically if your OS doesn't support iSCSI then you're still using an Amiga.
     
  8. capnPedro

    capnPedro Hacker. Maker. Engineer.

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    I'm still not seeing the benefit over regular network drives... and look, I can actually get the amount of free space reported correctly!

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Da_Rude_Baboon

    Da_Rude_Baboon What the?

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    Have you seen the price of that Qnap though? £450!
     
  10. Bindibadgi

    Bindibadgi Daddy or chips?

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    That's just Windows Home Server being awesome.

    Yayyyy.

    Microsoft in "We can't make two Windows products talk to each other properly" shocker. It's reading the first drive in a 5-disk box that's 500GB in size.

    I know! It's a business box but the software is really very very nice. Still, I was just using it as an example for the guide :) I'll do an iSCSI one maybe for FreeNAS when I do our "build our own NAS" article, but I still need to blag some hard drives for a month to actually do it.

    Actually you had to download a PowerPack for XP to have iSCSI :duh:
     
  11. Guinevere

    Guinevere Mega Mom

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    +1 for Freenas, has pretty much any network service you want. Including iSCSI
     
  12. Hugo

    Hugo Ex-TrustedReviews Staff

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    CAT5eeeeeeee cable, you say?
     
  13. GW42

    GW42 New Member

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    Looking forward to that. Off the shelf NAS boxes always seem hideously overpriced to me.

    There are lots of options out there for homebuilds - freenas, UnRaid (heard about but not looked into closely), full blown linux server, even just setting up shared&mapped drives on a windows box. Would be good to see a detailed pros and cons list of the various OS options, and how they stack up against the software from the likes of Drobo, Thecus, Qnap etc...

    Hardware has always seemed the easy bit by comparison. I guess the only concern I have is the presumably lower power benefits of a purpose built box, but having seen power figures for a few purpose built NAS's, I'm not convinced that they're all that much better than a system built with an eye on power. Obviously a NAS is likely to be on 24/7, so things like do the disks spin down properly etc... becomes a bigger issue. I'm always surprised how few NAS reviews look at those sorts of things, though I appreciate the cost of the NAS box itself (especially an off the shelf one!) is likely to be by far the bigger cost for many years.
     
  14. moullas

    moullas New Member

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    iSCSI <> NAS

    Nas is getting a lot of pc's on a networked storage, iSCSI for attaching one pc to it (or more if having multiple LUN's), but without sharing the same volume. Unless clustering.
     
  15. ch424

    ch424 Design Warrior

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    Surely you'd have to test it with two computers simultaneously?
     
  16. C0R4X

    C0R4X New Member

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    Biggest Problem of NAS systems are their price and their horrible bad performance when transfering files to the NAS. I bought a NAS some month ago. It was a very cheap one (etrayz). Yes, you can put 3 TB into a NAS, and yes, you can stuff 8 TB into a NAS, but how long will it take to get transfered to your NAS? I think buying a cheap AMD system, which needs less then 50 Watts is the better solution. You get more for your money!
    I mean, where is the advantage when you have a Gbit network but the NAS is only able to give you a transferspeed of 20 MB / sec? Try to transfer 1.5 TB to such a NAS, it will take you days!
     
  17. Hamish

    Hamish New Member

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    i played around with iSCSI when i built my current fileserver a year or so ago
    when i reinstalled the OS on my desktop i cba reconfiguring iSCSI and just dumped the data into an SMB share
    not worth it for home users imo, theres almost no advantage
     
  18. Blackie Chan

    Blackie Chan New Member

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    I have iSCSI software on my server that shares my dvd ROM since i only have one of them. I can login into my dvd player from anywhere with the internet. The low bandwidth basically means that all I can do is jog the cd tray in and out. As far as internet file sharing I use something called HFS which generates a website based on the HDD structure. I can share pictures and music anywhere with this though my original idea was to use it to stream movies to mobile devices connected locally over VLC4iPhone. Works great, everyone should have a file server!
     
  19. Pookeyhead

    Pookeyhead It's big, and it's clever.

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    "We briefly tested the teaming feature with a motherboard we had in the lab, but found it didn't improve our performance - we suspect our mobo's Gigabit controller just isn't good enough."


    Probably because the NAS isn't capable of fully saturating a single Gigabit connection, let alone 2.
     
  20. fragg3r

    fragg3r New Member

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    I was wondering, can you share those block level targets via SMB/AFP at the same time? So far I only tried creating targets on an existing volume and it doesn't work for those.
     
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