1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

News Microsoft acquires Nokia's mobile arm

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Gareth Halfacree, 3 Sep 2013.

  1. impar

    impar Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    24 Nov 2006
    Posts:
    3,101
    Likes Received:
    41
  2. Nexxo

    Nexxo Queue Jumper

    Joined:
    23 Oct 2001
    Posts:
    33,662
    Likes Received:
    1,284
    Sorry, but that table means nothing at all. In 2007 Microsoft owned 42% of the Smartphone market. BlackBerry reached its peak of 22% market share in 2009. Both were 'gorillas' in the smartphone market. Where are they now?

    Meanwhile Apple had 0% market share before 2007, and no experience or track record in smartphones whatsoever; definitely a non-player, a weed, a tiny speck on the radar. And where is it now?
     
    Last edited: 1 Oct 2013
  3. impar

    impar Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    24 Nov 2006
    Posts:
    3,101
    Likes Received:
    41
    Greetings!
    They were crushed by iOS and Android.
    Apple now commands approximately 1/6 of the smartphone market, and shrinking to Android pressure:
    [​IMG]
    http://www.slate.com/blogs/future_t...ales_rise_to_double_apple_s_market_share.html
     
    Last edited: 1 Oct 2013
  4. Nexxo

    Nexxo Queue Jumper

    Joined:
    23 Oct 2001
    Posts:
    33,662
    Likes Received:
    1,284
    So what does that tell you about predicting future success in the smartphone market by current market share?
     
  5. impar

    impar Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    24 Nov 2006
    Posts:
    3,101
    Likes Received:
    41
    Greetings!
    So far that Android is still gaining marketshare and Nokia made the mistake of not adopting Android.
     
  6. Krazeh

    Krazeh Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    12 Aug 2003
    Posts:
    2,112
    Likes Received:
    56
    Android having the majority share of the market doesn't mean that Nokia would have ended up with a sizeable share. Nothing you've presented demonstrates that Nokia would not have simply ended up as a minor player while Samsung continued their dominance.
     
  7. Nexxo

    Nexxo Queue Jumper

    Joined:
    23 Oct 2001
    Posts:
    33,662
    Likes Received:
    1,284
    Exactly. Samsung is gaining the Android market share. There is no reason to assume Nokia would have done so instead, when six other very capable players couldn't.
     
  8. freshsandwiches

    freshsandwiches Can I do science to it?

    Joined:
    9 Aug 2009
    Posts:
    552
    Likes Received:
    15
    Took delivery of it today. I have to say I'm impressed so far. All my accounts have integrated themselves nicely and the device works well.

    It will do what I need it to do and I'm pleased I have something a little different to the crowd.

    My brief play around with the Nokia music app was fun. It seemed to work really well.
     
  9. Nexxo

    Nexxo Queue Jumper

    Joined:
    23 Oct 2001
    Posts:
    33,662
    Likes Received:
    1,284
    Some cool tricks:
    - OneNote allows you to pin a "new note" tile to the home screen. Tap it and it automatically opens into a new note for you. Tapping on the regular OneNote tile then takes you to the previously opened note.
    - Try the My Commute tile with Nokia Here Drive. At the appropriate time it flashes up estimated travel time of your commute, if it senses you are at the relevant commute location. It dynamically adapts to traffic conditions.
    - You can pin anyone to the home screen in their own tile. Their latest communication to you (or on social networks) flashes up there. Tapping the tile shows the entire history of communications between you and them, all their contact details, shared photos etc.
    - Download Phone search for a universal phone search.
    - Download Arthur Semenov's Battery Meter. Besides battery info, you can pin Bluetooth, WiFi, GPS and Airplane mode right on the home screen.
     
  10. impar

    impar Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    24 Nov 2006
    Posts:
    3,101
    Likes Received:
    41
    Greetings!
    They competed before Android, Nokia took the lead. They also competed on the minor market of WP, Nokia took the lead.
    Had Nokia took the Android road, Android market would be different than it is now.
     
  11. Krazeh

    Krazeh Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    12 Aug 2003
    Posts:
    2,112
    Likes Received:
    56
    You're still not providing any basis for this claim. The fact that Nokia may have had a majority share of the mobile phone market in the past or has managed to obtain a majority share of the WP market doesn't demonstrate they would have been able to outsell Samsung, or even come close to matching them, if they had gone with Android. What makes you think people would have bought a Nokia handset instead of a Samsung if they were given the choice?
     
  12. impar

    impar Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    24 Nov 2006
    Posts:
    3,101
    Likes Received:
    41
    Greetings!
    The brand itself, Nokia.
    It had a great reputation and a chain of stores. No other manufacturer has its retail\tech support presence. People liked that.
    I have no doubt if Nokia had chosen to go Android, Nokia would be at a much better place than it is now.
    The push to WP was to differentiate Nokia from Android and iOS, to create a third force. It has created that third force, but its just too small to battle the other two OSes (RIM\Blackberry is dead, they would probably have benefitted to go Android too).
     
  13. Nexxo

    Nexxo Queue Jumper

    Joined:
    23 Oct 2001
    Posts:
    33,662
    Likes Received:
    1,284
    Different markets, remember?

    Blackberry took the lead in Enterprise mobile communcations. Windows Mobile 6 took 42% of the mobile market. Motorola did well. Nokia took the lead--

    --along came iPhone. Total n00b in the mobile phone industry, totally new platform. Wipes out the competition, including BlackBerry, including Windows Mobile, including Motorola and Nokia.

    Along comes Android. Everybody can use it; it's free (sort of)! Along comes Samsung. Again, new in the mobile market, barely a reputation compared to, say, Sony and Motorola who were there right from the 90's onward, making solid mobiles. Samsung wipes out the competition.

    You just cannot go on past reputation in a rapidly evolving market. it means nothing.
     
  14. impar

    impar Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    24 Nov 2006
    Posts:
    3,101
    Likes Received:
    41
    Greetings!
    I didnt noticed any failure at Nokias development, release and support of WP devices. They still have the know how. They just bet on a bad horse.
     
  15. Nexxo

    Nexxo Queue Jumper

    Joined:
    23 Oct 2001
    Posts:
    33,662
    Likes Received:
    1,284
    You keep repeating yourself, yet you keep failing to bring proof or logic to underpin your view. So let's move on, shall we?
     
  16. impar

    impar Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    24 Nov 2006
    Posts:
    3,101
    Likes Received:
    41
    Greetings!
    Or someone keeps failing to understand...
     
  17. Krazeh

    Krazeh Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    12 Aug 2003
    Posts:
    2,112
    Likes Received:
    56
    I think that may be you to be honest...
     
  18. impar

    impar Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    24 Nov 2006
    Posts:
    3,101
    Likes Received:
    41
    Greetings!

    Ok, so Nokia behaved extremely well before smartphones came, continued behaving well with primitive smartphones, loses lots of ground to iOS and Android devices, competes and excels in the minor smartphone market of WP, but somehow, had Nokia gone the Android route, it would behave extremely bad?
    To believe that is of a level of intellectual dishonesty I didnt expected here.
     
  19. Nexxo

    Nexxo Queue Jumper

    Joined:
    23 Oct 2001
    Posts:
    33,662
    Likes Received:
    1,284
    I think that you are projecting.

    You keep looking at this as Nokia in isolation, not Nokia in the context of competitors in particular markets, at a particular time.

    We have already demonstrated that past performance is not a predictor of future performance for both manufacturers and operating systems. Motorola, BlackBerry and Windows Mobile all did pretty well before the iPhone came along --made by Apple which had zero market share and track record in the mobile phone market, running an operating system that had also had zero market share or track record.

    We have also demonstrated that not all markets are equal. There are a number of really good competitors in the Android market, while there are only three in the Windows Phone market. Moreover, the contributions by Samsung and HTC to the Windows Phone market are very modest in comparison to the range and quality of models that they produce for the Android market. Nokia simply has less compelling competition in the Windows Phone market --it has no Samsung Galaxy 3/4 to go up against, no HTC One, no Huwaei Ascend 6 for instance.

    Meanwhile, really good mobiles like the HTC One and Huwaei Ascend 6 are struggling to gain market share against Samsung's Galaxy range.

    Conclusion:
    - Previous track record and market share means nothing in a rapidly evolving market.
    - Competition in the Android market is fierce, with many good competitors releasing a wide range of products, and all struggling against Samsung.
    - Competition in the Windows Phone market is mild, with two competitors releasing only three medium-spec models in total (Samsung Ativ S; HTC 8S, HTC 8X now superceded by HTC 8XT, while Nokia is releasing a whole range from basic to high spec.

    Your whole argument hinges on the idea that Nokia could gain market share where HTC, Huwaei, Motorola, Sony and LG could not because in the past it made pretty decent mobiles. Well, so did Motorola, Sony and BlackBerry. The past is another country, kiddo.
     
  20. impar

    impar Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    24 Nov 2006
    Posts:
    3,101
    Likes Received:
    41
    Greetings!

    Related:
     

Share This Page